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Photo of Lauren Aleksunes Pharm.D., Ph.D., D.A.B.T.
Lauren Aleksunes, Pharm.D., Ph.D., D.A.B.T.
Professor – Pharmacology and Toxicology Ernest Mario School of PharmacyEOHSI – Toxicology Division

Lauren Aleksunes’Lab 

Recent Publications

  1. Kinkade, CW, Aleksunes, LM, Brinker, A, Buckley, B, Brunner, J, Wang, C, Miller, RK, O'Connor, TG, Rivera-Núñez, Z, Barrett, ES et al.. Associations between mycoestrogen exposure and sex steroid hormone concentrations in maternal serum and cord blood in the UPSIDE pregnancy cohort. Int J Hyg Environ Health. 2024;260 :114405. doi: 10.1016/j.ijheh.2024.114405. PubMed PMID:38878407
  2. Gutgarts, V, Gerardine, S, Shingarev, RA, Knezevic, A, Zabor, EC, Latcha, S, Joy, MS, Aleksunes, LM, Jaimes, EA. Evaluation of Cisplatin-Induced Acute Kidney Injury in Patients Co-Prescribed Serotonin Receptor Antagonists: A Retrospective Analysis. Kidney360. 2024; :. doi: 10.34067/KID.0000000000000464. PubMed PMID:38814726
  3. Chung, E, Wen, X, Jia, X, Ciallella, HL, Aleksunes, LM, Zhu, H. Hybrid non-animal modeling: A mechanistic approach to predict chemical hepatotoxicity. J Hazard Mater. 2024;471 :134297. doi: 10.1016/j.jhazmat.2024.134297. PubMed PMID:38677119
  4. Galetin, A, Brouwer, KLR, Tweedie, D, Yoshida, K, Sjöstedt, N, Aleksunes, L, Chu, X, Evers, R, Hafey, MJ, Lai, Y et al.. Membrane transporters in drug development and as determinants of precision medicine. Nat Rev Drug Discov. 2024;23 (4):255-280. doi: 10.1038/s41573-023-00877-1. PubMed PMID:38267543
  5. Kozlosky, D, Doherty, C, Buckley, B, Goedken, MJ, Miller, RK, Huh, DD, Barrett, ES, Aleksunes, LM. Fetoplacental Disposition and Toxicity of Cadmium in Mice Lacking the Bcrp Transporter. Toxicol Sci. 2023;197 (2):132-46. doi: 10.1093/toxsci/kfad115. PubMed PMID:37941438 PubMed Central PMC10823776
  6. Zhang, R, Walker, L, Wen, X, Doherty, C, Gorczyca, L, Buckley, B, Barrett, ES, Aleksunes, LM. Placental BCRP transporter reduces cadmium accumulation and toxicity in immortalized human trophoblasts. Reprod Toxicol. 2023;121 :108466. doi: 10.1016/j.reprotox.2023.108466. PubMed PMID:37660740 PubMed Central PMC10591833
  7. Russo, DP, Aleksunes, LM, Goyak, K, Qian, H, Zhu, H. Integrating Concentration-Dependent Toxicity Data and Toxicokinetics To Inform Hepatotoxicity Response Pathways. Environ Sci Technol. 2023;57 (33):12291-12301. doi: 10.1021/acs.est.3c02792. PubMed PMID:37566783 PubMed Central PMC10448720
  8. Rivera-Núñez, Z, Hansel, M, Capurro, C, Kozlosky, D, Wang, C, Doherty, CL, Buckley, B, Ohman-Strickland, P, Miller, RK, O'Connor, TG et al.. Prenatal Cadmium Exposure and Maternal Sex Steroid Hormone Concentrations across Pregnancy. Toxics. 2023;11 (7):. doi: 10.3390/toxics11070589. PubMed PMID:37505555 PubMed Central PMC10384739
  9. Kozlosky, D, Lu, A, Doherty, C, Buckley, B, Goedken, MJ, Miller, RK, Barrett, ES, Aleksunes, LM. Cadmium reduces growth of male fetuses by impairing development of the placental vasculature and reducing expression of nutrient transporters. Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 2023;475 :116636. doi: 10.1016/j.taap.2023.116636. PubMed PMID:37487938 PubMed Central PMC10528997
  10. Lazofsky, A, Brinker, A, Gupta, R, Barrett, E, Aleksunes, LM, Rivera-Núñez, Z, Buckley, B. Optimized extraction and analysis methods using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for zearalenone and metabolites in human placental tissue. Heliyon. 2023;9 (6):e16940. doi: 10.1016/j.heliyon.2023.e16940. PubMed PMID:37484340 PubMed Central PMC10361036
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Photo of Tracy Anthony Ph.D.
Tracy Anthony, Ph.D.
Professor EOHSI Division of ToxicologySchool of Environmental and Biological Sciences

Research Interests

The Anthony Lab studies homeostatic responses to changes in nutrient supply and environmental stress. Our experiments aim to identify dietary components and cellular processes that prevent and treat serious diseases and promote healthspan. Over the years my group has published numerous high impact publications which delineate mechanisms of metabolic and proteostasis control by diet, drugs, genetics and environmental stressors. These works have spanned many organ systems including endocrine, gastrointestinal, hepatobiliary, immune, lymphatic, muscular and the central nervous system. With respect to diet and nutrient supply, we study how amino acid insufficiency or imbalance alters tissue proteostasis in the whole animal. We use experimental models that alter amino acid availability and work to understand how altering the supply of amino acids, in total or individually, is sensed and communicated under different metabolic states. We also are interested in metabolic and molecular responses to exercise and the crosstalk between diet and physical activity. Current projects in the laboratory may be grouped into the following areas:

Homeostatic responses to amino acid insufficiency

Alterations in amino acid availability and balance are sensed by overlapping signal transduction cascades. Two major signaling nodes responsive to amino acid supply in mammals are the: 1) Integrated Stress Response (ISR), also called the Amino Acid Response (AAR) and 2) mechanistic Target Of Rapamycin Complex 1 (mTORC1) pathway. While the mTORC1 pathway functions as a sensor of amino acid abundance to stimulate growth, the ISR/AAR is activated by amino acid deprivation to slow growth and instead favor cytoprotective and adaptive processes. How these signaling pathways work together to regulate gene-specific translation and promote cellular resilience is a major research focus of the lab. This project uses genetic strains of mice with targeted deficiencies in the ISR/AAR in combination of sophisticated molecular biology and stable isotope techniques to assess control of proteostasis and metabolism in tissues of mice.

Mechanisms of toxicity by asparaginase

Asparaginase is an important part of the remission induction regimen for treating acute lymphoblastic leukemia, the most common childhood cancer. The enzyme breaks down circulating asparagine and glutamine, creating a physiologically relevant model of amino acid deficiency. In leukemic cells which express very little asparagine synthetase (the enzyme that makes asparagine), asparaginase inflicts a lethal amino acid starvation. Yet for reasons not completely understood, cancer patients may unpredictably suffer severe complications, such as thromboembolism, liver failure and pancreatitis. Our lab was the first to report that phosphorylation of the translation factor, eIF2, by the amino acid sensor, GCN2, is activated by asparaginase. We were also the first to describe the ISR as the body’s first responder to asparaginase exposure. Since then we have gone on to show the impact of obesity and age on liver responses to asparaginase and we continue to use this agent as a research tool and study it to improve its efficacy to treat cancer and other diseases. This project utilizes a combination of biochemical, dietary, metabolic and molecular approaches in mice to identify mechanisms by which asparaginase causes metabolic complications and cell death. These results will be used to increase the safety and efficacy of asparaginase and to develop improved personalized approaches to the treatment of serious diseases.

ER stress and the Unfolded Protein Response

Chemical, environmental or nutritional perturbations that disrupt homeostasis within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) activate a mechanism called the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR, also called the ER Stress Response). Phosphorylation of the translation factor eIF2 by PERK constitutes one arm of the UPR which serves to alleviate cell stress and re-establish homeostasis through a reprogramming of gene expression driven by the transcription factor ATF4. My laboratory is interested in exploring how the PERK-eIF2-ATF4 arm of the UPR contributes to the overall cellular effort to promote cellular adaptation and survival in response to a wide variety of environmental insults and proteotoxic stress agents.

Dietary protein, exercise, muscle growth and metabolic homeostasis

The interface of dietary protein and exercise as it relates to optimization of lean body mass is a longstanding area of interest and study. Previous projects in the lab include identifying metabolic and transcriptional signatures in the muscle of exercised horses, and varying the composition, distribution, source and/or timing of dietary protein on mTORC1 signaling and protein synthesis in mice. Information gained in this area will be targeted to relevant populations to improve performance and promote recovery and resilience.

 

Photo of Elisa Bandera M.D., Ph.D.
Elisa Bandera, M.D., Ph.D.
Rutgers University- School of Public HealthRutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey

 

Dr. Bandera earned an MD degree from the University of Málaga, Spain and a PhD in Epidemiology and Community Health from the State University of New York at Buffalo, where she also completed post-doctoral training in nutritional epidemiology of cancer.  She is currently Professor and Chief, Cancer Epidemiology and Health Outcomes and Co-Leader, Cancer Prevention and Control Program, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey; Professor of Medicine and Epidemiology, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School and Rutgers School of Public Health.

Major research interests include the impact of obesity and body composition and related comorbidities on breast and ovarian cancer risk, treatment and survival outcomes and survivorship, with a focus on cancer health disparities.  She has served as Principal Investigator in several epidemiologic studies, including the New Jersey Ovarian Cancer Study, which is a member of the Ovarian Cancer Association International Consortium, the Jersey Girl Study (a study evaluating factors affecting puberty in girls), the Women’s Circle of Health Study (a study of breast cancer in African American women, which is a member of the AMBER Consortium), the Women’s Circle of Health Follow-up Study (a cohort study of African American breast cancer survivors) and KP-ROCS (a cohort study evaluating the impact of obesity on ovarian cancer treatment and survival in which racial/ethnic disparities in treatment outcomes and survival were also evaluated).  Her research has been funded by several grants from the National Cancer Institute.

Dr. Bandera has served in numerous advisory boards and expert panels for several organizations, including the American Cancer Society, the National Cancer Institute, the International Agency for Research on Cancer, the American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR) and the World Cancer Research Fund International (WCRF).  She is very involved in translating epidemiologic findings to public health action at the national and international levels. She was a member of the American Cancer Society’s 2006 Committee on Nutrition and Physical Activity Guidelines for Cancer Prevention.  She also served as a member of the American Cancer Society’s 2012 and 2018 Guidelines on Nutrition and Physical Activity for Cancer Prevention and Survival Committee.  Dr. Bandera led the Systematic Literature Review and meta-analysis on endometrial cancer in support of the 2007 WCRF/AICR Second Expert Report on Food, Nutrition, Physical Activity and the Prevention of Cancer.  For more than 10 years she served as a member of the WCRF/AICR International Expert Panel for the Continuous Update Project and the WCRF/AICR Third Expert Report on Diet, Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Cancer: A Global Perspective, released in May 2018.  She also served as Chair of the Lifestyle Behaviors, Energy Balance and Chemoprevention Special Interest Group of the American Society of Preventive Oncology (ASPO) and as a member of the ASPO Executive Committee (2016-2019). At the state level, Dr. Bandera led the Nutrition and Physical Activity Workgroup of the New Jersey Task Force on Cancer Prevention, Early Detection, and Treatment for more than ten years and served as Vice Chair of the Advisory Group for Cancer Prevention and Control of the New Jersey Commission on Cancer Research.

Grant Review Panels (selected)

  • NIH Cancer, Heart and Sleep Epidemiology Study Section Panel B, CHSB
  • National Cancer Institute Initial Review Group Subcommittee J for Population and Patient-Oriented Training
  • National Cancer Institute Review Group Subcommittee G for Education
  • National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel Loan Repayment Program for Clinical Research
  • Ovarian Cancer Research Program of the Department of Defense’s Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs
  • American Institute for Cancer Research Grant Review Panel I
  • World Cancer Research Fund International RFA on Biomarkers Research Panel.

 

Photo of Emily S Barrett Ph.D.
Emily S Barrett, Ph.D.
George G. Rhoads Endowed Legacy Professor Vice Chair, Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology – Epidemiology Concentration Director – Rutgers School of Public HealthEOHSI – Environmental and Population Health Biosciences Division

Dr. Barrett is an Associate Professor in the Rutgers University School of Public Health, Department of Epidemiology. She received an A.B. in Biology and English from Amherst College and a Ph.D. in Biological Anthropology from Harvard University. She completed a post-doctoral fellowship at the University of California-Los Angeles. Before coming to Rutgers, she was on the faculty at the University of Rochester, where she remains an Adjunct Associate Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Public Health Sciences.

Research Areas

Dr. Barrett’s primary research focus is on the early origins of health and disease and how exposures early in life shape our subsequent health and developmental trajectories. Because gestation is a particularly sensitive period when body systems are first forming, exposures during this period may have profound downstream effects. Dr. Barrett is particularly interested in how prenatal exposures to environmental chemicals and psychosocial stressors impact pregnancy and children’s development. She leads several ongoing NIH-funded pregnancy cohort studies and is actively involved in the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) Environmental Influences on Child Health Outcomes (ECHO) program, the largest study of the health and well-being of United States children. Through these studies, Dr. Barrett and colleagues are currently investigating the placental, hormonal, immune, epigenetic, and microbial mechanisms by which early life exposures impact downstream health.

Dr. Barrett studies the early origins of health and disease, or how exposures early in life shape our subsequent health and developmental trajectories.  Because gestation is a particularly sensitive period when body systems are first forming, insults or exposures during this period may have profound downstream effects. Much of Dr. Barrett’s research focuses on prenatal exposure to endocrine disruptors, agents which interfere with the normal activity of hormones in the body. Phthalates are a class of endocrine disrupting chemicals that are found widely in food and consumer products. Nearly 100% of Americans have measurable levels of phthalate metabolites in their bodies, yet our current understanding of how these chemicals affect our bodies is limited. In The Infant Development and the Environment Study (TIDES), Dr. Barrett and colleagues are studying how prenatal exposure to these chemicals impacts reproductive and neuro-development, and whether the effects may differ in boys and girls.

Other exposures, such as psychosocial stress, disrupt early development as well. Numerous studies have examined how stress during pregnancy may alter cortisol activity and “program” neurodevelopmental, metabolic, and immune outcomes. Much less is known about the extent to which prenatal stress (and related constructs, like anxiety) may also act through other pathways and mechanisms to affect the fetus. For example, evidence from animal models and humans suggests that prenatal stress may alter in utero androgen activity, thereby affecting sex-dependent development in the offspring. Dr. Barrett and collaborators are exploring this hypothesis in the Understanding Prenatal Signals and Infant Development (UPSIDE) Study, with an eye towards better understanding the early origins of sex differences. Concurrent work in this cohort will examine how maternal inflammation during pregnancy contributes to infant and child development. One of the major themes of this research is understanding the role of the placenta in communicating messages about stressors from mother to fetus (and vice versa).

In addition to her work on prenatal exposures, Dr. Barrett is also interested in factors that impact fertility in adulthood, particularly in women. She is involved in projects focused on how psychosocial stress and environmental chemical exposures affect reproductive hormone concentrations and pregnancy outcomes. Additional ongoing work examines possible biomarkers of the prenatal hormonal milieu that can be assessed postnatally, and their relationship to measures of adult reproductive health.

Dr. Barrett’s work is funded by the National Institutes of Health (R01HD083369; R01ES016863; UG3OD023349; UG3OD023271; P30ES001247) and the Mae Stone Goode Foundation.

Research Highlights

  • Assessment of exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals during pregnancy in relation to reproductive and neurodevelopment in childhood
  • Examination of maternal stress in relation to sex differences in the offspring
  • Investigation of novel biomarkers of the prenatal hormonal milieu in humans
  • Exploration of placental morphology and function in relation to prenatal exposures and postnatal outcomes
  • Identification of factors contributing to reproductive health and ovarian function in fertile and infertile women

Scholarly Activities

  • Editorial Board: Hormones and Behavior, Fertility and Sterility (Top 3 reviewer, 2015-2016)
  • Building Interdisciplinary Research Careers in Women’s Health (BIRCWH) Scholar (NIH K12; 2011-2014)
  • Environmental Health News Science Communications Fellow (2009-2010)
  • Community Advisory Board, URMC Environmental Health Sciences Center (2009-2016)
  • Board of Directors, Healthy Baby Network (2015-2016)

Recent Publications

  1. Ni, Y, Szpiro, AA, Loftus, CT, Workman, T, Sullivan, A, Wallace, ER, Riederer, AM, Day, DB, Murphy, LE, Nguyen, RHN et al.. Prenatal exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and executive functions at school age: Results from a combined cohort study. Int J Hyg Environ Health. 2024;260 :114407. doi: 10.1016/j.ijheh.2024.114407. PubMed PMID:38879913
  2. Kinkade, CW, Aleksunes, LM, Brinker, A, Buckley, B, Brunner, J, Wang, C, Miller, RK, O'Connor, TG, Rivera-Núñez, Z, Barrett, ES et al.. Associations between mycoestrogen exposure and sex steroid hormone concentrations in maternal serum and cord blood in the UPSIDE pregnancy cohort. Int J Hyg Environ Health. 2024;260 :114405. doi: 10.1016/j.ijheh.2024.114405. PubMed PMID:38878407
  3. Ni, Y, Sullivan, A, Szpiro, AA, Peng, J, Loftus, CT, Hazlehurst, MF, Sherris, A, Wallace, ER, Murphy, LE, Nguyen, RHN et al.. Air Pollution Exposures and Child Executive Function: A U.S. Multi-Cohort Study. Epidemiology. 2024; :. doi: 10.1097/EDE.0000000000001754. PubMed PMID:38871635
  4. Shah, RG, Salafia, CM, Girardi, T, Rukat, C, Brunner, J, Barrett, ES, O'Connor, TG, Misra, DP, Miller, RK, program collaborators for Environmental influences on Child Health Outcomes et al.. Maternal affective symptoms and sleep quality have sex-specific associations with placental topography. J Affect Disord. 2024;360 :62-70. doi: 10.1016/j.jad.2024.05.108. PubMed PMID:38806063
  5. Haque, U, Bukhari, MH, Fiedler, N, Wang, S, Korzh, O, Espinoza, J, Ahmad, M, Holovanova, I, Chumachenko, T, Marchak, O et al.. A Comparison of Ukrainian Hospital Services and Functions Before and During the Russia-Ukraine War. JAMA Health Forum. 2024;5 (5):e240901. doi: 10.1001/jamahealthforum.2024.0901. PubMed PMID:38758566 PubMed Central PMC11102023
  6. Meeker, JD, McArthur, KL, Adibi, JJ, Alshawabkeh, AN, Barrett, ES, Brubaker, SG, Cordero, JF, Dabelea, D, Dunlop, AL, Herbstman, JB et al.. Urinary concentrations of phthalate metabolites in relation to preeclampsia and other hypertensive disorders of pregnancy in the environmental influences on child health outcomes (ECHO) program. Environ Int. 2024;187 :108678. doi: 10.1016/j.envint.2024.108678. PubMed PMID:38696977
  7. Long, SE, Sood, S, Kanesa-Thasan, A, Kahn, LG, Urbina, EM, Barrett, ES, Nguyen, RH, Bush, NR, Swan, SH, Sathyanarayana, S et al.. Longitudinal study of birthweight, blood pressure, and markers of arterial stiffness in children age six among the TIDES cohort. J Hypertens. 2024; :. doi: 10.1097/HJH.0000000000003745. PubMed PMID:38690915
  8. Meng, Y, Thornburg, L, Dreisbach, C, Orzolek, C, Kautz, A, Murphy, H, Rivera-Núñez, Z, Wang, C, Miller, R, O'Connor, T et al.. The role of prenatal maternal sex steroid hormones in weight and adiposity at birth and growth trajectories during infancy. Res Sq. 2024; :. doi: 10.21203/rs.3.rs-4178000/v1. PubMed PMID:38659862 PubMed Central PMC11042427
  9. Scheible, K, Beblavy, R, Sohn, MB, Qui, X, Gill, AL, Narvaez-Miranda, J, Brunner, J, Miller, RK, Barrett, ES, O'Connor, TG et al.. Affective Symptoms in Pregnancy are Associated with the Vaginal Microbiome. bioRxiv. 2024; :. doi: 10.1101/2024.04.12.589254. PubMed PMID:38645042 PubMed Central PMC11030453
  10. Liang, HW, Koistinen, H, Barrett, ES, Xun, X, Yin, Q, Kannan, K, Moog, NK, Ng, C, O'Connor, TG, Miller, R et al.. Associations of Serum Perfluoroalkyl Substances and Placental Human Chorionic Gonadotropin in Early Pregnancy, Measured in the UPSIDE Study in Rochester, New York. Environ Health Perspect. 2024;132 (4):47008. doi: 10.1289/EHP12950. PubMed PMID:38625811 PubMed Central PMC11020022
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Photo of William Belden Ph.D.
William Belden, Ph.D.
Associate Professor Rutgers UniversitySchool of Environmental and Biological Sciences- Department of Animal Science
Photo of Joan Bennett Ph.D.
Joan Bennett, Ph.D.
Rutgers UniversityPlant Biology and Pathology – School of Environmental and Biological Sciences

Joan Wennstrom Bennett has been a Distinguished Professor of Plant Biology and Pathology at Rutgers University since 2006. Prior to coming to Rutgers, she was on the faculty at Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana, for over thirty years. The Bennett laboratory studies the genetics and physiology of filamentous fungi. In addition to mycotoxins and other secondary metabolites, research focuses on the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted by fungi. These low molecular weight compounds are responsible for the familiar odors associated with the molds and mushrooms. Some VOCs function as semiochemicals for insects while others serve as developmental signals for fungi. The Bennett lab has tested individual fungal VOCs in model systems and found that 1-octen-3-ol (“mushroom alcohol”) is a neurotoxin in Drosophila melanogaster and causes growth retardation in Arabidopsis thaliana. It also inhibits growth of the fungus that causes “white nose syndrome” in bat populations. In other studies, the Bennett lab has demonstrated that VOCs from living cultures of Trichoderma, a known biocontrol fungus, can enhance plant growth. Investigations on the mechanistic aspects of fungal VOC action are underway using a yeast knock out library. Dr. Bennett also has an active interest in fungal genomics and has been involved in genome projects for Aspergillus flavus, A. fumigatus, A. oryzae and Penicillium expansum.

Dr. Bennett was Associate Vice President for the Office for the Promotion of Women in Science, Engineering and Mathematics (“SciWomen”) at Rutgers from 2006-2014 and continues to serve as Senior Faculty Advisor to the group. She is a past Editor-in-Chief of Mycologia; a past Vice President of the British Mycological Society and the International Union of Microbiological Societies; as well as past President of the American Society for Microbiology and the Society for Industrial Microbiology & Biotechnology. She was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 2005.

Title and Address:
Distinguished Professor
Department of Plant Biology
School of Environmental and Biological Sciences,
Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
Primary Focus Area: Fungal metabolism and fungal genetics
Secondary Focus Area: History of science, women in science and bioethics

Photo of Alison Bernstein Ph.D.
Alison Bernstein, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor Rutgers UniversityEOHSI – Toxicology
Photo of Kathleen Black Ph.D., MPH
Kathleen Black, Ph.D., MPH
Program Manager Rutgers UniversityEOHSI – Clinical Research and Occupational Medicine
Photo of Martin J Blaser M.D.
Martin J Blaser, M.D.
Porfessor – Director of CABM Rutgers UniversityCenter for Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine – Rutgers Behavioral Health Systems

Martin J. Blaser holds the Henry Rutgers Chair of the Human Microbiome at Rutgers University, where he also serves as Professor of Medicine and Microbiology, and as Director of the Center for Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine.  Previously, he served as Chair of the Department of Medicine at New York University. A physician and microbiologist, Dr. Blaser has been studying the relationships we have with our persistently colonizing bacteria. His work over 30 years focused on Campylobacter species and Helicobacter pylori, which also are model systems for understanding the interactions of residential bacteria with their hosts. Over the last 20 years, he has also been actively studying the relationship of the human microbiome with health and important diseases including asthma, obesity, diabetes, and cancer. Dr. Blaser has served as the advisor to many students, post-doctoral fellows, and junior faculty. He currently serves as Chair of the Presidential Advisory Council for Combating Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria (PACCARB). He holds 28 U.S. patents, and has authored over 600 original articles. He wrote Missing Microbes, a book targeted to general audiences, now translated into 20 languages.

Martin J. Blaser, MD

Photo of Erik Bopp M.S.
Erik Bopp, M.S.
Rutgers UniversityEOHSI – Central Administration
Photo of Kristin Borbely
Kristin Borbely
Rutgers UniversityEOHSI – Toxicology
Photo of Anita Brinker
Anita Brinker
Instrument Specialist Rutgers UniversityEOHSI- Central Administration
Photo of Brian Buckley Ph.D.
Brian Buckley, Ph.D.
Executive Director of Laboratories, Associate Director of Administration Rutgers UniversityEOHSI – Central Administration, CAF, Toxicology

Dr. Buckley’s Complete List of Publications (PDF)

Recent Publications

  1. Kinkade, CW, Aleksunes, LM, Brinker, A, Buckley, B, Brunner, J, Wang, C, Miller, RK, O'Connor, TG, Rivera-Núñez, Z, Barrett, ES et al.. Associations between mycoestrogen exposure and sex steroid hormone concentrations in maternal serum and cord blood in the UPSIDE pregnancy cohort. Int J Hyg Environ Health. 2024;260 :114405. doi: 10.1016/j.ijheh.2024.114405. PubMed PMID:38878407
  2. Chow, MD, Otersen, K, Wassef, A, Kong, B, Yamarthy, S, Rizzolo, D, Yang, I, Buckley, B, Lu, A, Crook, N et al.. Effects of intestine-specific deletion of FGF15 on the development of fatty liver disease with vertical sleeve gastrectomy. Hepatol Commun. 2024;8 (6):. doi: 10.1097/HC9.0000000000000444. PubMed PMID:38780301 PubMed Central PMC11124683
  3. Taylor, R, Yang, Z, Henry, Z, Capece, G, Meadows, V, Otersen, K, Basaly, V, Bhattacharya, A, Mera, S, Zhou, P et al.. Characterization of individual bile acids in vivo utilizing a novel low bile acid mouse model. Toxicol Sci. 2024;199 (2):316-331. doi: 10.1093/toxsci/kfae029. PubMed PMID:38526215
  4. Kozlosky, D, Doherty, C, Buckley, B, Goedken, MJ, Miller, RK, Huh, DD, Barrett, ES, Aleksunes, LM. Fetoplacental Disposition and Toxicity of Cadmium in Mice Lacking the Bcrp Transporter. Toxicol Sci. 2023;197 (2):132-46. doi: 10.1093/toxsci/kfad115. PubMed PMID:37941438 PubMed Central PMC10823776
  5. Zhang, R, Walker, L, Wen, X, Doherty, C, Gorczyca, L, Buckley, B, Barrett, ES, Aleksunes, LM. Placental BCRP transporter reduces cadmium accumulation and toxicity in immortalized human trophoblasts. Reprod Toxicol. 2023;121 :108466. doi: 10.1016/j.reprotox.2023.108466. PubMed PMID:37660740 PubMed Central PMC10591833
  6. Rivera-Núñez, Z, Hansel, M, Capurro, C, Kozlosky, D, Wang, C, Doherty, CL, Buckley, B, Ohman-Strickland, P, Miller, RK, O'Connor, TG et al.. Prenatal Cadmium Exposure and Maternal Sex Steroid Hormone Concentrations across Pregnancy. Toxics. 2023;11 (7):. doi: 10.3390/toxics11070589. PubMed PMID:37505555 PubMed Central PMC10384739
  7. Kozlosky, D, Lu, A, Doherty, C, Buckley, B, Goedken, MJ, Miller, RK, Barrett, ES, Aleksunes, LM. Cadmium reduces growth of male fetuses by impairing development of the placental vasculature and reducing expression of nutrient transporters. Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 2023;475 :116636. doi: 10.1016/j.taap.2023.116636. PubMed PMID:37487938 PubMed Central PMC10528997
  8. Lazofsky, A, Brinker, A, Gupta, R, Barrett, E, Aleksunes, LM, Rivera-Núñez, Z, Buckley, B. Optimized extraction and analysis methods using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for zearalenone and metabolites in human placental tissue. Heliyon. 2023;9 (6):e16940. doi: 10.1016/j.heliyon.2023.e16940. PubMed PMID:37484340 PubMed Central PMC10361036
  9. Lazofsky, A, Brinker, A, Rivera-Núñez, Z, Buckley, B. A comparison of four liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry platforms for the analysis of zeranols in urine. Anal Bioanal Chem. 2023;415 (20):4885-4899. doi: 10.1007/s00216-023-04791-8. PubMed PMID:37432442 PubMed Central PMC10386926
  10. Coyte, RM, Darrah, T, Olesik, J, Barrett, E, O'Connor, TG, Brunner, J, Love, T, Perez-D'Gregorio, R, Wang, HZ, Aleksunes, LM et al.. Gadolinium during human pregnancy following administration of gadolinium chelate before pregnancy. Birth Defects Res. 2023;115 (14):1264-1273. doi: 10.1002/bdr2.2209. PubMed PMID:37334869
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See complete list of Dr. Buckley’s publications in PubMed

 

Photo of Joanna Burger Ph.D.
Joanna Burger, Ph.D.
Rutgers University – School of Arts and SciencesEOHSI – Environmental and Population Health Bio-Sciences

Research Areas
Main research interests are behavior and ecology of communities, behavioral eco-toxicology, ecological risk, environmental monitoring and assessment, human health effects of fish consumption, ecological implications of environmental justice, ecological impacts of energy alternatives, and stakeholder involvement in environmental decisions. My research involves understanding the effects and interactions of animals and people with respect to environmental degradation, chemical and radionuclide contamination, habitat destruction, and the disproportionate burden on some populations. One focus is on the levels and effects of pollutants on eco-receptors and on humans, especially from mercury in fish. This involves not only examining levels of contaminants, but assessing consumption patterns, perceptions of the public, and management of those risks.

Another significant research area is working with The Department of Energy on ecological health and risk at their facilities as part of the Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation.

Research Highlights

  • Understanding contaminant levels in salt water fish from New Jersey, consumption patterns of fishers, perceptions of risk from contaminants in these fish, and resultant risk from mercury.
  • Development of a conceptual model for unique exposures of low-income, minority and other environmental justice communities.
  • Development of a template for fate and transport, ecological, and human health information needed to assess safety of contaminated sites or new nuclear facilities.
  • Assessment of the relationship between selenium and mercury in salt water fish (selenium is thought to be protective for mercury exposure).
  • Biomonitoring of mercury, lead and cadmium in eggs of Common Terns in NJ from 1971 to the present.
    Development of a Conservation Plan for Pine Snakes in the NJ Pine Barrens.

Scholarly Activities

  •  Participate (and present papers) in EPA conference on Environmental Justice
  • Organizing and eiting a book on Science and Stakeholders: Finding Solutions to Environmental and Energy-related Problems.
  • Participate and present papers in EPA Fish Forum conference.
  • Work with the Department of Energy (through CRESP) on ensuring ecological and human health around current nuclear facilities, with implications for commercial nuclear.
  • Serve on the Altamont, California Scientific Review Committee for wind energy.
  • Provide ecological advice to BP and others concerning the recent Gulf Oil Spill.

Recent Publications

  1. Burger, J, Jeitner, C, Zappalorti, RT, Bunnell, JF, Ng, K, DeVito, E, Schneider, D, Gochfeld, M. Snake Fungal Disease in Free-Ranging Northern Pine Snakes (Pituophis melanoleucus melanoleucus) in New Jersey: Lesions, Severity of Sores and Investigator's Perceptions. J Fungi (Basel). 2024;10 (2):. doi: 10.3390/jof10020125. PubMed PMID:38392797 PubMed Central PMC10889963
  2. Burger, J, Feigin, S, Fojtik, A, Dey, A, Ng, K. Bioaccumulation of Some Metals and Metalloids in Laughing Gulls (Leucophaeus atricilla): Increases in Mercury and Decreases in Selenium from 2019 to 2022/2023. Toxics. 2023;11 (12):. doi: 10.3390/toxics11121007. PubMed PMID:38133408 PubMed Central PMC10748039
  3. Burger, J, Gochfeld, M, Brown, KG, Ng, K, Cortes, M, Kosson, D. The importance of recognizing Buffer Zones to lands being developed, restored, or remediated: on planning for protection of ecological resources. J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2024;87 (4):133-149. doi: 10.1080/15287394.2023.2285511. PubMed PMID:37997947 PubMed Central PMC10843829
  4. Burger, J, Feigin, S, Ng, K, Jeitner, C, Tsipoura, N, Niles, L, Gochfeld, M. Some metals and metalloids in the blood of three species of shorebirds increase while foraging during two-week migratory stopover in Delaware Bay, New Jersey. Environ Res. 2023;238 (Pt 2):117194. doi: 10.1016/j.envres.2023.117194. PubMed PMID:37748669 PubMed Central PMC10841762
  5. Burger, J. Metal Levels in Delaware Bay Horseshoe Crab Eggs from the Surface Reflect Metals in Egg Clutches Laid beneath the Sand. Toxics. 2023;11 (7):. doi: 10.3390/toxics11070614. PubMed PMID:37505579 PubMed Central PMC10386046
  6. Burger, J, Gochfeld, M, Giffen, N, Brown, KG, Cortes, M, Ng, K, Kosson, DS. Comparing land cover and interior forests on contaminated land and the surrounding region: Oak Ridge Reservation as a case study. J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2023;86 (15):501-517. doi: 10.1080/15287394.2023.2223231. PubMed PMID:37335075
  7. Burger, J, Gochfeld, M, Zappalorti, R, Bunnell, J, Jeitner, C, Schneider, D, Ng, K, DeVito, E, Lorch, JM. Prevalence of Ophidiomyces ophidiicola and epizootiology of snake fungal disease in free-ranging Northern Pine Snakes (Pituophis melanoleucus melanoleucus) in New Jersey. Environ Monit Assess. 2023;195 (6):662. doi: 10.1007/s10661-023-11259-w. PubMed PMID:37169998
  8. Burger, J, Greenberg, M, Lowrie, K, Goldstein, BD. Bernard D. Goldstein-Risk communication as an essential component of public health practice. Risk Anal. 2022;42 (11):2459-2463. doi: 10.1111/risa.14055. PubMed PMID:36625059 PubMed Central PMC10316670
  9. Burger, J, Greenberg, M, Lowrie, K, Berlin, K. Ken Berlin-Climate science, risk, and solutions must be communicated together. Risk Anal. 2022;42 (11):2531-2535. doi: 10.1111/risa.14034. PubMed PMID:36625058 PubMed Central PMC10316665
  10. Burger, J, Greenberg, M, Lowrie, K, Safina, C. Carl Safina-Provide your audience with information they care about. Risk Anal. 2022;42 (11):2525-2530. doi: 10.1111/risa.14056. PubMed PMID:36625057 PubMed Central PMC10316667
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See complete list of Dr. Burger’s publications

 

 

 

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Stephen K Burley, M.D.
Professor and Henry Rutgers Chair Rutgers UniversityCenter for Integrative Proteomics Research

Scholar Page

Awards & Honors

  • Director, Center for Integrative Proteomics Research (CIPR)
  • Director, Research Collaboratory for Structural Bioinformatics Protein Data Bank (RCSB PDB)
  • Founding Director, Institute for Quantitative Biomedicine at Rutgers (iQB@R)
  • Senator, Rutgers University Senate
  • Distinguished Professor, Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology
  • Member, Cancer Institute of New Jersey

Research Summary

Stephen Burley currently serves as Henry Rutgers Chair and University Professor, Founding Director of the Institute for Quantitative Biomedicine, and Director of the RCSB Protein Data Bank at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey. He is also a Member of the Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, where he Co-Leads the Cancer Pharmacology Research Program. Burley is an expert in structural biology, proteomics, bioinformatics, structure/fragment based drug discovery, and clinical medicine/oncology.

From 2008 to 2012, Burley was a Distinguished Lilly Research Scholar in Lilly Research Laboratories. Prior to joining Lilly, Burley served as the Chief Scientific Officer and Senior Vice President of SGX Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a publicly traded biotechnology company that was acquired by Lilly in 2008. Until 2002, Burley was the Richard M. and Isabel P. Furlaud Professor at The Rockefeller University and an Investigator in the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.

He has authored/coauthored more than 280 scholarly scientific articles. Following undergraduate training in applied mathematics and physics, Burley received an M.D. degree from Harvard Medical School in the joint Harvard-MIT Health Sciences and Technology Program and, as a Rhodes Scholar, received a D.Phil. in Structural Biology from Oxford University. He trained in internal medicine at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, and did post-doctoral work with Gregory A. Petsko at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Nobel Laureate William N. Lipscomb, Jr. at Harvard University. With William J. Rutter and others at the University of California San Francisco and Rockefeller, Burley co-founded Prospect Genomics, Inc., which was acquired by SGX in 2001. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada and of the New York Academy of Sciences, and recipient of a Doctor of Science (Honoris causa) from his alma mater the University of Western Ontario.

 

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Kerry Butch
Program Specialist Rutgers UniversityEOHSI – Toxicology
Photo of Leonardo Calderon
Leonardo Calderon
Ph.D. Student Advisor: Dr. Gediminas Mainelis
Julie Caruth, MD, MPH, FAAFP
Director of Employee Health Services Rutgers-RBHS Employee HealthEOHSI – CROM
Photo of Jose Guillermo Cedeno Laurent MSc, ScD
Jose Guillermo Cedeno Laurent, MSc, ScD
Assistant Professor Rutgers UniversityEOHSI – Environmental and Population Health Bisociences
Jessica Cervelli
Rutgers UniversityEOHSI – Toxicology
Adam Cesmebasi, MD
Resident Rutgers UniversityEOHSI- Clinical Research and Occupational Medicine
Photo of Milton Chandra Das PhD
Milton Chandra Das, PhD
Postdoc Fellow Rutgers UniversityEOHSI – Environmental and Population Health Biosciences Division
Photo of Suzie Chen Ph.D.
Suzie Chen, Ph.D.
Distinguished Professor Rutgers – Ernest Mario School of PharmacyEOHSI – Toxicology

Research Areas

The main interest in my laboratory is to study the molecular mechanisms of melanoma development using a line of transgenic mice (TG-3) generated in my lab several years ago. From mapping studies, we have determined that about 70 kb of host sequences have been deleted by the insertion of the transgene. The host DNA had been deleted from a region of mouse chromosome 10 which is syntenic to the long arm of human chromosome 6. This region of human chromosome 6 has been shown to be highly rearranged in a large number of human nonfamilial malignant melanomas. A combination of techniques were used to identify intron 3 of metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (Grm1) as the gene disrupted by the insertion of the transgene. The metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) belong to a family of seven transmembrane domain, G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). Expression of mGluRs is usually restricted to neuronal cells, but the signaling pathways activated by these receptors are widely distributed in both neural and non-neural cells. Mice with null mutations in Grm1 display reductions in hippocampal long term potentiation, and abnormalities of motor coordination and associative learning. In the TG-3 line, we showed that Grm1 is expressed only in ear tumors, but not normal ear as demonstrated by semi-quantitative RT-PCR, Western immunoblots, immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry. Co-localization of Grm1 and the melanocyte-marker Tyrp-1 was detected only in tumors and not in the normal counterparts. Based on these results, a new transgenic line was generated with targeted Grm1 expression to melanocytes, by using Grm1 cDNA under the melanocyte-specific Dct (dopachrome tautomerase) promoter. Founder of Dct-Grm1 exhibited melanotic tumors on the tail at 7.5 months of age. High levels of Grm1 expression were observed in tail tumors but not in normal tail. Histopathological analysis showed these tumors to be very similar to those of TG-3. These results provide the compelling evidence suggesting the improtance of Grm1 signaling in melanocytic neoplasia.

Together with Dr. J. Goydos at CINJ, we begin to explore the potential role of the aberrant expression of Grm1 in human melanoma development and progression. Our data on human melanoma biopsy samples (7/19) showed expression of Grm1. Grm1 expression was not detected in two benign nevi and one normal skin samples. Similar analyses were also done with 18 human melanoma cell lines, 12/18 of these cell lines showed Grm1 expression, these results were confirmed by immunofluorescence. Co-localization of Grm1 and Tyrp1 (a melanocyte-specific marker) was detected only in lines that also showed Grm1 expression.

Research Highlights

  • Melanoma research
  • Melanoma research from bench to the clinic.

Scholarly Activities

  • 2014 – present Council member of PanAmerican Society for Pigment Cell Research
  • 2011 – present VA Oncology Study Section
  • 2004 – present Member, NCI Special Emphasis Panel
  • 2000 – present Planning and Review Committee for the Annual Retreat on Cancer Research
  • 2004-2010 National Institute of Health Grant
  • 2007-2012 National Institute of Health Grant
  • 2009-2011 State of New Jersey Commission on Cancer Research Grant

Recent Publications

  1. Pompili, SVB, Fanzini, S, Schachner, M, Chen, S. In Vitro and In Vivo Studies of Melanoma Cell Migration by Antagonistic Mimetics of Adhesion Molecule L1CAM. Int J Mol Sci. 2024;25 (9):. doi: 10.3390/ijms25094811. PubMed PMID:38732030 PubMed Central PMC11084881
  2. Fateeva, A, Eddy, K, Chen, S. Current State of Melanoma Therapy and Next Steps: Battling Therapeutic Resistance. Cancers (Basel). 2024;16 (8):. doi: 10.3390/cancers16081571. PubMed PMID:38672652 PubMed Central PMC11049326
  3. Fateeva, A, Chen, S. Study on the Complex Melanoma. Cancers (Basel). 2024;16 (5):. doi: 10.3390/cancers16050843. PubMed PMID:38473205 PubMed Central PMC10931287
  4. Eddy, K, Gupta, K, Eddin, MN, Marinaro, C, Putta, S, Sauer, JM Jr, Chaly, A, Freeman, KB, Pelletier, JC, Fateeva, A et al.. Assessing Longitudinal Treatment Efficacies and Alterations in Molecular Markers Associated with Glutamatergic Signaling and Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors in a Spontaneous Melanoma Mouse Model. JID Innov. 2024;4 (2):100262. doi: 10.1016/j.xjidi.2024.100262. PubMed PMID:38445232 PubMed Central PMC10914525
  5. Fateeva, A, Eddy, K, Chen, S. Overview of current melanoma therapies. Pigment Cell Melanoma Res. 2023; :. doi: 10.1111/pcmr.13154. PubMed PMID:38063139 PubMed Central PMC11161550
  6. Fateeva, A, Chen, S. Editorial: The role of immunotherapy in melanomas. Front Oncol. 2023;13 :1293040. doi: 10.3389/fonc.2023.1293040. PubMed PMID:37841439 PubMed Central PMC10569413
  7. Spencer, KR, Portal, DE, Aisner, J, Stein, MN, Malhotra, J, Shih, W, Chan, N, Silk, AW, Ganesan, S, Goodin, S et al.. A phase I trial of riluzole and sorafenib in patients with advanced solid tumors: CTEP #8850. Oncotarget. 2023;14 :302-315. doi: 10.18632/oncotarget.28403. PubMed PMID:37036756 PubMed Central PMC10085060
  8. Eddy, K, Gupta, K, Pelletier, JC, Isola, AL, Marinaro, C, Rasheed, MA, Campagnolo, J, Eddin, MN, Rossi, M, Fateeva, A et al.. A Spontaneous Melanoma Mouse Model Applicable for a Longitudinal Chemotherapy and Immunotherapy Study. J Invest Dermatol. 2023;143 (10):2007-2018.e6. doi: 10.1016/j.jid.2023.03.1664. PubMed PMID:36997110 PubMed Central PMC10524215
  9. Eddy, K, Eddin, MN, Fateeva, A, Pompili, SVB, Shah, R, Doshi, S, Chen, S. Implications of a Neuronal Receptor Family, Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors, in Cancer Development and Progression. Cells. 2022;11 (18):. doi: 10.3390/cells11182857. PubMed PMID:36139432 PubMed Central PMC9496915
  10. Silk, AW, Saraiya, B, Groisberg, R, Chan, N, Spencer, K, Girda, E, Shih, W, Palmeri, M, Saunders, T, Berman, RM et al.. A phase Ib dose-escalation study of troriluzole (BHV-4157), an oral glutamatergic signaling modulator, in combination with nivolumab in patients with advanced solid tumors. Eur J Med Res. 2022;27 (1):107. doi: 10.1186/s40001-022-00732-w. PubMed PMID:35780243 PubMed Central PMC9250196
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Linda Christiansen, RN, COHN
Staff Nurse Rutgers UniversityEOHSI – Clinical Research and Occupational Medicine
Tina Cirillo
Rutgers UniversityEOHSI – Clinical Research and Occupational Medicine
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Breann Coffaro
Ph.D. Student Advisor: Dr. Clifford Weisel
Michael Colantuono
Assistant Building Manager EOHSI – Central Administration
Photo of Keith R Cooper Ph.D.
Keith R Cooper, Ph.D.
Deputy Director of Government Relations Rutgers University – School of Environmental and Biological SciencesEOHSI – Toxicology
  • B.S. (Biology), College of William and Mary, 1973
  • M.S. (Marine Biology), Texas A&M University, 1976
  • Ph.D. (Animal Pathology), University of Rhode Island, 1979
  • M.S. (Industrial Toxicology), Thomas Jefferson University, 1981

Research Areas

Xenobiotic metabolism in aquatic animals

Studies are currently examining the effects of endocrine disrupting compounds on finish and bivalve mollusks. The compounds of current interest include dioxin-like compounds and phthalates. The model systems used for these studies include the Japanese Medaka, winter flounder and the American oyster. The research on the finish involves the development of multigenerational studies examining the effects at multiple levels of organization from biochemical to population endpoints. The studies on the American oyster are examining the effects on gonadal development and larval development. Both food web and physiological based pharmacokinetic models are also being developed to better predict chemical movement both in the environment as well as within the organism of concern. The overall research in the laboratory is centered around comparative toxicology.

Research Highlights

  • Toxicity of bisphenol A and its derivatives in the zebrafish embryo model
  • Reproductive neurotoxicity of pyrethroid insecticides
  • Effects of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (2,3,7,8-TCDD) on gametogenesis

Recent Publications

  1. Karas, BF, Doherty, CL, Terez, KR, Côrte-Real, L, Cooper, KR, Buckley, BT. Dose Uptake of Platinum- and Ruthenium-based Compound Exposure in Zebrafish by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry with Broader Applications. J Vis Exp. 2022; (182):. doi: 10.3791/63587. PubMed PMID:35532272 PubMed Central PMC9281581
  2. Karas, BF, Hotz, JM, Gural, BM, Terez, KR, DiBona, VL, Côrte-Real, L, Valente, A, Buckley, BT, Cooper, KR. Anticancer Activity and In Vitro to In Vivo Mechanistic Recapitulation of Novel Ruthenium-Based Metallodrugs in the Zebrafish Model. Toxicol Sci. 2021;182 (1):29-43. doi: 10.1093/toxsci/kfab041. PubMed PMID:33822233 PubMed Central PMC8285015
  3. Karas, BF, Hotz, JM, Buckley, BT, Cooper, KR. Cisplatin alkylating activity in zebrafish causes resistance to chorionic degradation and inhibition of osteogenesis. Aquat Toxicol. 2020;229 :105656. doi: 10.1016/j.aquatox.2020.105656. PubMed PMID:33075613 PubMed Central PMC9210937
  4. Cooper, KR, Gleason, JA, Post, GB. Letter. Regul Toxicol Pharmacol. 2020;111 :104503. doi: 10.1016/j.yrtph.2019.104503. PubMed PMID:31704257
  5. Côrte-Real, L, Karas, B, Brás, AR, Pilon, A, Avecilla, F, Marques, F, Preto, A, Buckley, BT, Cooper, KR, Doherty, C et al.. Ruthenium-Cyclopentadienyl Bipyridine-Biotin Based Compounds: Synthesis and Biological Effect. Inorg Chem. 2019;58 (14):9135-9149. doi: 10.1021/acs.inorgchem.9b00735. PubMed PMID:31241925
  6. Karas, BF, Côrte-Real, L, Doherty, CL, Valente, A, Cooper, KR, Buckley, BT. A novel screening method for transition metal-based anticancer compounds using zebrafish embryo-larval assay and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry analysis. J Appl Toxicol. 2019;39 (8):1173-1180. doi: 10.1002/jat.3802. PubMed PMID:30963621 PubMed Central PMC6625851
  7. Annunziato, KM, Jantzen, CE, Gronske, MC, Cooper, KR. Subtle morphometric, behavioral and gene expression effects in larval zebrafish exposed to PFHxA, PFHxS and 6:2 FTOH. Aquat Toxicol. 2019;208 :126-137. doi: 10.1016/j.aquatox.2019.01.009. PubMed PMID:30669116 PubMed Central PMC6396680
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Maria Crecenzio, B.S., Ed.M.
Unit Computing Specialist Rutgers UniversityEOHSI – Central Administration
  • EOHSI Web Content Manager & Social Media Administrator
  • End-User Technical Support Specialist
  • Training Specialist & Instructional Material Designer
  • Audio-Visual Coordinator
Adriana De Resende
Clinical Research Coordinator II Rutgers UniversityEOHSI – Clinical Research and Occupational Medicine
Photo of Philip Demokritou Ph.D.
Philip Demokritou, Ph.D.
Henry Rutgers Chair and Professor in Nanoscience and Environmental Engineering School of Public Health – Rutgers UniversityEOHSI – Environmental and Population Health Bio-Sciences
Dr. Demokritou’s research interests are primarily in the areas of nano-aerosol science and technology with an emphasis on the interactions of particles with biological and environmental systems and elucidation of of   health effects. His particle research spans across the exposure-disease continuum and includes the development of personal monitoring (PM) systems for use in exposure assessment and epidemiological studies, methods for the physico-chemical and biological  characterization of particles. His current research focuses on interactions of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) with biological systems, assessing the nano-bio interface  and the role of ENM structure on bioactivity both in terms of nanosafety research and biomedical applications. His nanosafety research has involved development of in-vitro screening approaches for nano-specific effects (DNA damage, epigenetics, translocation of ENMs across biological barriers, etc), “safer-by-design” approaches for families of ENMs, development of advanced tools and framework approaches for in-vitro/in-vivo dosimetry, life cycle specific risk assessment studies for nano-enabled products (NEPs).  and fate of ENMs in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT).  His current nanoscience research also includes synthesis of nanomaterials using flame spray pyrolysis, nature derived biopolymers for agri-food applications and environmental nanotechnology applications for pathogen inactivation, sustainable food package materials and agri-chemical delivery using nature derived biopolymers. Dr. Demokritou is  the founding Director of two interdisciplinary research Centers at Harvard University: Harvard-NIEHS Nanosafety Research Center (http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nanosafety) and the Center for Nanotechnology and Nanotoxicology at (http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nano). He is also the founding Program Director for the Harvard-Nanyang Technological University/Singapore Sustainable Nanotechnology Initiative (2016-2022). He is also the founder of the Rutgers Nanoscience and Advanced Materials Research Center at Rutgers university. In the past, he served as a co-PI of the Harvard-EPA PM Health Effect Center (1999-2010, US EPA star grant) and the Director of the Harvard-Cyprus International Institute for the Environment and Public Health from 2005-2008.  He served as PI, co-PI, or co-investigator on several grants funded by NIH, EPA, NIOSH, NSF, USDA/NIFA, CPSC, and EU research framework (FP7). He holds more than a dozen of international/US patents and inventions. He is a co-author of two books, numerous book chapters, and more than 200 articles in leading journals in nanoscience, particle health effect, and aerosol engineering fields. Dr. Demokritou’s innovative research was highlighted in major mainstream media and online magazines, including articles published in the Economist, NanoWerk, Chemistry world, The Scientist, ACS C&EN News, MIT News, Harvard Gazette, and NPR news. Dr. Demokritou is currently the Henry Rutgers Chair and Professor in Nanoscience and Environmental Bioengineering at Rutgers School of Public health, Division Head at the Environmental Occupational Health Sciences Institute (EOHSI) and Vice Chair in the Department of Environmental Occupational Health and Justice at Rutgers School of Public health. Before joining Rutgers,  he was a Professor at TH Chan School of Public Health at Harvard University for 25 years. He is also a founding co-editor in chief of NanoImpact (Elsevier), a journal that focuses on all aspects of nanosafety research, and co-founder of DIETRICS.
Recent publications: https://scholar.google.com/citations?hl=en&user=k5jZk7EAAAAJ&view_op=list_works&sortby=pubdate

 

 

 

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Helene DeRisi
Grants & Contracts Analyst I EOHSI-Rutgers UniversityEOHSI – Environmental and Population Health Bio-Sciences
Photo of Emanuel DiCicco-Bloom M.D.
Emanuel DiCicco-Bloom, M.D.
Professor Rutgers UniversityDepartment of Neuroscience and Cell Biology – Child Health Institute of New Jersey

Gene and growth factor regulation of neurogenesis during mammalian brain development, with a focus on models of human neurodevelopmental disorders, including autism, schizophrenia and environmental teratogens. One direction of research explores the roles of extracellular growth factors, such as IGF1, bFGF and PACAP, in regulating proliferation of neural precursors in cerebral cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum, working via cell cycle machinery, especially cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors. Another area of interest examines the effects of environmental teratogens, including methylmercury and neurotherapeutic valproic acid, on neural stem cell proliferation in prenatal cortex and postnatal hippocampus, defining effects on proliferation and programmed cell death, as well as neurogenesis and behavioral consequences. Finally, we are defining the roles of the autism-associated gene, Engrailed 2, in development of cerebellum and hindbrain, as well as secondary effects on forebrain structure and functions. These studies are performed in neural stem cell cultures, and in embryonic and postnatal rodent brains, altering growth factors, genes and microRNAs by using knock out technology, gene over/under expression methods (transfection, in utero electroporation) and pharmacological approaches with subsequent analyses of mRNAs, proteins, cell and tissue morphology and animal behaviors.

Photo of Maria Gloria Dominguez-Bello
Maria Gloria Dominguez-Bello
Professor Rutgers University – SEBSDepartment of Biochemistry & Microbiology and Anthropology
Martin Duggan, DO
Resident Rutgers UniversityEOHSI – Clinical Research and Occupational Medicine
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Linda Everett
Department Administrator, Pharmacology and Toxicology Rutgers University – Ernest Mario School of PharmacyEOHSI – Toxicology
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Nancy Fiedler, Ph.D.
EOHSI- Deputy Director, Professor – Rutgers School of Public Health Rutgers University – School of Public HealthEOHSI – Clinical Research and Occupational Medicine

Research Areas

  • Controlled human exposure health effects studies, incorporating chemical exposures and psychological stress to model realistic environmental exposures.
  • Epidemiologic investigations of toxic encephalopathy among workers chronically exposed to solvents and lead with a focus on integrating neuropsychological testing, exposure assessment, and functional imaging.
  • Translational research to examine whether alteration in HPA axis function among lead exposed animals translates to humans chronically exposed to lead
  • International studies based in Thailand to investigate the cognitive and behavioral effects of pesticide exposure in a birth cohort

Research Highlights

  • Discovered a negative dose response relationship between lifetime solvent exposure and functional imaging activation patterns during performance of a working memory task.
  • Demonstrated neurobehavioral performance deficits among workers chronically exposed to solvents
  • Validated a lifetime solvent exposure index with neurobehavioral performance among workers chronically exposed to solvent mixtures
  • Current blood and bone lead alters hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis function among workers with lifetime exposure
  • Developing behavioral research capacity among public health students at Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand.

Scholarly Activities

  • Member of the Joint Graduate Program in Toxicology, Rutgers University
  • NIH Fogarty International Center Grant reviewer
  • Co-Chair for the New Jersey Alliance for Clinical and Translational Science Scientific Review Board
  • New Jersey Kids Study Co-Chair for neurodevelopmental assessment
  • EOHSI representative for the RBHS Mentor Committee
  • Chair for the EOHSI Faculty Search Committee

Recent Publications

Click here for additiional publications by Dr. Fiedler.

  1. Haque, U, Bukhari, MH, Fiedler, N, Wang, S, Korzh, O, Espinoza, J, Ahmad, M, Holovanova, I, Chumachenko, T, Marchak, O et al.. A Comparison of Ukrainian Hospital Services and Functions Before and During the Russia-Ukraine War. JAMA Health Forum. 2024;5 (5):e240901. doi: 10.1001/jamahealthforum.2024.0901. PubMed PMID:38758566 PubMed Central PMC11102023
  2. Wang, Y, Hermetz, K, Burt, A, Kennedy, EM, Lesseur, C, Panuwet, P, Fiedler, N, Prapamontol, T, Suttiwan, P, Naksen, W et al.. Placental transcriptome variation associated with season, location, and urinary prenatal pyrethroid metabolites of Thai farm-working women. Environ Pollut. 2024;349 :123873. doi: 10.1016/j.envpol.2024.123873. PubMed PMID:38554839 PubMed Central PMC11070292
  3. Dang, T, Sehgal, N, Barr, DB, Panuwet, P, Liang, D, Smarr, M, Naksen, W, Fiedler, N, Promkam, N, Prapamontol, T et al.. Association of prenatal chlorpyrifos exposure with sexually dimorphic differences in anogenital distance among Thai farmworker children. Environ Res. 2024;248 :118325. doi: 10.1016/j.envres.2024.118325. PubMed PMID:38286251 PubMed Central PMC11023773
  4. Nimmapirat, P, Fiedler, N, Suttiwan, P, Sullivan, MW, Ohman-Strickland, P, Panuwet, P, Barr, DB, Prapamontol, T, Naksen, W, SAWASDEE birth cohort investigative team et al.. Predictors of executive function among 2 year olds from a Thai birth cohort. Infant Behav Dev. 2024;74 :101916. doi: 10.1016/j.infbeh.2023.101916. PubMed PMID:38096613 PubMed Central PMC10947867
  5. Rattanawitoon, T, Siriwong, W, Shendell, D, Fiedler, N, Robson, MG. An Evaluation of a Pesticide Training Program to Reduce Pesticide Exposure and Enhance Safety among Female Farmworkers in Nan, Thailand. Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2023;20 (17):. doi: 10.3390/ijerph20176635. PubMed PMID:37681775 PubMed Central PMC10487852
  6. Li, Q, Lesseur, C, Srirangam, P, Kaur, K, Hermetz, K, Caudle, WM, Fiedler, N, Panuwet, P, Prapamontol, T, Naksen, W et al.. Associations between prenatal organophosphate pesticide exposure and placental gene networks. Environ Res. 2023;224 :115490. doi: 10.1016/j.envres.2023.115490. PubMed PMID:36828252 PubMed Central PMC10054353
  7. Liang, D, Batross, J, Fiedler, N, Prapamontol, T, Suttiwan, P, Panuwet, P, Naksen, W, Baumert, BO, Yakimavets, V, Tan, Y et al.. Metabolome-wide association study of the relationship between chlorpyrifos exposure and first trimester serum metabolite levels in pregnant Thai farmworkers. Environ Res. 2022;215 (Pt 2):114319. doi: 10.1016/j.envres.2022.114319. PubMed PMID:36108722 PubMed Central PMC9909724
  8. Baumert, BO, Fiedler, N, Prapamontol, T, Suttiwan, P, Naksen, W, Panuwet, P, Sittiwang, S, Dokjunyam, C, Smarr, MM, Marsit, CJ et al.. Investigation of Prenatal Pesticide Exposure and Neurodevelopmental Deficits in Northern Thailand: Protocol for a Longitudinal Birth Cohort Study. JMIR Res Protoc. 2022;11 (2):e31696. doi: 10.2196/31696. PubMed PMID:35129451 PubMed Central PMC8861866
  9. Sittiwang, S, Nimmapirat, P, Suttiwan, P, Promduang, W, Chaikittipornlert, N, Wouldes, T, Prapamontol, T, Naksen, W, Promkam, N, Pingwong, S et al.. The relationship between prenatal exposure to organophosphate insecticides and neurodevelopmental integrity of infants at 5-weeks of age. Front Epidemiol. 2022;2 :. doi: 10.3389/fepid.2022.1039922. PubMed PMID:36925965 PubMed Central PMC10016628
  10. Baumert, BO, Fiedler, N, Prapamontol, T, Naksen, W, Panuwet, P, Hongsibsong, S, Wongkampaun, A, Thongjan, N, Lee, G, Sittiwang, S et al.. Urinary Concentrations of Dialkylphosphate Metabolites of Organophosphate pesticides in the Study of Asian Women and their Offspring's Development and Environmental Exposures (SAWASDEE). Environ Int. 2022;158 :106884. doi: 10.1016/j.envint.2021.106884. PubMed PMID:34583095 PubMed Central PMC8688265
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Photo of Philip Furmanski Ph.D.
Philip Furmanski, Ph.D.
Distinguished Professor Rutgers University – Ernest Mario School of PharmacyEOHSI – Toxicology

Dr. Furmanski’s background is in cancer molecular and cell biology, mechanisms of tumor progression, experimental therapeutics of cancer and other invasive/infectious processes, preclinical and human clinical trials. He has expertise in a number of areas, including pathogenesis of environmental toxin-induced disease, role of macrophages in inflammatory processes related to environmental exposures, health effects of nanoparticles, genetic and epigenetic regulation of cellular functions, among others. As a result of long service to the scientific community on a number of Editorial Boards, grant review committees, advisory boards, he is very active as a mentor for junior faculty and those newly moving into the field (as well as more senior members) in many aspects of the scientific and administrative process, including interactions with industry (big pharma, biotech, materials and devices).

Scholarly Activities

  • Member and Inaugural Chair, Pathology C (Cancer Molecular Pathobiology/CAMP) Study Section, National Institutes of Health, June 2001 – October 2003
  • Member, Advisory Committee for Oncologic Sciences, Center for Scientific Review, National Institutes of Health, January – June 1999 – June 2000
  • Member, National Institutes of Health Reviewers Reserve, July 1993 – July 1998
  • Member, Pathology B Study Section, Division of Research Grants, National Institutes of Health, October 1988 – June 1993
  • Chairman, Cancer Biology and Immunology Contracts Review Committee, National Cancer                 Institute,   May 1985 – October 1987

Recent Publications

  1. Abratenko, P, Alterkait, O, Andrade Aldana, D, Anthony, J, Arellano, L, Asaadi, J, Ashkenazi, A, Balasubramanian, S, Baller, B, Barr, G et al.. First Measurement of η Meson Production in Neutrino Interactions on Argon with MicroBooNE. Phys Rev Lett. 2024;132 (15):151801. doi: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.132.151801. PubMed PMID:38683006
  2. Eddy, K, Gupta, K, Eddin, MN, Marinaro, C, Putta, S, Sauer, JM Jr, Chaly, A, Freeman, KB, Pelletier, JC, Fateeva, A et al.. Assessing Longitudinal Treatment Efficacies and Alterations in Molecular Markers Associated with Glutamatergic Signaling and Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors in a Spontaneous Melanoma Mouse Model. JID Innov. 2024;4 (2):100262. doi: 10.1016/j.xjidi.2024.100262. PubMed PMID:38445232 PubMed Central PMC10914525
  3. Abratenko, P, Alterkait, O, Andrade Aldana, D, Arellano, L, Asaadi, J, Ashkenazi, A, Balasubramanian, S, Baller, B, Barr, G, Barrow, D et al.. Search for Heavy Neutral Leptons in Electron-Positron and Neutral-Pion Final States with the MicroBooNE Detector. Phys Rev Lett. 2024;132 (4):041801. doi: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.132.041801. PubMed PMID:38335355
  4. Abratenko, P, Alterkait, O, Andrade Aldana, D, Anthony, J, Arellano, L, Asaadi, J, Ashkenazi, A, Balasubramanian, S, Baller, B, Barr, G et al.. First Double-Differential Measurement of Kinematic Imbalance in Neutrino Interactions with the MicroBooNE Detector. Phys Rev Lett. 2023;131 (10):101802. doi: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.131.101802. PubMed PMID:37739352
  5. Kabeya, V, Puthussery, S, Furmanski, A. Barriers and facilitators to genetic testing for breast and ovarian cancer amongst Black African women in Luton (UK). J Genet Couns. 2024;33 (2):425-444. doi: 10.1002/jgc4.1742. PubMed PMID:37403830
  6. Abratenko, P, Andrade Aldana, D, Anthony, J, Arellano, L, Asaadi, J, Ashkenazi, A, Balasubramanian, S, Baller, B, Barr, G, Barrow, J et al.. First Measurement of Quasielastic Λ Baryon Production in Muon Antineutrino Interactions in the MicroBooNE Detector. Phys Rev Lett. 2023;130 (23):231802. doi: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.130.231802. PubMed PMID:37354393
  7. Eddy, K, Gupta, K, Pelletier, JC, Isola, AL, Marinaro, C, Rasheed, MA, Campagnolo, J, Eddin, MN, Rossi, M, Fateeva, A et al.. A Spontaneous Melanoma Mouse Model Applicable for a Longitudinal Chemotherapy and Immunotherapy Study. J Invest Dermatol. 2023;143 (10):2007-2018.e6. doi: 10.1016/j.jid.2023.03.1664. PubMed PMID:36997110 PubMed Central PMC10524215
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Photo of Michael A. Gallo Ph.D., D.A.B.T.
Michael A. Gallo, Ph.D., D.A.B.T.
Professor Emeritus Rutgers UniversityEOHSI – Toxicology

Dr. Gallo is a Professor in the Rutgers-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine. He is a Diplomate of the American Board of Toxicology, and a Fellow of the Academy of Toxicological Sciences. Dr Gallo is an Adjunct Professor both in the School of Public Health and in the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology in the Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy of Rutgers University. He is a founding member of the Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute where he served as Director of Toxicology, and as Director of the NIEHS Center of Excellence. He was the founding Director of the Cancer Institute of New Jersey and Associate Dean for Research. Dr. Gallo is a renowned toxicologist with expertise in the area of dioxins and PCBs, experimental models in pharmacology and toxicology, cytoplasmic and cell surface receptors, hormone biology and mechanisms of hormonal and environmental carcinogenesis. His avocation is History of Toxicology. Dr. Gallo served on several NIH committees including the ALTOX-4 Study Section, Chair of the Board of Scientific Councilors of the National Toxicology Program, and member of the NIEHS Board of Councilors. He also served as Chair of the NCI Centers Review committee, as well as a member of several NAS/NRC Expert committees including Drinking Water and Health; Pesticides in the Diets of Infants and Children; Risk Assessment Methodology; and the National Research Council/Institute of Medicine Roundtable on Environmental Health Sciences, Research and Medicine. He served the US-EPA as a member of the Scientific Advisory Board, and the Dioxin Review Science Advisory Board. Dr. Gallo was Chair of the New Jersey Governor’s Pesticide Control Council, and the New Jersey Cancer Risk Commission. Dr. Gallo serves as a consultant to the academic, government and private sectors.

Research Areas

Dioxins; Experimental Models; Pharmacology and Toxicology; Ocular Toxicity; Cytoplasmic Receptors; Hormones; Mechanisms of Carcinogenesis; Cell Surface Receptors; and Chemical Carcinogenesis

Scholarly Activities

  • 2011: Society of Toxicology Education Award
  • 2001: Chair, Hormonal Carcinogenesis Gordon Research Conference
  • 2000: Ambassador of Toxicology, Mid-Atlantic Society of Toxicology
  • 1985: Chair, Mechanisms of Toxicity Gordon Research Conference
  • 1985: UMDNJ Exceptional Merit Award
  • 1979: Russell Sage College Outstanding Alumni
  • 1971-1972: NIH Post Doctoral Fellow
  • 1968-1971 NIH Pre-Doctoral Fellow

Recent Publications

  1. Pascale, R, Gallo, M, Toschi, A, Viale, P, Curti, S, Giannella, M. Validation and prognostic utility of a definition of uncomplicated Gram-negative bloodstream infection. Clin Microbiol Infect. 2024; :. doi: 10.1016/j.cmi.2024.06.007. PubMed PMID:38897350
  2. Ingangi, V, De Chiara, A, Ferrara, G, Gallo, M, Catapano, A, Fazioli, F, Di Carluccio, G, Peranzoni, E, Marigo, I, Carriero, MV et al.. Emerging Treatments Targeting the Tumor Microenvironment for Advanced Chondrosarcoma. Cells. 2024;13 (11):. doi: 10.3390/cells13110977. PubMed PMID:38891109 PubMed Central PMC11171855
  3. Bussoletti, M, Gallo, M, Bottacchiari, M, Abbondanza, D, Casciola, CM. Mesoscopic elasticity controls dynamin-driven fission of lipid tubules. Sci Rep. 2024;14 (1):14003. doi: 10.1038/s41598-024-64685-2. PubMed PMID:38890460 PubMed Central PMC11189461
  4. Eleftheriou, G, Zandonella Callegher, R, Butera, R, De Santis, M, Cavaliere, AF, Vecchio, S, Lanzi, C, Davanzo, R, Mangili, G, Bondi, E et al.. Consensus Panel Recommendations for the Pharmacological Management of Breastfeeding Women with Postpartum Depression. Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2024;21 (5):. doi: 10.3390/ijerph21050551. PubMed PMID:38791766 PubMed Central PMC11121006
  5. Antonelli, R, Ferrari, E, Gallo, M, Ciociola, T, Calciolari, E, Spisni, A, Meleti, M, Pertinhez, TA. The Association between Salivary Metabolites and Gingival Bleeding Score in Healthy Subjects: A Pilot Study. Int J Mol Sci. 2024;25 (10):. doi: 10.3390/ijms25105448. PubMed PMID:38791486 PubMed Central PMC11122368
  6. Antonelli, R, Massei, V, Ferrari, E, Gallo, M, Pertinhez, TA, Vescovi, P, Pizzi, S, Meleti, M. Salivary Diagnosis of Dental Caries: A Systematic Review. Curr Issues Mol Biol. 2024;46 (5):4234-4250. doi: 10.3390/cimb46050258. PubMed PMID:38785526 PubMed Central PMC11120503
  7. Colucci Cante, R, Nigro, F, Passannanti, F, Lentini, G, Gallo, M, Nigro, R, Budelli, AL. Gut health benefits and associated systemic effects provided by functional components from the fermentation of natural matrices. Compr Rev Food Sci Food Saf. 2024;23 (3):e13356. doi: 10.1111/1541-4337.13356. PubMed PMID:38767859
  8. Nicol, T, Declerck, C, Le Gallo, M, Bougeard, C, Habib, A, Catraye, P, Adeye, A, Boccarossa, A, Dubée, V, Marsollier, L et al.. Wound colonization with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and hypotheses about acquisition routes in rural health care settings in Sub-Saharan Africa: Perspective from a center devoted to the treatment of cutaneous neglected tropical diseases. Am J Infect Control. 2024; :. doi: 10.1016/j.ajic.2024.05.007. PubMed PMID:38763430
  9. Garreta, E, Moya-Rull, D, Marco, A, Amato, G, Ullate-Agote, A, Tarantino, C, Gallo, M, Esporrín-Ubieto, D, Centeno, A, Vilas-Zornoza, A et al.. Natural Hydrogels Support Kidney Organoid Generation and Promote In Vitro Angiogenesis. Adv Mater. 2024; :e2400306. doi: 10.1002/adma.202400306. PubMed PMID:38762768
  10. Aristizabal, S, Gallo, M, Moncada-Mejia, D, Pinzón, B. Enhancing Radiology Training Amidst Resource Limitations: Leveraging Resident Involvement: A Response to Establishing and Leading a 3D Postprocessing Radiology Lab. Can Assoc Radiol J. 2024; :8465371241253975. doi: 10.1177/08465371241253975. PubMed PMID:38755967
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Photo of Carol Gardner Ph.D.
Carol Gardner, Ph.D.
Associate Director, Flow Cytometry/Cell Sorting & Confocal Microscopy Core Rutgers University – Ernest Mario School of PharmacyEOHSI – Toxicology

Research Areas

Mechanisms of hepatotoxicity caused by lipopolysaccharide or acetaminophen, including cellular and molecular effects on isolated hepatocytes, liver macrophages and endothelial cells; characterization of subpopulations of liver macrophages and endothelial following toxicant injury; modulating the immune response to hepatotoxicants to modify liver injury by using knockout mice; and mechanisms of tissue repair following toxicant-induced injury.

Research Highlights

  • Studies on polarization of liver macrophage and endothelial cell populations in rats and mice following acetaminophen intoxication.
  • Examination of drug interactions in mice treated with acetaminophen and an anthelminthic drug.
  • Effects of loss of caveolin on acetaminophen hepatotoxicity in mice.

Recent Publications

  1. Malaviya, R, Gardner, CR, Rancourt, RC, Smith, LC, Abramova, EV, Vayas, KN, Gow, AJ, Laskin, JD, Laskin, DL. Lung injury and oxidative stress induced by inhaled chlorine in mice is associated with proinflammatory activation of macrophages and altered bioenergetics. Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 2023;461 :116388. doi: 10.1016/j.taap.2023.116388. PubMed PMID:36690086 PubMed Central PMC9960611
  2. Radbel, J, Meshanni, JA, Gardner, CR, Le-Hoang, O, Cervelli, J, Laskin, JD, Gow, AJ, Laskin, DL. Novel method to assess resident alveolar macrophage efferocytosis of apoptotic neutrophils by flow cytometry. Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 2023;460 :116359. doi: 10.1016/j.taap.2022.116359. PubMed PMID:36565939 PubMed Central PMC9870943
  3. Torres, M, Carranza, C, Sarkar, S, Gonzalez, Y, Osornio Vargas, A, Black, K, Meng, Q, Quintana-Belmares, R, Hernandez, M, Angeles Garcia, JJF et al.. Urban airborne particle exposure impairs human lung and blood Mycobacterium tuberculosis immunity. Thorax. 2019;74 (7):675-683. doi: 10.1136/thoraxjnl-2018-212529. PubMed PMID:31036772 PubMed Central PMC7162557
  4. Chmielowski, RA, Abdelhamid, DS, Faig, JJ, Petersen, LK, Gardner, CR, Uhrich, KE, Joseph, LB, Moghe, PV. Athero-inflammatory nanotherapeutics: Ferulic acid-based poly(anhydride-ester) nanoparticles attenuate foam cell formation by regulating macrophage lipogenesis and reactive oxygen species generation. Acta Biomater. 2017;57 :85-94. doi: 10.1016/j.actbio.2017.05.029. PubMed PMID:28522412 PubMed Central PMC5546209
  5. Xu, D, Wang, H, Gardner, C, Pan, Z, Zhang, PL, Zhang, J, You, G. The role of Nedd4-1 WW domains in binding and regulating human organic anion transporter 1. Am J Physiol Renal Physiol. 2016;311 (2):F320-9. doi: 10.1152/ajprenal.00153.2016. PubMed PMID:27226107 PubMed Central PMC5243221
  6. Mandal, M, Gardner, CR, Sun, R, Choi, H, Lad, S, Mishin, V, Laskin, JD, Laskin, DL. The spleen as an extramedullary source of inflammatory cells responding to acetaminophen-induced liver injury. Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 2016;304 :110-20. doi: 10.1016/j.taap.2016.04.019. PubMed PMID:27163765 PubMed Central PMC5147741
  7. Jan, YH, Heck, DE, Dragomir, AC, Gardner, CR, Laskin, DL, Laskin, JD. Acetaminophen reactive intermediates target hepatic thioredoxin reductase. Chem Res Toxicol. 2014;27 (5):882-94. doi: 10.1021/tx5000443. PubMed PMID:24661219 PubMed Central PMC4033643
  8. Massa, CB, Scott, P, Abramova, E, Gardner, C, Laskin, DL, Gow, AJ. Acute chlorine gas exposure produces transient inflammation and a progressive alteration in surfactant composition with accompanying mechanical dysfunction. Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 2014;278 (1):53-64. doi: 10.1016/j.taap.2014.02.006. PubMed PMID:24582687 PubMed Central PMC4361901
  9. Liu, Y, Gardner, CR, Laskin, JD, Laskin, DL. Classical and alternative activation of rat hepatic sinusoidal endothelial cells by inflammatory stimuli. Exp Mol Pathol. 2013;94 (1):160-7. doi: 10.1016/j.yexmp.2012.10.015. PubMed PMID:23103612 PubMed Central PMC3562401
  10. Gardner, CR, Hankey, P, Mishin, V, Francis, M, Yu, S, Laskin, JD, Laskin, DL. Regulation of alternative macrophage activation in the liver following acetaminophen intoxication by stem cell-derived tyrosine kinase. Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 2012;262 (2):139-48. doi: 10.1016/j.taap.2012.04.027. PubMed PMID:22575169 PubMed Central PMC3377817
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Photo of Panos Georgopoulos Ph.D.
Panos Georgopoulos, Ph.D.
Professor Rutgers University – School of Public HealthEOHSI – Environmental and Population Health Bio-Sciences

Dr. Georgopoulos is Professor of Environmental and Occupational Medicine at Rutgers University – Robert Wood Johnson Medical School. He is also a member of the Graduate Faculties of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, Biomedical Engineering, and of Environmental Sciences at Rutgers University, and a member of the Rutgers Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute (EOHSI). Dr. Georgopoulos received his M.S. and Ph.D. Degrees in Chemical Engineering from the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) and his Dipl. Ing. Degree from the National Technical University of Athens. At EOHSI he established and directs the Computational Chemodynamics Laboratory (CCL), a state-of-the-art facility for informatics and modeling of complex environmental and biological systems. Furthermore, he directs the State-funded Ozone Research Center and co-directs the Center for Exposure and Risk Modeling (CERM) at EOHSI. He is Co-Director of the Environmental Bioinformatics and Computational Toxicology Center (ebCTC), a research consortium of Rutgers University, Princeton University, and USFDA’s Center for Toxicoinformatics (funded by USEPA 2005-2010). He is also Director of the Informatics and Computational Toxicology Core for the NIEHS Center for Environmental Exposures and Disease (CEED) at EOHSI. He served as Director of the USDOE-funded Center of Expertise in Exposure Assessment of the Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation (CRESP). [read more…]

Research Interests

Multiscale Simulation of Environmental and Biological Systems and Interactions

  • Mathematical modeling of multimedia transport, fate and uptake of environmental pollutants – photochemical oxidants; air toxics; pesticides; solvents; heavy metals; nanomaterials; spores and pollens
  • Physiologically-based pharmacokinetics; inhalation, ingestion and dermal absorption dosimetry
  • Mechanistic pharmacodynamics
  • Virtual tissues
  • Computational systems toxicology and toxicogenomics

Enviroinformatics and the Exposome

  • Spatiotemporal data mining and analytics
  • Geographic Information and Database Management Systems
  • Multiroute/multipathway modeling of human exposures to chemical, radiological and biological agents
  • Climatic change impacts on environmental quality and human exposure and health
  • Environmental cheminformatics and bioinformatics

Risk Analysis for Environmental and Occupational Health

  • Uncertainty characterization and analysis
  • Diagnostic and prognostic risk assessment for exposures to carcinogens, neurotoxicants, allergens, irritants, endocrine disruptors
  • Individual and population based simulation modeling

Recent Publications

  1. Ren, X, Mi, Z, Georgopoulos, PG. Socioexposomics of COVID-19 across New Jersey: a comparison of geostatistical and machine learning approaches. J Expo Sci Environ Epidemiol. 2024;34 (2):197-207. doi: 10.1038/s41370-023-00518-0. PubMed PMID:36725924 PubMed Central PMC9889956
  2. Ren, X, Cai, T, Mi, Z, Bielory, L, Nolte, CG, Georgopoulos, PG. Modeling past and future spatiotemporal distributions of airborne allergenic pollen across the contiguous United States. Front Allergy. 2022;3 :959594. doi: 10.3389/falgy.2022.959594. PubMed PMID:36389037 PubMed Central PMC9640548
  3. Barrett, ES, Andrews, TR, Roy, J, Greenberg, P, Ferrante, JM, Horton, DB, Gordon, M, Rivera-Núñez, Z, Pellerano, MB, Tallia, AF et al.. Community- Versus Health Care Organization-Based Approaches to Expanding At-Home COVID-19 Testing in Black and Latino Communities, New Jersey, 2021. Am J Public Health. 2022;112 (S9):S918-S922. doi: 10.2105/AJPH.2022.306989. PubMed PMID:36265092 PubMed Central PMC9707722
  4. Ren, X, Mi, Z, Cai, T, Nolte, CG, Georgopoulos, PG. Flexible Bayesian Ensemble Machine Learning Framework for Predicting Local Ozone Concentrations. Environ Sci Technol. 2022;56 (7):3871-3883. doi: 10.1021/acs.est.1c04076. PubMed PMID:35312316 PubMed Central PMC9133919
  5. Ren, X, Weisel, CP, Georgopoulos, PG. Modeling Effects of Spatial Heterogeneities and Layered Exposure Interventions on the Spread of COVID-19 across New Jersey. Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2021;18 (22):. doi: 10.3390/ijerph182211950. PubMed PMID:34831706 PubMed Central PMC8618648
  6. Yu, CH, Weisel, CP, Alimokhtari, S, Georgopoulos, PG, Fan, ZT. Biomonitoring: A tool to assess PFNA body burdens and evaluate the effectiveness of drinking water intervention for communities in New Jersey. Int J Hyg Environ Health. 2021;235 :113757. doi: 10.1016/j.ijheh.2021.113757. PubMed PMID:33962122
  7. Zhang, X, Just, AC, Hsu, HL, Kloog, I, Woody, M, Mi, Z, Rush, J, Georgopoulos, P, Wright, RO, Stroustrup, A et al.. A hybrid approach to predict daily NO2 concentrations at city block scale. Sci Total Environ. 2021;761 :143279. doi: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2020.143279. PubMed PMID:33162146
  8. Ren, X, Mi, Z, Georgopoulos, PG. Comparison of Machine Learning and Land Use Regression for fine scale spatiotemporal estimation of ambient air pollution: Modeling ozone concentrations across the contiguous United States. Environ Int. 2020;142 :105827. doi: 10.1016/j.envint.2020.105827. PubMed PMID:32593834
  9. Cai, T, Zhang, Y, Ren, X, Bielory, L, Mi, Z, Nolte, CG, Gao, Y, Leung, LR, Georgopoulos, PG. Development of a semi-mechanistic allergenic pollen emission model. Sci Total Environ. 2019;653 :947-957. doi: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.10.243. PubMed PMID:30759620 PubMed Central PMC7841766
  10. Graber, JM, Alexander, C, Laumbach, RJ, Black, K, Strickland, PO, Georgopoulos, PG, Marshall, EG, Shendell, DG, Alderson, D, Mi, Z et al.. Per and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) blood levels after contamination of a community water supply and comparison with 2013-2014 NHANES. J Expo Sci Environ Epidemiol. 2019;29 (2):172-182. doi: 10.1038/s41370-018-0096-z. PubMed PMID:30482936 PubMed Central PMC6380951
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Photo of Michael Gochfeld M.D., Ph.D.
Michael Gochfeld, M.D., Ph.D.
Professor Emeritus Rutgers UniversityEOHSI – Clinical Research and Occupational Medicine

Research Areas

My main area of research has focused on heavy metals exposure and effect. The current emphasis is on the relationship between mercury and selenium exposure and balancing the risks against benefits of fish consumption. Much of this work involves Native American and Alaskan Native communities.

A second area focuses on the environmental consequences of energy options, examining nuclear options in the light of the spent nuclear fuel impasse and the Fukushima disaster vs unintended consequences of renewable energy. This has been developed as an outgrowth of our CRESP work on hazardous waste, risk management, and land use decisions with the U.S. Department of Energy.

A third area focuses on incorporating workplace health and safety equity into the EPA’s “Environmental Justice” paradigm.

Research Highlights

  • Participation in an EPA Environmental Justice Symposium resulted in exploration of the importance of outliers in risk management and the importance of occupational exposures as part of a comprehensive Environmental Justice paradigm.
  • The role of selenium in protecting against mercury toxicity has been known for 40 years, but the mechanism(s) of the interaction remain unclear. This study examines whether the Se:Hg molar ratio predicts mercury toxicity from fish consumption.

Scholarly Activities

  • Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine: Chair of Curriculum Committee
  • Robert Wood Johnson Medical School: M1 Block Directors Committee
  • Special Committee on Health, Productivity, and Disability Management, American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
  • Chair Committee on History of OSHA Permissible Exposure Limits

Recent Publications

  1. Burger, J, Jeitner, C, Zappalorti, RT, Bunnell, JF, Ng, K, DeVito, E, Schneider, D, Gochfeld, M. Snake Fungal Disease in Free-Ranging Northern Pine Snakes (Pituophis melanoleucus melanoleucus) in New Jersey: Lesions, Severity of Sores and Investigator's Perceptions. J Fungi (Basel). 2024;10 (2):. doi: 10.3390/jof10020125. PubMed PMID:38392797 PubMed Central PMC10889963
  2. Burger, J, Gochfeld, M, Brown, KG, Ng, K, Cortes, M, Kosson, D. The importance of recognizing Buffer Zones to lands being developed, restored, or remediated: on planning for protection of ecological resources. J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2024;87 (4):133-149. doi: 10.1080/15287394.2023.2285511. PubMed PMID:37997947 PubMed Central PMC10843829
  3. Burger, J, Feigin, S, Ng, K, Jeitner, C, Tsipoura, N, Niles, L, Gochfeld, M. Some metals and metalloids in the blood of three species of shorebirds increase while foraging during two-week migratory stopover in Delaware Bay, New Jersey. Environ Res. 2023;238 (Pt 2):117194. doi: 10.1016/j.envres.2023.117194. PubMed PMID:37748669 PubMed Central PMC10841762
  4. Burger, J, Gochfeld, M, Giffen, N, Brown, KG, Cortes, M, Ng, K, Kosson, DS. Comparing land cover and interior forests on contaminated land and the surrounding region: Oak Ridge Reservation as a case study. J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2023;86 (15):501-517. doi: 10.1080/15287394.2023.2223231. PubMed PMID:37335075
  5. Burger, J, Gochfeld, M, Zappalorti, R, Bunnell, J, Jeitner, C, Schneider, D, Ng, K, DeVito, E, Lorch, JM. Prevalence of Ophidiomyces ophidiicola and epizootiology of snake fungal disease in free-ranging Northern Pine Snakes (Pituophis melanoleucus melanoleucus) in New Jersey. Environ Monit Assess. 2023;195 (6):662. doi: 10.1007/s10661-023-11259-w. PubMed PMID:37169998
  6. Soskolne, CL, Kramer, S, Ramos-Bonilla, JP, Mandrioli, D, Sass, J, Gochfeld, M, Cranor, CF, Advani, S, Bero, LA. Correction: Toolkit for detecting misused epidemiological methods. Environ Health. 2022;21 (1):109. doi: 10.1186/s12940-022-00938-9. PubMed PMID:36368967 PubMed Central PMC9652904
  7. Soskolne, CL, Bero, LA, Kramer, S, Gochfeld, M, Ramos-Bonilla, JP, Sass, J, Cranor, CF, Advani, S, Mandrioli, D. Response to Toshihide Tsuda, Yumiko Miyano and Eiji Yamamoto [1]. Environ Health. 2022;21 (1):100. doi: 10.1186/s12940-022-00913-4. PubMed PMID:36284322 PubMed Central PMC9597996
  8. Gochfeld, M. Information needs, approaches, and case studies in human health risk communication. Risk Anal. 2022;42 (11):2376-2399. doi: 10.1111/risa.14006. PubMed PMID:36100396 PubMed Central PMC10087356
  9. Mendoza, FA, Bagley, J, Gochfeld, M, Dalakas, MC, Farber, JL, Jimenez, SA. Progressive multifocal fibrosing neuropathy: description of a novel disease. Acta Neuropathol Commun. 2022;10 (1):34. doi: 10.1186/s40478-022-01341-8. PubMed PMID:35296359 PubMed Central PMC8925190
  10. Burger, J, Gochfeld, M, Kosson, DS, Brown, KG, Salisbury, J, Greenberg, M, Jeitner, C. Combining ecological, eco-cultural, and environmental justice parameters to create Eco-EJ indicators to monitor cultural and environmental justices for diverse communities around contaminated sites. Environ Monit Assess. 2022;194 (3):177. doi: 10.1007/s10661-021-09535-8. PubMed PMID:35150318 PubMed Central PMC9488455
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Photo of Lawrence I Golbe M.D.
Lawrence I Golbe, M.D.
Professor Emeritus Rutgers UniversityNeurology- Clinical Academic Building

 

HOSPITAL AFFILIATIONS:
Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital – New Brunswick – New Brunswick, NJ
SPECIALTY:
Neurology – American Board of Psychiatry & Neurology
RESIDENCY:
Neurology, New York University – Bellevue Hospital, New York City, NY, US
Medicine, Hahnemann Hospital, Philadelphia, PA, US
INTERESTS:
Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), parkinsons disease, movement disorders
DEGREE:
New York University, New York, NY, US
Brown University, Providence, RI, US
Photo of Marion Gordon Ph.D.
Marion Gordon, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Pharmacology and Toxicology Rutgers University – Ernest Mario School of PharmacyEOHSI – Toxicology

Dr. Gordon received her BS in Chemistry (1973) and PhD. in the Rutgers-UMDNJ joint graduate program in Biochemistry in 1986. Dr. Gordon’s last year of graduate school was completed at Harvard Medical School in the Anatomy and Cell Biology Department, where she stayed to do post doctoral training. After a second post doctoral fellowship in the Anatomy and Cell Biology Department at Tufts Medical School she joined the faculty as an Assistant Professor, and remained there for 7 years. She came to the Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy in 1998, and is presently an Associate Professor in the Pharmacology and Toxicology Department.

Dr. Gordon has been continuously funded by NIH since 1988. She teaches the PharmD students in their P1 and P2 years in the Pathophysiology and in Pharmacology I and II courses. She has served on the thesis committees of 31 graduate students, and in her laboratory she has trained 2 MD research residents, 8 medical and graduate students (2 from Tufts Medical School), 13 pharmacy students (including 2 honors research students), as well as 1 MIT and 9 Rutgers undergraduate students. She has been thesis advisor to 1 M.S. student and 3 Ph.D. students in the Joint Program in Toxicology.

Dr. Gordon has served on the editorial boards for Developmental Dynamics, Anatomical Record, and on the editorial board of Matrix Biology. She currently serves on the Anterior Eye Disease Study Section of the NIH. She has been very active in the American Association of Anatomists, serving this national society as an executive officer for 5 years.

Research Areas

Dr. Gordon’s research examines corneal development and functional integrity as it relates to extracellular matrix. Projects involve the contribution of diverse collagens to corneal transparency, how they facilitate the attachment of epithelial and stromal cell layers, and what role the molecules play in wound healing. Dr. Gordon is also interested in collagen pathologies, especially fibrosis, in other organs. These investigations examine how Fibril-Associated Collagens with Interrupted Triple helices (FACITs) play a role in normal and pathological assembly of fibrils in the lung, liver, umbilical arteries and fetal membranes. The laboratory has also studied the roles of 3 transmembranous molecules, EMMPRIN, collagen XVII, and collagen XXIII, in development, wound healing, and cancer.

Research Highlights

Collagens, wound healing, fibrosis, corneal development, collagen pathologies, sulfur mustard injury, chemical counterterrorism

Scholarly Activities

  • 1988-1991: Individual National Research Service Award: “Avian Cornea Developmental Regulation of Collagens”
  • 1995: Invited to the laboratory of Dr. Ulla Wewer as an “Expert Guest Researcher” for collaborative research at the institute of Pathological Anatomy, University of Copenhagen, Denmark
  • 2000: Young Faculty Participation Award from the American Association of Anatomists
  • 2000- : Faculty for the National Eye Institute sponsored course “Fundamental Issues in Vision Research,” at the Marine Biological Laboratories, Woodshole, MA (Topic: “Corneal Extracellular Matrix”). The National Eye Institute has direct input into course topics, sponsors the course, financially supports the students, and has a representative present during the entire course.
  • 2000-2007: Co-director of the Signal Transduction Core of the NIEHS Center for Excellence at the Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute
  • 2002: Program organizer for the “Matrix and Morphogenesis” conference, Boston, MA
  • 2004: appointed to the Editorial Board of Developmental Dynamics
  • 2004: appointed to the Board of Reviewers for Anatomical Record
  • 2004-2005: Member of the Federation of Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB) Excellence in Science Award committee
  • 2004-2008: Elected to an executive position in a national society: Co-chair of the Program Committee of the American Association of Anatomists, a core member society of FASEB (the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology)
  • 2007-2009: Invited by the Douglass Residence Campus Dean Carmen Twillie Ambar to be on the Faculty Advisory Committee for the Douglass Project for Rutgers Women in Math, Science and Engineering
  • 2007- : Member of Advisory Cabinet for the “Fundamentals Issues in Vision Research” course, taught at the MBL in Woods Hole, MA
  • 2007- Faculty advisor for Pharmacy Profession Fraternity, Alpha Zeta Omega
  • 2008: Moderator for the American Association of Anatomists annual meeting Keynote Address by Harold f. Dvorak, MD, entitled “Angiogenesis: the Importance of Anatomy,” Experimental Biology 2008 meeting, San Diego, CA
  • 2008: Symposium chair for “Deciphering the Actions of Angiogenesis Inhibitors: Surprises and New Directions,” American Association of Anatomists, Experimental Biology 2008 meeting, San Diego, CA
  • 2008:  Moderator for the 36th Annual Scientific Session of the New Jersey Thoracic Society meeting
  • 2008: Special Guest Editor for Developmental Dynamics volume 237, issue 10, special issue entitled: Special Focus on the Extracellular Matrix, in Memory of Dr. Elizabeth D. Hay
  • 2008- : Co-director of the Diseases of the Integument Core, a unit of the NIEHS Center for Environmental Exposures and Disease
  • 2009: Moderator for the symposium entitled “Corneal Wound Healing and Cell Biology” at the annual Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO) meeting
  • 2009-2013: NIH Center for Scientific Review regular standing study section member–Anterior Eye Disease

Recent Publications

  1. Joseph, LB, Gordon, MK, Zhou, P, Hahn, RA, Lababidi, H, Croutch, CR, Sinko, PJ, Heck, DE, Laskin, DL, Laskin, JD et al.. Sulfur mustard corneal injury is associated with alterations in the epithelial basement membrane and stromal extracellular matrix. Exp Mol Pathol. 2022;128 :104807. doi: 10.1016/j.yexmp.2022.104807. PubMed PMID:35798063 PubMed Central PMC10044521
  2. Joseph, LB, Gordon, MK, Kang, J, Croutch, CR, Zhou, P, Heck, DE, Laskin, DL, Laskin, JD. Characterization of the rabbit conjunctiva: Effects of sulfur mustard. Exp Mol Pathol. 2021;121 :104656. doi: 10.1016/j.yexmp.2021.104656. PubMed PMID:34081961 PubMed Central PMC9006340
  3. DeSantis-Rodrigues, A, Hahn, RA, Zhou, P, Babin, M, Svoboda, KKH, Chang, YC, Gerecke, DR, Gordon, MK. SM1997 downregulates mustard-induced enzymes that disrupt corneal epithelial attachment. Anat Rec (Hoboken). 2021;304 (9):1974-1983. doi: 10.1002/ar.24597. PubMed PMID:33554453
  4. Chang, YC, Hahn, RA, Gordon, MK, Laskin, JD, Gerecke, DR. A type IV collagenase inhibitor, N-hydroxy-3-phenyl-2-(4-phenylbenzenesulfonamido) propanamide (BiPS), suppresses skin injury induced by sulfur mustard. Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 2020;401 :115078. doi: 10.1016/j.taap.2020.115078. PubMed PMID:32479919 PubMed Central PMC7470515
  5. Chang, YC, Wang, JD, Chang, HY, Zhou, P, Hahn, RA, Gordon, MK, Laskin, JD, Gerecke, DR. Expression of Laminin γ2 Proteolytic Fragments in Murine Skin Following Exposure to Sulfur Mustard. Anat Rec (Hoboken). 2020;303 (6):1642-1652. doi: 10.1002/ar.24405. PubMed PMID:32421930 PubMed Central PMC7394410
  6. Svoboda, KKH, Gordon, MK. Extracellular matrix: The proteins that function throughout the body. Anat Rec (Hoboken). 2020;303 (6):1509-1513. doi: 10.1002/ar.24404. PubMed PMID:32421924
  7. Eveleth, DD, Eveleth, JJ, Subramaniam, A, Hahn, R, Zhou, P, Gordon, MK, Bradshaw, RA. An Engineered Human Fibroblast Growth Factor-1 Derivative, TTHX1114, Ameliorates Short-term Corneal Nitrogen Mustard Injury in Rabbit Organ Cultures. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2018;59 (11):4720-4730. doi: 10.1167/iovs.18-24568. PubMed PMID:30267094 PubMed Central PMC6155473
  8. Chang, YC, Gordon, MK, Gerecke, DR. Expression of Laminin 332 in Vesicant Skin Injury and Wound Repair. Clin Dermatol (Wilmington). 2018;2 (1):. . PubMed PMID:30058002 PubMed Central PMC6063082
  9. Chang, YC, Soriano, M, Hahn, RA, Casillas, RP, Gordon, MK, Laskin, JD, Gerecke, DR. Expression of cytokines and chemokines in mouse skin treated with sulfur mustard. Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 2018;355 :52-59. doi: 10.1016/j.taap.2018.06.008. PubMed PMID:29935281 PubMed Central PMC6438172
  10. Gordon, MK, DeSantis-Rodrigues, A, Hahn, R, Zhou, P, Chang, Y, Svoboda, KK, Gerecke, DR. The molecules in the corneal basement membrane zone affected by mustard exposure suggest potential therapies. Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2016;1378 (1):158-165. doi: 10.1111/nyas.13226. PubMed PMID:27737494 PubMed Central PMC5221489
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Photo of Andrew Gow Ph.D.
Andrew Gow, Ph.D.
Professor Rutgers University – Ernest Mario School of PharmacyEOHSI – Toxicology

Education

  • BSc,  (Hons)  University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Scotland, UK
  • MEd,  Temple University, Philadelphia, PA
  • PhD, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA
  • Post-Doc, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA

Research Areas

Mechanisms of nitric oxide signaling in a wide variety of pathophysiological conditions; molecular mechanisms involved in controlling nitric oxide signaling and the role of nitric oxide in cardiopulmonary diseases such as emphysema, acute lung injury, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, sickle cell disease and diabetes; Nitric oxide in inflammatory cells such as macrophages and microglia.

Research

Our laboratory investigates mechanisms of Nitric Oxide signaling in a wide variety of pathophysiological conditions.  We seek to understand the molecular mechanisms involved in controlling Nitric Oxide signaling and answer the question as to how nature uses such a simple molecule to control a multitude of biological processes and in almost every organism.  In particular, we investigate the role of Nitric Oxide in cardiopulmonary diseases such as emphysema, acute lung injury, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, sickle cell disease and diabetes.  We are particularly interested in the function of Nitric Oxide in inflammatory cells such as macrophages and microglia.  It is thought that by better understanding the mechanisms involved in Nitric Oxide signaling that we can design appropriate pharmacological interventions for human diseases in which Nitric Oxide metabolism is disrupted.

Research Highlights

  • S-nitrosylation of pulmonary collectins
  • Role of nitric oxide in lung disease
  • Mechanisms regulating nitric oxide biosynthesis

Scholarly Activities

  • 2001, Florence R.C. Murray Fellowship
  • 2000, Translational Medicine Award, Duke University
  • 1998, Chartered Chemist, Royal Society of Chemistry
  • 1997, Young Investigator Award, International Nitric Oxide Society
  • 1996, Young Investigator Award, Oxygen Society
  • 1995-97, National Research Service Award, National Institutes of Health-NHLBI in Lung Cell and Molecular Biology
  • 1993-95, Russell Conwell Research Fellowship

Recent Publications

  1. Smith, LC, Abramova, H, Vayas, K, Rodriguez, J, Gelfand-Titiyevksiy, B, Roepke, T, Laskin, JD, Gow, AJ, Laskin, DL. Transcriptional profiling of lung macrophages following ozone exposure in mice identifies signaling pathways regulating immunometabolic activation. Toxicol Sci. 2024; :. doi: 10.1093/toxsci/kfae081. PubMed PMID:38897669
  2. Radbel, J, Meshanni, JA, Vayas, KN, Le-Hoang, O, Abramova, E, Zhou, P, Joseph, LB, Laskin, JD, Gow, AJ, Laskin, DL et al.. Effects of ozone exposure on lung injury, inflammation, and oxidative stress in a murine model of non-pneumonic endotoxemia. Toxicol Sci. 2024; :. doi: 10.1093/toxsci/kfae062. PubMed PMID:38749002
  3. Bellomo, A, Herbert, J, Kudlak, MJ, Laskin, JD, Gow, AJ, Laskin, DL. Identification of early events in nitrogen mustard pulmonary toxicity that are independent of infiltrating inflammatory cells using precision cut lung slices. Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 2024;486 :116941. doi: 10.1016/j.taap.2024.116941. PubMed PMID:38677601
  4. Malaviya, R, Meshanni, JA, Sunil, VR, Venosa, A, Guo, C, Abramova, EV, Vayas, KN, Jiang, C, Cervelli, JA, Gow, AJ et al.. Role of macrophage bioenergetics in N-acetylcysteine-mediated mitigation of lung injury and oxidative stress induced by nitrogen mustard. Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 2024;485 :116908. doi: 10.1016/j.taap.2024.116908. PubMed PMID:38513841
  5. Malin, SK, Remchak, ME, Heiston, EM, Battillo, DJ, Gow, AJ, Shah, AM, Liu, Z. Intermediate versus morning chronotype has lower vascular insulin sensitivity in adults with obesity. Diabetes Obes Metab. 2024;26 (5):1582-1592. doi: 10.1111/dom.15456. PubMed PMID:38246697 PubMed Central PMC11001524
  6. Gutierrez, B, Aggarwal, T, Erguven, H, Stone, MRL, Guo, C, Bellomo, A, Abramova, E, Stevenson, ER, Laskin, DL, Gow, AJ et al.. Direct assessment of nitrative stress in lipid environments: Applications of a designer lipid-based biosensor for peroxynitrite. iScience. 2023;26 (12):108567. doi: 10.1016/j.isci.2023.108567. PubMed PMID:38144454 PubMed Central PMC10746523
  7. Remchak, ME, Dosik, JK, Pappas, G, Gow, AJ, Shah, AM, Malin, SK. Exercise blood pressure and heart rate responses to graded exercise testing in intermediate versus morning chronotypes with obesity. Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol. 2023;325 (4):H635-H644. doi: 10.1152/ajpheart.00149.2023. PubMed PMID:37505468 PubMed Central PMC10642995
  8. Smith, LC, Gow, AJ, Abramova, E, Vayas, K, Guo, C, Noto, J, Lyman, J, Rodriquez, J, Gelfand-Titiyevskiy, B, Malcolm, C et al.. Role of PPARγ in dyslipidemia and altered pulmonary functioning in mice following ozone exposure. Toxicol Sci. 2023;194 (1):109-119. doi: 10.1093/toxsci/kfad048. PubMed PMID:37202362 PubMed Central PMC10306402
  9. Meshanni, JA, Lee, JM, Vayas, KN, Sun, R, Jiang, C, Guo, GL, Gow, AJ, Laskin, JD, Laskin, DL. Suppression of Lung Oxidative Stress, Inflammation, and Fibrosis following Nitrogen Mustard Exposure by the Selective Farnesoid X Receptor Agonist Obeticholic Acid. J Pharmacol Exp Ther. 2024;388 (2):586-595. doi: 10.1124/jpet.123.001557. PubMed PMID:37188530 PubMed Central PMC10801770
  10. Herbert, J, Kelty, JS, Laskin, JD, Laskin, DL, Gow, AJ. Menthol flavoring in e-cigarette condensate causes pulmonary dysfunction and cytotoxicity in precision cut lung slices. Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol. 2023;324 (3):L345-L357. doi: 10.1152/ajplung.00222.2022. PubMed PMID:36692165 PubMed Central PMC10026991
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Photo of Judith Graber Ph.D.
Judith Graber, Ph.D.
Associate Professor Rutgers University – School of Public HealthEOHSI – Environmental and Population Health Bio-Sciences

Research Areas

  • Cancer risk and risk factors among volunteer and career firefighters.
  • Adverse effects of occupational dust exposure and interactions with modifiable personal risk factors, including tobacco and alcohol use and obesity.
  • Per- and poly-fluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) exposure and health outcomes in occupational and community settings

 Research Highlights

  • Principal New Jersey Firefighters Cancer Prevention Project, looking at cancer risk among New Jersey volunteer and career firefighters. The long-term goal of this work is to reduce cancer incidence and mortality among firefighters.
  • Investigating the evaluate associations between health outcomes and multiple estimates of exposure to poly- and perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), with an emphasis on perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), among members of highly exposed communities conditions, including work pace bullying and harassment,  and contribute to workplace and other injuries
  • Evaluating the contribution of World Trade Center related exposure to exposure to head neck cancer, given the etiologic role of tobacco use, heavy alcohol use and oral infection with the human papilloma virus in the incidence of cancer of the head and neck

Recent Publications

  1. Graber, JM, Alexander, C, Laumbach, RJ, Black, K, Strickland, PO, Georgopoulos, PG, Marshall, EG, Shendell, DG, Alderson, D, Mi, Z et al.. Per and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) blood levels after contamination of a community water supply and comparison with 2013-2014 NHANES. J Expo Sci Environ Epidemiol. 2019;29 (2):172-182. doi: 10.1038/s41370-018-0096-z. PubMed PMID:30482936 PubMed Central PMC6380951
  2. Bover Manderski, MT, Black, K, Udasin, IG, Giuliano, AR, Steinberg, MB, Ohman Strickland, P, Black, TM, Dasaro, CR, Crane, M, Harrison, D et al.. Risk factors for head and neck cancer in the World Trade Center Health Program General Responder Cohort: results from a nested case-control study. Occup Environ Med. 2019;76 (11):854-860. doi: 10.1136/oemed-2019-105890. PubMed PMID:31515248
  3. Casseus M, West B, Graber JM, Wackowski O, Cooney JM, JD; Lee HS. Disparities in disability status and illicit drug use among a nationally representative sample of U.S. College students. Disability and Health Journal [in press]Brackbill, RM, Graber, JM, Robison, WAA. Editorial for “Long-Term Health Effects of the 9/11 Disaster” in International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 2019. Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2019;16 (18):. doi: 10.3390/ijerph16183289. PubMed PMID:31500226 PubMed Central PMC6765956
  4. Uhiara, D, Shendell, DG, Borjan, M, Graber, JM, Koshy, K, Lumia, M. Reported injury, hospitalization, and injury fatality rates among New Jersey adolescent workers. Inj Epidemiol. 2019;6 :37. doi: 10.1186/s40621-019-0216-9. PubMed PMID:31453047 PubMed Central PMC6699110
  5. Graber, JM, Harris, G, Black, K, Lucchini, RG, Giuliano, AR, Dasaro, CR, Shapiro, M, Steinberg, MB, Crane, MA, Moline, JM et al.. Excess HPV-related head and neck cancer in the world trade center health program general responder cohort. Int. J. Cancer. 2019;145 (6):1504-1509. doi: 10.1002/ijc.32070. PubMed PMID:30556136
  6. Wang, C, Bischoff, E, Eiden, AL, Zha, C, Cooper, R, Graber, JM. Residents Attitudes and Home Sanitation Predict Presence of German Cockroaches (Blattodea: Ectobiidae) in Apartments for Low-Income Senior Residents. J. Econ. Entomol. 2019;112 (1):284-289. doi: 10.1093/jee/toy307. PubMed PMID:30321349
  7. Graber, JM. Application of the Delphi method to reduce disability and mortality from coal mine dust lung disease in China; a new approach to an old problem. Occup Environ Med. 2018;75 (9):615-616. doi: 10.1136/oemed-2018-105075. PubMed PMID:29991498
  8. Graber, JM, Chuang, CT, Ward, CL, Black, K, Udasin, IG. Head and Neck Cancer in World Trade Center Responders: A Case Series. J. Occup. Environ. Med. 2018;60 (9):e439-e444. doi: 10.1097/JOM.0000000000001386. PubMed PMID:29933317 PubMed Central PMC6131053
  9. Shendell, DG, Graber, JM, Milich, LJ, Pratt, ME. Assessing Acute Symptoms Related to Occupational Exposures Among Nail Salon Technicians. J. Occup. Environ. Med. 2018;60 (4):343-349. doi: 10.1097/JOM.0000000000001210. PubMed PMID:29099468
  10. Farnacio, Y, Pratt, ME, Marshall, EG, Graber, JM. Are Workplace Psychosocial Factors Associated With Work-Related Injury in the US Workforce?: National Health Interview Survey, 2010. J. Occup. Environ. Med. 2017;59 (10):e164-e171. doi: 10.1097/JOM.0000000000001143. PubMed PMID:28991808

 

Photo of Michael R. Greenberg Ph.D.
Michael R. Greenberg, Ph.D.
Distinguished Professor and Associate Dean of the Faculty Rutgers University – Bloustein SchoolEOHSI – Environmental Health Policy

Michael Greenberg studies environmental health and risk analysis. He is distinguished professor and associate dean of the faculty of the Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, Rutgers University. He has written more than 30 books and more than 300 articles. His most recent books are The Environmental Impact Statement After Two Generations: Managing Environmental Power, New York: (Routledge 2011), Nuclear Waste Management, Nuclear Power and Energy Choices: Public Preferences, Perceptions, and Trust, (Springer 2012), and Protecting Seniors Against Environmental Disasters: From Hazards and Vulnerability to Prevention and Resilience (Earthscan 2014). He has been a member of National Research Council Committees that focus on the destruction of the U.S. chemical weapons stockpile and nuclear weapons; chemical waste management; and the degradation of the U.S. government physical infrastructure, and sustainability and the U.S. EPA. Currently, he is chairing a Committee for the appropriations committees of the U.S. Senate and House to determine the extent that the US DOE emphasizes human health and safety in its allocations for remediating former nuclear weapons sites. Dr. Greenberg has received awards from the United States Environmental Protection Agency, the Society for Professional Journalists, the Public Health Association, the Association of American Geographers, and Society for Risk Analysis. He served as area editor for social sciences and then editor-in-chief of Risk Analysis: An International Journal during the period 2002-2013, and continues as associate editor for environmental health for the American Journal of Public Health.

Undergraduate Courses

  • Introduction to Planning, Public Policy, and Health

Graduate Courses

  • Environmental Planning and Management
  • Graduate Planning Studio
  • Transportation Risk & Security

Recent Publications

  1. Greenberg, MR, Lowrie, K. Thomas Burke: Blending practice and academia at the highest levels. Risk Anal. 2023;43 (12):2405-2410. doi: 10.1111/risa.14225. PubMed PMID:38009438
  2. Greenberg, M, Lowrie, K. Robert Budnitz-Tinkerer, experimenter, and nuclear safety promoter. Risk Anal. 2024;44 (1):5-11. doi: 10.1111/risa.14246. PubMed PMID:38009429
  3. Greenberg, M, Lowrie, K. Kristin Shrader-Frechette: Confronting environmental injustice. Risk Anal. 2023; :. doi: 10.1111/risa.14174. PubMed PMID:37277917
  4. Greenberg, M, Schneider, D donas@rutgers.edu. Population density: What does it really mean in geographical health studies?. Health Place. 2023;81 :103001. doi: 10.1016/j.healthplace.2023.103001. PubMed PMID:36947902
  5. Greenberg, M, Lowrie, K, Heller, C, Kunreuther, L. Howard Kunreuther: An irrational economist committed to managing risk. Risk Anal. 2022;42 (12):2607-2612. doi: 10.1111/risa.14078. PubMed PMID:36717362
  6. Burger, J, Greenberg, M, Lowrie, K, Goldstein, BD. Bernard D. Goldstein-Risk communication as an essential component of public health practice. Risk Anal. 2022;42 (11):2459-2463. doi: 10.1111/risa.14055. PubMed PMID:36625059 PubMed Central PMC10316670
  7. Burger, J, Greenberg, M, Lowrie, K, Berlin, K. Ken Berlin-Climate science, risk, and solutions must be communicated together. Risk Anal. 2022;42 (11):2531-2535. doi: 10.1111/risa.14034. PubMed PMID:36625058 PubMed Central PMC10316665
  8. Burger, J, Greenberg, M, Lowrie, K, Safina, C. Carl Safina-Provide your audience with information they care about. Risk Anal. 2022;42 (11):2525-2530. doi: 10.1111/risa.14056. PubMed PMID:36625057 PubMed Central PMC10316667
  9. Burger, J, Lowrie, K, Greenberg, MR. Michael R. Greenberg-Talking to the media requires clear, concise, relatable messages. Risk Anal. 2022;42 (11):2504-2509. doi: 10.1111/risa.14057. PubMed PMID:36625056 PubMed Central PMC10324414
  10. Burger, J, Greenberg, M, Lowrie, K, Johnson, JH Jr. James H. Johnson Jr.-Listen and find commonalities. Risk Anal. 2022;42 (11):2510-2514. doi: 10.1111/risa.14036. PubMed PMID:36625055 PubMed Central PMC10347557
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Abigail (Gail) Gregorio
Accounting Specialist Rutgers UniversityEOHSI – Central Administrattion
Photo of Grace L. Guo MBBS, Ph.D.
Grace L. Guo, MBBS, Ph.D.
Professor Rutgers University – Ernest Mario School of PharmacyEOHSI – Toxicology

Dr. Guo is an Associate Professor at the Department Pharmacology and Toxicology in the Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy of Rutgers University. She is an adjunct faculty of the Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics in School of Medicine at the University of Kanas Medical Center.  Dr. Guo obtained her MBBS degree from the West China University of Medical Sciences in 1993 and a PhD degree from the University of Kansas Medical Center in 2001, as well as post-doctoral training at the NCI, NIH in 2004. From 2004-2012, Dr. Guo has served as a faculty at the University of Kansas Medical Center.

Research Areas

Liver is essential for life and liver functions are tightly regulated. Particularly, the impact of intestine on liver homeostasis, function and diseases is significant, but this impact has been less studied. Our group has been focusing on determining the effects of intestine-liver crosstalks on liver metabolism and pathogenesis and the underlying molecular mechanisms, especially following disruption of endogenous homeostasis and exposure to xenobiotic chemicals.

Scholarly Activities

  • 2012: Presidential Poster Award, AASLD meeting (2)
  • 2011: Presidential Poster Award, AASLD meeting
  • 2010: Presidential Poster Award, AASLD meeting
  • 2009: Presidential Poster Award, AASLD meeting
  • 2009: Post award winner for Annual Liver Center Symposium, University of Kansas Medical Center
  • 2007: First place in oral presentation in Annual Cancer Center Symposium, University of Kansas Medical Center
  • 2005: BIRCWH/NIH scholar

Recent Publications

  1. Chow, MD, Otersen, K, Wassef, A, Kong, B, Yamarthy, S, Rizzolo, D, Yang, I, Buckley, B, Lu, A, Crook, N et al.. Effects of intestine-specific deletion of FGF15 on the development of fatty liver disease with vertical sleeve gastrectomy. Hepatol Commun. 2024;8 (6):. doi: 10.1097/HC9.0000000000000444. PubMed PMID:38780301 PubMed Central PMC11124683
  2. Jin, J, Nguyen, LTG, Wassef, A, Sadek, R, Schmitt, TM, Guo, GL, Rasmussen, TP, Zhong, XB. Identification and Functional Characterization of Alternative Transcripts of LncRNA HNF1A-AS1 and Their Impacts on Cell Growth, Differentiation, Liver Diseases, and in Response to Drug Induction. Noncoding RNA. 2024;10 (2):. doi: 10.3390/ncrna10020028. PubMed PMID:38668386 PubMed Central PMC11053763
  3. Taylor, R, Yang, Z, Henry, Z, Capece, G, Meadows, V, Otersen, K, Basaly, V, Bhattacharya, A, Mera, S, Zhou, P et al.. Characterization of individual bile acids in vivo utilizing a novel low bile acid mouse model. Toxicol Sci. 2024;199 (2):316-331. doi: 10.1093/toxsci/kfae029. PubMed PMID:38526215
  4. Yang, X, Wang, J, Chang, CY, Zhou, F, Liu, J, Xu, H, Ibrahim, M, Gomez, M, Guo, GL, Liu, H et al.. Leukemia inhibitory factor suppresses hepatic de novo lipogenesis and induces cachexia in mice. Nat Commun. 2024;15 (1):627. doi: 10.1038/s41467-024-44924-w. PubMed PMID:38245529 PubMed Central PMC10799847
  5. Yang, Z, Zarbl, H, Guo, GL. Circadian Regulation of Endocrine Fibroblast Growth Factors on Systemic Energy Metabolism. Mol Pharmacol. 2024;105 (3):179-193. doi: 10.1124/molpharm.123.000831. PubMed PMID:38238100 PubMed Central PMC10877735
  6. Bhattacharya, A, Taylor, RE, Guo, GL. In vivo mouse models to study bile acid synthesis and signaling. Hepatobiliary Pancreat Dis Int. 2023;22 (5):466-473. doi: 10.1016/j.hbpd.2023.08.009. PubMed PMID:37620226 PubMed Central PMC10790561
  7. Meadows, V, Yang, Z, Basaly, V, Guo, GL. FXR Friend-ChIPs in the Enterohepatic System. Semin Liver Dis. 2023;43 (3):267-278. doi: 10.1055/a-2128-5538. PubMed PMID:37442156 PubMed Central PMC10620036
  8. Meshanni, JA, Lee, JM, Vayas, KN, Sun, R, Jiang, C, Guo, GL, Gow, AJ, Laskin, JD, Laskin, DL. Suppression of Lung Oxidative Stress, Inflammation, and Fibrosis following Nitrogen Mustard Exposure by the Selective Farnesoid X Receptor Agonist Obeticholic Acid. J Pharmacol Exp Ther. 2024;388 (2):586-595. doi: 10.1124/jpet.123.001557. PubMed PMID:37188530 PubMed Central PMC10801770
  9. Henry, Z, Meadows, V, Guo, GL. FXR and NASH: an avenue for tissue-specific regulation. Hepatol Commun. 2023;7 (5):. doi: 10.1097/HC9.0000000000000127. PubMed PMID:37058105 PubMed Central PMC10109454
  10. Taylor, R, Armstrong, L, Bhattacharya, A, Henry, Z, Brinker, A, Buckley, B, Kong, B, Guo, G. Myclobutanil-mediated alteration of liver-gut FXR signaling in mice. Toxicol Sci. 2023;191 (2):387-399. doi: 10.1093/toxsci/kfac129. PubMed PMID:36511616 PubMed Central PMC9936201
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Rita Hahn
Research Associate Rutgers UniversityEOHSI – Toxicology
Photo of William K. Hallman Ph.D.
William K. Hallman, Ph.D.
Professor, Department of Human Ecology Rutgers University – School of Environmental and Biological SciencesEOHSI – Clinical Research and Occupational Medicine

Dr. William K. Hallman is a Professor in the Department of Human Ecology at Rutgers University, New Jersey, USA. An experimental psychologist with expertise in consumer perceptions of risk and risk communication, his scholarship has focused on numerous issues concerning health, food, technology, and the environment. He has published more than 250 peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, abstracts, and monographs, including studies of public perceptions, communications, and behavior change strategies involving environmental contaminants, unexplained symptom syndromes, infectious and non-infectious diseases, food safety, foodborne illness outbreaks, food recalls, food insecurity, food labeling, nutrition, and preventive health behaviors. He has also conducted extensive studies of consumer perceptions and acceptance of new food technologies including genetically modified foods, nanotechnology in food and agriculture, gene editing, and cell-cultured meat, poultry, and seafood.

Dr. Hallman is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), a Fellow of the Society for Risk Analysis, and a Distinguished Research Fellow of the Annenberg Public Policy Center of the University of Pennsylvania. He is currently a member of the National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine (NASEM) Climate Crossroads Advisory Committee, a member of the US FDA’s Nonprescription Drug Advisory Committee (NDAC), and a member of the Alliance to Stop Foodborne Illness Recall Modernization Working Group. He has served as the Director of the Rutgers Food Policy Institute, as Chair of the FDA’s Risk Communication Advisory Committee, and as a U.S. Delegate to the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) Food Safety Cooperation Forum, which published the APEC Food Safety Risk Communication Framework and Associated Guidelines. He is a co-author of the Risk Communication Applied to Food Safety Handbook, published jointly by the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations and the World Health Organization (WHO). He is also a co-author of Communicating Science Effectively, A Research Agenda, published by the National Academies.

Recent Publications

  1. Ashby, E, Minicucci, C, Liao, J, Buonsenso, D, González-Dambrauskas, S, Obregón, R, Zahn, M, Hallman, W, John, C. Systems Thinking for Public Health: A Case Study Using U.S. Public Education. NAM Perspect. 2023;2023 :. doi: 10.31478/202311a. PubMed PMID:38784633 PubMed Central PMC11114595
  2. McKeon, GP, Hallman, WK. Front-of-Package Protein Labels on Cereal Create Health Halos. Foods. 2024;13 (8):. doi: 10.3390/foods13081139. PubMed PMID:38672812 PubMed Central PMC11049005
  3. Hallman, WK, Hallman, WK 2nd, Hallman, EE. Cell-based, cell-cultured, cell-cultivated, cultured, or cultivated. What is the best name for meat, poultry, and seafood made directly from the cells of animals?. NPJ Sci Food. 2023;7 (1):62. doi: 10.1038/s41538-023-00234-x. PubMed PMID:38057390 PubMed Central PMC10700563
  4. Zhang, M, Lu, J, Hallman, WK. Sharing on Facebook and Face-to-Face What Others Do or Approve: Word-of-Mouth Driven by Social Norms. Front Psychol. 2021;12 :712253. doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2021.712253. PubMed PMID:34671296 PubMed Central PMC8521032
  5. Zhang, M, Zhang, Y, Hallman, WK, Williams, JD. Eating green for health or social benefits? Interactions of attitudes with self-identity on the consumption of vegetarian meals among U.S. and Chinese college students. Appetite. 2021;167 :105652. doi: 10.1016/j.appet.2021.105652. PubMed PMID:34418504
  6. Hallman, WK, Hallman, WK 2nd. A comparison of cell-based and cell-cultured as appropriate common or usual names to label products made from the cells of fish. J Food Sci. 2021;86 (9):3798-3809. doi: 10.1111/1750-3841.15860. PubMed PMID:34337762 PubMed Central PMC8518778
  7. Briggs, T, Quick, V, Hallman, WK. Feature Availability Comparison in Free and Paid Versions of Popular Smartphone Weight Management Applications. J Nutr Educ Behav. 2021;53 (9):732-741. doi: 10.1016/j.jneb.2021.05.010. PubMed PMID:34315678
  8. Tallapragada, M, Hardy, BW, Lybrand, E, Hallman, WK. Impact of Abstract Versus Concrete Conceptualization of Genetic Modification (GM) Technology on Public Perceptions. Risk Anal. 2021;41 (6):976-991. doi: 10.1111/risa.13591. PubMed PMID:32984992
  9. Hallman, WK, Hallman, WK 2nd. An empirical assessment of common or usual names to label cell-based seafood products. J Food Sci. 2020;85 (8):2267-2277. doi: 10.1111/1750-3841.15351. PubMed PMID:32691419 PubMed Central PMC7496225
  10. Berhaupt-Glickstein, A, Hooker, NH, Hallman, WK. Qualified Health Claim Language affects Purchase Intentions for Green Tea Products in the United States. Nutrients. 2019;11 (4):. doi: 10.3390/nu11040921. PubMed PMID:31022930 PubMed Central PMC6521090
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Deanna Harper
Rutgers UniversityEOHSI – Clinical Research and Occupational Medicine
Photo of Fatima Haynes
Fatima Haynes
Ph.D. Student Advisor: Dr. Robert Laumbach
Tasha Hester, MS
Lab Technician – Dr. Bernstein’s Lab Rutgers UniversityEOHSI – Toxicology
Jun-Yan Hong
Rutgers School of Publc HealthEOHSI- Clinical Research and Occupational Medicine
Yi-Hua Jan, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor Rutgers UniversityEOHSI- Toxicology
Photo of Frederick Kauffman Ph.D.
Frederick Kauffman, Ph.D.
Professor Emeritus Rutgers University – Ernest Mario School of PharmacyEOHSI – Toxicology

Research Areas

Biochemical Pharmacology and Toxicology. A major focus of work has been to define events regulating the metabolism of drugs and foreign chemicals in intact cells and tissues. Emphasis has been directed primarily at the metabolism of biologically active compounds via Phase II conjugation reactions. Recent research projects include: identifying isoforms of sulfotransferase and sulfatase in neural tissue, and investigating their possible involvement in modulating levels and activities of neuorsteroids in the central nervous system; and, secondly using a unique model of estrogen-dependent mammary tumors in ACI rats to explore relationships between the metabolism of estradiol and the occurrence and progression of hormone-dependent breast tumors.

Scholarly Activities

  • Fogarty Senior International Fellow, Department of Molecular Pathology, Ninewells Hospital and Medical School. University of Dundee, Scotland. Jan. 1995-Aug.1995, and subsequent summers 1996 and 1997.
  • Visiting Professor, Department of Pharmacology, Escola Paulista de Medicina. Sao Paulo, Brazil. December, 1993-Feb. 1994
  • Visiting Scholar, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Duke University. Summer, 1988.

Recent Publications

  1. Mesia-Vela, S, Sanchez, RI, Roberts, KG, Reuhl, KR, Conney, AH, Kauffman, FC. Dietary clofibrate stimulates the formation and size of estradiol-induced breast tumors in female August-Copenhagen Irish (ACI) rats. Toxicology. 2008;246 (1):63-72. doi: 10.1016/j.tox.2007.12.025. PubMed PMID:18280627 PubMed Central PMC2441444
  2. Stakhiv, TM, Mesia-Vela, S, Kauffman, FC. Phase II antioxidant enzyme activities in brain of male and female ACI rats treated chronically with estradiol. Brain Res. 2006;1104 (1):80-91. doi: 10.1016/j.brainres.2006.05.093. PubMed PMID:16822482
  3. Mesia-Vela, S, Sanchez, RI, Reuhl, KR, Conney, AH, Kauffman, FC. Phenobarbital treatment inhibits the formation of estradiol-dependent mammary tumors in the August-Copenhagen Irish rat. J Pharmacol Exp Ther. 2006;317 (2):590-7. doi: 10.1124/jpet.105.096867. PubMed PMID:16421288
  4. Kauffman, FC. Sulfonation in pharmacology and toxicology. Drug Metab Rev. 2004;36 (3-4):823-43. doi: 10.1081/dmr-200033496. PubMed PMID:15554249
  5. Sanchez, RI, Mesia-Vela, S, Kauffman, FC. Induction of NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase and glutathione S-transferase activities in livers of female August-Copenhagen Irish rats treated chronically with estradiol: comparison with the Sprague-Dawley rat. J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 2003;87 (2-3):199-206. doi: 10.1016/j.jsbmb.2003.08.007. PubMed PMID:14672740
  6. Mesia-Vela, S, Sanchez, RI, Li, JJ, Li, SA, Conney, AH, Kauffman, FC. Catechol estrogen formation in liver microsomes from female ACI and Sprague-Dawley rats: comparison of 2- and 4-hydroxylation revisited. Carcinogenesis. 2002;23 (8):1369-72. doi: 10.1093/carcin/23.8.1369. PubMed PMID:12151356
  7. Pignatello, MA, Kauffman, FC, Levin, AA. Liarozole markedly increases all trans-retinoic acid toxicity in mouse limb bud cell cultures: a model to explain the potency of the aromatic retinoid (E)-4-[2-(5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-5,5,8,8-tetramethyl-2-naphthylenyl)-1-propenyl] benzoic acid. Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 2002;178 (3):186-94. doi: 10.1006/taap.2001.9340. PubMed PMID:11858735
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Photo of Georgios Kelesidis Ph.D.
Georgios Kelesidis, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor Rutgers UniversityEOHSI Division of Environmental and Population Health Biosciences

Biographical Info

Dr. Kelesidis is an Assistant Professor at the Rutgers University School of Public Health. He received his Diploma in Chemical Engineering from University of Patras (Greece), a M.Sc. and a Ph.D. in Mechanical and Process Engineering from ETH Zurich (Switzerland). Before joining Rutgers University, he was a lecturer and research associate at the Particle Technology Laboratory of ETH Zurich (Switzerland).

Research Areas

The research of Dr. Kelesidis focuses on the climate and public health impact of carbonaceous aerosols. To this end, he has developed advanced computational algorithms during his M.Sc. and Ph.D. studies that simulate in detail the morphology, optical properties and climate forcing of organic and black carbon (soot) nanoparticles. His models were able to explain several observations made over the past 20 years in various laboratories across the world. In collaboration with Siemens AG, these models have been used for the design of robust laser diagnostics (e.g. smoke detectors) for fast detection and prevention of fires. His recent research involves the design of novel platforms for the controlled, high-throughput aerosol synthesis of carbonaceous nanoparticles that emulate real world emissions. This enables the detailed physicochemical and toxicological characterization of such pollutants and facilitates the accurate estimation and mitigation of their contribution to global warming. The aerosol-based platforms developed here are also used for the design of functional nanomaterials with superior performance in energy, sensor and biomedical applications.

The 2015 M.Sc. thesis of Dr. Kelesidis at ETH Zurich earned the IBM research prize (2017) for computer modelling and simulations in chemistry, biology and material science. His 2019 Ph.D. thesis on the morphology and optical properties of flame-made nanoparticles received the 2020 Ph.D. Award from GAeF (German Association for Aerosol Research) and the ETH medal for Outstanding Doctoral Thesis (top 8 %). He received also the 1st Graduate Student Award on Carbon Nanomaterials at the 2019 AIChE Annual Meeting (Orlando, FL, USA), as well as Best Poster Awards at the European Aerosol Conference in 2016 (Tours, France) and 2020 (Aachen, Germany), the 2019 ETH Conference on Combustion Generated Nanoparticles (Zürich, Switzerland) and the 2019 Fall Meeting of the Material Research Society. The societal impact of his Ph.D. research was also highlighted by the Forbes Magazine by including him in the 2020 Forbes 30 under 30 Europe list for Science & Healthcare. He has co-authored 21 peer-reviewed articles so far, being the first author in 16 of them.

Research Highlights

  • Advanced computational algorithms for the morphology (doi.org/10.1016/j.carbon.2017.06.004), optical properties (doi.org/10.1016/j.proci.2018.08.025) and climate impact (doi.org/10.1021/acs.est.2c00428) of carbonaceous aerosols.
  • High-throughput, aerosol synthesis and physicochemical characterization of organic (doi.org/10.1080/02786826.2022.2070055) and inorganic (doi.org/10.1021/acs.langmuir.8b00576) nanomaterials.
  • Design of laser diagnostics (e.g. smoke detectors) for fire detection & prevention (doi.org/10.1016/j.powtec.2019.02.003).
  • Optimization of nanoparticle size, morphology and porosity for energy (doi.org/10.1016/j.carbon.2022.06.020), sensor (doi.org/10.1021/acs.analchem.1c05145) and biomedical (doi.org/10.1021/acsnano.7b05518) applications.

Scholarly Activities

  • Member of the leadership team on Laminar Flames and Chemistry and Particle Formation of the International Sooting Flame Workshop.
  • Co-chair of the Aerosol Technology Working Group of the European Aerosol Assembly.
  • Session chair for the 2019-2021 European (EAC) and 2022 International Aerosol Conferences (IAC), the 2020-2022 Annual Conferences of the American Association for Aerosol Research (AAAR), the 2022 World Congress on Particle Technology and the 2016 Fall Meeting of the Material Research Society.

Publications

  • Kelesidis, G.A., Crepaldi, P., Allemann, M., Duric, A. and Pratsinis, S.E., “The mobility diameter of soot determines its angular light scattering distribution”, Combustion and Flame, (2023) accepted; doi: 10.1016/j.combustflame.2022.112476.
  • Kelesidis, G.A., Rossi, N. and Pratsinis, S.E., “Porosity and crystallinity dynamics of carbon black during internal and surface oxidation”, Carbon 197, 334-340 (2022).

3 min talk @ 6th International Sooting Flame Workshop, Vancouver, Canada (Best 3-min presentation award).

12 min talk @ 11th International Aerosol Conference, Athens, Greece.

  • Kelesidis, G.A., Neubauer, D., Fan, L.-S., Lohmann, U. and Pratsinis, S.E., “Enhanced direct radiative forcing by black carbon agglomerates”, Environmental Science and Technology 56, 8610-8618 (2022).

11 min talk @ 39th Annual (Virtual) Conference of the American Association for Aerosol Research (AAAR).

  • Trivanovic, U., Kelesidis, G.A. and Pratsinis, S.E., “High-throughput generation of aircraft-like soot”, Aerosol Science and Technology 56, 732-743 (2022).
  • Kelesidis, G.A., Gao, D., Starsich, F.H.L. and Pratsinis, S.E., “Light extinction by agglomerates of gold nanoparticles: A plasmon ruler for sub-10 nm interparticle distances”, Analytical Chemistry 94, 5310-5316 (2022).
  • Kelesidis, G.A. and Pratsinis, S.E., “Santoro flame: the volume fraction of soot accounting for its morphology and composition”, Combustion and Flame, 240, 112025-1-5 (2022).

12 min talk @ 39th Annual (Virtual) Conference of the American Association for Aerosol Research (AAAR).

  • Kelesidis, G.A. and Pratsinis, S.E., “A perspective on gas-phase synthesis of nanomaterials: Process design, impact and outlook”, Chemical Engineering Journal 421, 129884-1-7 (2021).
  • Kelesidis, G.A. and Kholghy, M.R., “A Monodisperse Population Balance Model for Nanoparticle Agglomeration in the Transition Regime”, Materials 14, 3882-1-13 (2021).
  • Kelesidis, G.A. and Pratsinis, S.E., “Determination of the volume fraction of soot accounting for its composition and morphology”, Proc. of the Combustion Institute 38, 1189-1196 (2021).

15 min talk @ 2021 International Symposium on Combustion (Virtual), Adelaide, Australia.

  • Kelesidis, G.A. and Goudeli, E., “Self-preserving size distribution and collision frequency of flame-made nanoparticles in the transition regime”, Proc. of the Combustion Institute 38, 1233-1240 (2021).
  • Kelesidis, G.A., Bruun, A. and Pratsinis, S.E., “The impact of organic carbon on soot light absorption”, Carbon, 172, 742-749 (2021).

3 min talk @ 2020 European Aerosol Conference (Virtual), Aachen, Germany (Best Poster Award).

  • Kholghy, M.R. and Kelesidis, G.A., “Surface growth, coagulation and oxidation of soot by a monodisperse population balance model”, Combustion and Flame, 227, 456-463 (2021).
  • Kelesidis, G.A., Kholghy, M.R., Zuercher, J., Robertz, J., Allemann, M., Duric, A. and Pratsinis, S.E., “Light scattering from nanoparticle agglomerates”, Powder Technology 365, 52-59 (2020).
  • Kelesidis, G.A. and Pratsinis, S.E., “Soot light absorption and refractive index during agglomeration and surface growth”, Proc. of the Combustion Institute 37, 1177-1184 (2019).
  • Kelesidis, G.A. and Pratsinis, S.E., “Estimating the internal and surface oxidation of soot agglomerates”, Combustion and Flame 209, 493-499 (2019).

3 min talk @ 2020 European Aerosol Conference (Virtual), Aachen, Germany.

  • Kelesidis, G.A., Furrer, F.M., Wegner, K. and Pratsinis, S.E., “Impact of humidity on silica nanoparticle agglomerate morphology and size distribution”, Langmuir 34, 8532-8541 (2018).

12 min talk @ 2020 European Aerosol Conference (Virtual), Aachen, Germany.

  • Kholghy, M.R., Kelesidis, G.A. and Pratsinis, S.E., “Reactive polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon dimerization drives soot nucleation”, Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics 20, 10926-10938 & Erratum, ibid 20, 28941-28942 (2018).
  • Kelesidis, G.A., Goudeli, E. and Pratsinis, S.E., “Morphology and Mobility Diameter of Carbonaceous Aerosols by Agglomeration and Surface Growth”, Carbon 121, 527-535 (2017).
  • Pratsinis, A., Kelesidis, G.A., Zuercher, S., Krumeich, F., Bolisetty, S., Mezzenga, R., Leroux, J.C. and Sotiriou, G.A., “Enzyme-mimetic antioxidant luminescent nanoparticles for highly sensitive hydrogen peroxide biosensing”, ACS Nano 11, 12210-12218 (2017).
  • Kelesidis, G.A., Goudeli, E. and Pratsinis, S.E., “Flame synthesis of functional materials and devices: Surface growth and aggregation”, Proc. of the Combustion Institute 36, 29-50 (2017).
  • Dimakopoulos, Y., Kelesidis, G.A., Tsouka, S., Georgiou, G.C. and Tsamopoulos, J., “Hemodynamics in stenotic vessels of small diameter under steady state conditions: Effect of viscoelasticity and migration of red blood cells”, Biorheology 52, 183-210 (2015).

 

Eunchong (Joe) Kim
Laboratory Manager Rutgers UniversityEOHSI – Pharmacology and Toxicology
Photo of Howard Kipen MPH. MD
Howard Kipen, MPH. MD
Professor, Department of Occupational and Environmental Health Rutgers University – School of Public HealthEOHSI – Director, Clinical Research and Occupational Medicine

Dr. Kipen received his BA from UC Berkeley and his MD from UC San Francisco and MPH from Columbia University.  He completed an internal medicine residency at the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, and a fellowship at Mount Sinai Medical  Center, Environmental Sciences Laboratory, in Manhattan.

Research Areas

Dr. Kipen’s research focuses on clinical and epidemiological studies of the health effects of ambient and indoor air pollution. He works closely with Rob Laumbach of the CROM division as well as Debra Laskin and Andrew Gow of Toxicology. They use both controlled human  exposure models and real-world clinical studies to develop and test mechanistic biomarkers of air pollution toxicity. Concentrating on biomarkers of cardiopulmonary effects, prior studies have examined fresh diesel exhaust and secondary organic aerosols. We are currently studying effects of controlled ozone exposures on macrophage phenotypes in induced sputum.   Working in the real world, we have examined cardiopulmonary and oxidative stress outcomes in highway passengers who were driven in a diesel-enriched enriched environment. More recently we examined the ability of portable air cleaners to reduce indoor particulate air pollution and consequent biomarkers of cardiopulmonary health in elderly apartment dwellers.   In light of the current pandemic we have used our experience measuring and filtering particulates in homes to examine SARS-coV-2  aerosols in patient homes.  A more recent interest is to explore underlying mechanisms for the robust human finding of acute cognitive impairment from inhaled CO2 at commonly encountered levels.

Research Highlights

With former EOHSI members Jim Zhang and David Rich, we conducted a panel study of 130 Beijing medical students built around the Chinese Government’s drastic reductions in air pollution during the 2008 Olympics. We observed broad declines in multiple oxidative stress, inflammatory, and platelet activation biomarkers. Major results have been published in JAMA and the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine with multiple subsidiary papers and a complete report published by the Health Effects Institute. We have Analogous increases in vascular and pulmonary oxidative stress  have ben demonstrated after a 90 minute ride on the NJ Turnpike. Similar findings have been found using controlled exposure to fresh diesel exhaust iin our controlled environment  facility. Related effects have been shown with New Jersey air pollution on the Turnpike and are being evaluated with air cleaners in individual homes.

Significant declines in proteasome (UPP) activity after exposure to secondary organic aerosol and diesel exhaust were observed immediately following exposure in healthy subjects, although our prior work did not reveal apparent nasal inflammatory effects from acute exposures to secondary organic aerosol. The above declines in proteasome activity showed a significant interaction (3-fold increase) in subjects with the ILE/ILE polymorphism of GSTP1.

Scholarly Activities

  • Chair, NASA Human Research Program’s Advanced Environmental Health / Advanced Food Technology Standing Review Panel (2015-2018)
  • Chair, Scientific Assembly on Environmental, Occupational, and Population Health, American Thoracic Society (2017-2019)
  • Member, National Academies Standing Committee on Medical and Epidemiological Aspects of Air Pollution on U.S. Government Employees and their Families, 2016-2021.
  • Director, Integrated Health Sciences Facility Core, Rutgers Center for Environmental Exposures and Disease (CEED), NIEHS
  • Chair / Member Multiple Ad Hoc Grant Review Panels (e.g., NIEHS, Department of Defense)
  • Governor’s Appointee, Public Employee’s Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission, New Jersey Department of Labor
  • Member, Public Health Scientific Advisory Board, New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection

Howard Kipen’s Publications

Recent Publications

  1. Ji N, Fang M1. 11.Baptista A, Cepeda C, Greenberg M, Mincey IC, Ohman-Strickland P, Haynes F, Fiedler N, Kipen HM, Laumbach RJ. Exposure to traffic-related airpollution and changes in exhaled nitric oxide and DNA methylation in arginase andnitric oxide synthase in children with asthma. Environ Health. 2021 Feb 11; 20(1):12. doi: 10.1186/s12940-020-00678-8. PMID: 33573660; PMCID: PMC7879528
  2. Laumbach RJ, Mainelis G, Black KG, Myers NT, Ohman-Strickland P, Alimokhtari S, Hastings S, Legard A, De Resende A, Calderón L, Lu FT, Kipen HM. Presence of SARS-CoV-2 Aerosol in Residences of Adults with COVID-19. Ann Am Thorac Soc. 2021 Nov 11. doi: 10.1513/AnnalsATS.202107-847RL. Epub ahead of print. PMID: 34762562.
  3. Hussain, S., Laumbach, R., Coleman, J., Youssef, H., Kelly-McNeil, K., Ohman-Strickland, P., Zhang, J., & Kipen, H.M. Controlled Exposure to Diesel Exhaust Causes Increased Nitrite in Exhaled Breath Condensate among Subjects with Asthma.  J Occup Environ Med 54(10): 1186-91, Oct 2012. PMCID: PMC4443752

Other Publications

  1. Yang, Z, Black, K, Ohman-Strickland, P, Graber, JM, Kipen, HM, Fang, M, Zarbl, H. Disruption of central and peripheral circadian clocks and circadian controlled estrogen receptor rhythms in night shift nurses in working environments. FASEB J. 2024;38 (11):e23719. doi: 10.1096/fj.202302261RR. PubMed PMID:38837828
  2. Lu, FT, Laumbach, RJ, Legard, A, Myers, NT, Black, KG, Ohman-Strickland, P, Alimokhtari, S, de Resende, A, Calderón, L, Mainelis, G et al.. Real-World Effectiveness of Portable Air Cleaners in Reducing Home Particulate Matter Concentrations. Aerosol Air Qual Res. 2024;24 (1):. doi: 10.4209/aaqr.230202. PubMed PMID:38618024 PubMed Central PMC11014421
  3. Caruth, J, Black, K, Legard, A, De Resende, A, Getz, K, Borowski, M, Debilio, L, Brewer, A, Kipen, H, Udasin, IG et al.. Incidence and Predictors of COVID-19 Infection in Prison Healthcare Workers. J Occup Environ Med. 2023;65 (7):573-579. doi: 10.1097/JOM.0000000000002836. PubMed PMID:36882811 PubMed Central PMC10329989
  4. Gholizadeh, A, Black, K, Kipen, H, Laumbach, R, Gow, A, Weisel, C, Javanmard, M. Detection of respiratory inflammation biomarkers in non-processed exhaled breath condensate samples using reduced graphene oxide. RSC Adv. 2022;12 (55):35627-35638. doi: 10.1039/d2ra05764f. PubMed PMID:36545081 PubMed Central PMC9745889
  5. Myers, NT, Laumbach, RJ, Black, KG, Ohman-Strickland, P, Alimokhtari, S, Legard, A, De Resende, A, Calderón, L, Lu, FT, Mainelis, G et al.. Portable air cleaners and residential exposure to SARS-CoV-2 aerosols: A real-world study. Indoor Air. 2022;32 (4):e13029. doi: 10.1111/ina.13029. PubMed PMID:35481935 PubMed Central PMC9111720
  6. Laumbach, RJ, Mainelis, G, Black, KG, Myers, NT, Ohman-Strickland, P, Alimokhtari, S, Hastings, S, Legard, A, de Resende, A, Calderón, L et al.. Presence of SARS-CoV-2 Aerosol in Residences of Adults with COVID-19. Ann Am Thorac Soc. 2022;19 (2):338-341. doi: 10.1513/AnnalsATS.202107-847RL. PubMed PMID:34762562 PubMed Central PMC8867362
  7. Zhang, JJ, Kan, H, Kipen, HM. Respiratory health, children's lung function, and air quality in four Chinese cities: two snapshots in 1993-1996 and 2017-2018. J Thorac Dis. 2020;12 (10):6311-6314. doi: 10.21037/jtd-19-crh-aq-preface. PubMed PMID:33209470 PubMed Central PMC7656390
  8. Malaviya, R, Kipen, HM, Businaro, R, Laskin, JD, Laskin, DL. Pulmonary toxicants and fibrosis: innate and adaptive immune mechanisms. Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 2020;409 :115272. doi: 10.1016/j.taap.2020.115272. PubMed PMID:33031836 PubMed Central PMC9960630
  9. Radbel, J, Laskin, DL, Laskin, JD, Kipen, HM. Disease-modifying treatment of chemical threat agent-induced acute lung injury. Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2020;1480 (1):14-29. doi: 10.1111/nyas.14438. PubMed PMID:32726497 PubMed Central PMC10250775
  10. Kipen, HM, Laskin, DL. NETs: a new biomarker of traffic-related air pollution exposure: are they ready to catch fish?. Eur Respir J. 2020;55 (4):. doi: 10.1183/13993003.00305-2020. PubMed PMID:32245775 PubMed Central PMC10250776
  11. Sunil, VR, Radbel, J, Hussain, S, Vayas, KN, Cervelli, J, Deen, M, Kipen, H, Udasin, I, Laumbach, R, Sunderram, J et al.. Sarcoid-Like Granulomatous Disease: Pathologic Case Series in World Trade Center Dust Exposed Rescue and Recovery Workers. Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2019;16 (5):. doi: 10.3390/ijerph16050815. PubMed PMID:30845693 PubMed Central PMC6427752
  12. Chiao, S, Kipen, H, Hallman, WK, Pollio, DE, North, CS. Anthrax Exposure, Belief in Exposure, and Postanthrax Symptoms Among Survivors of a Bioterrorist Attack on Capitol Hill. Disaster Med Public Health Prep. 2019;13 (3):555-560. doi: 10.1017/dmp.2018.115. PubMed PMID:30417804
  13. Fiedler, N, Weisel, C, Nwankwo, C, Kipen, H, Lange, G, Ohman-Strickland, P, Laumbach, R. Chronic Exposure to Solvents Among Construction Painters: Reductions in Exposure and Neurobehavioral Health Effects. J Occup Environ Med. 2018;60 (12):e663-e670. doi: 10.1097/JOM.0000000000001470. PubMed PMID:30308619 PubMed Central PMC6289817
  14. Gholizadeh, A, Voiry, D, Weisel, C, Gow, A, Laumbach, R, Kipen, H, Chhowalla, M, Javanmard, M. Toward point-of-care management of chronic respiratory conditions: Electrochemical sensing of nitrite content in exhaled breath condensate using reduced graphene oxide. Microsyst Nanoeng. 2017;3 :17022. doi: 10.1038/micronano.2017.22. PubMed PMID:31057865 PubMed Central PMC6444995
  15. Thurston, GD, Kipen, H, Annesi-Maesano, I, Balmes, J, Brook, RD, Cromar, K, De Matteis, S, Forastiere, F, Forsberg, B, Frampton, MW et al.. A joint ERS/ATS policy statement: what constitutes an adverse health effect of air pollution? An analytical framework. Eur Respir J. 2017;49 (1):. doi: 10.1183/13993003.00419-2016. PubMed PMID:28077473 PubMed Central PMC5751718
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Photo of Ah-Ng Tony Kong Ph.D.
Ah-Ng Tony Kong, Ph.D.
Glaxo Endowed Chair in Pharmaceutics; Graduate Director Rutgers UniversityErnest Mario School of Pharmacy

 

Grants/FundingDr. Kong is currently funded by NIH R01CA200129, R01AT007065 and R01AT009152.
Education & TrainingPhD – Pharmaceutics, Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics – State University of New York, Buffalo, NY
BS – Pharmacy with First Class Standing – University of Alberta, Canada
Post-Doctoral Fellowship – Molecular Biology of Phase I/Phase II Drug Metabolizing Enzymes – National Institutes of Health
Post-Doctoral Fellowship – Cellular and Molecular Signaling of T-cell Activation – National Institutes of Health
Research InterestsNatural & Botanical Products Drug Discovery & Development, Epigenetics/epigenomics of oxidative stress/inflammation induced diseases including cancer and their prevention/treatment with botanicals/phytochemicals/drugs, Nrf2-mediated anti-oxidative stress/inflammation, Pharmacokinetics (PK)/pharmacodynamics (PD) studies and modeling. Dr. Kong’s current research focuses on, 1) Studies of botanical/dietary/herbal medicinal phytochemicals-mediated epigenetics/epigenomics signaling and diseases prevention such as cancer chemoprevention, 2) Nrf2-mediated redox signaling in anti-oxidative stress, anti-inflammatory, and Phase II drug metabolizing enzymes (DME) /Phase III transporters, 3) Pharmacokinetics (PK)/ pharmacodynamics (PD) studies and PKPD modeling of botanicals/dietary phytochemicals/drugs. Dr. Kong is currently funded by NIH R01CA200129, and R01AT009152.
Scholarly Activities– Member, President’s Committee on Academic Program (CAPR)
– Director of the Graduate Program in Pharmaceutical Sciences
– Founding Editor-in-Chief, Current Pharmacology Reports (Springer)
– Serving on NIH study section panels

Publications

Awards2018 – Clarivate Analytics (formerly Thomson Reuters) Highly Cited Researcher – among an elite group recognized for exceptional research performance demonstrated by production of multiple highly cited papers that rank in the top 1% by citations for field and year in Web of Science.
2018 – Overseas Visiting Professor, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand.
2016 – Fellow (Elected), American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
2014 – Thomson Reuters Highly Cited Researcher – in recognition of ranking among the top 1% of researchers for most cited documents, in Pharmacology and Toxicology
2013 – Visiting Professor, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, China
2012 – Visiting Professor, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China
2011 – Guest Professor, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing, China
2009-2013 – Elected Member-at-Large, American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
2004 – Fellow (Elected), American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists (AAPS)
2003 – Alumni Association Distinguished Visitor” under the Alumni Association Rotating Visiting Professorship Program, The King Edward VII College of Medicine and The Faculties of Medicine, Universities of Malaya and Singapore
1998 – Recognized by the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy as Teacher of the Year
1998 – “Outstanding Teacher of the Year Award” from the first professional year class, University of Illinois at Chicago College of Pharmacy
1996 – “Outstanding Teacher of the Year Award” from the first professional year class, University of Illinois at Chicago College of Pharmacy
1994 – Young Investigator Award in Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics and Drug Metabolism from the American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists (AAPS), Sponsored by Burroughs Wellcome Fund

 

Photo of Bo Kong Ph.D.
Bo Kong, Ph.D.
Rutgers UniversityEOHSI – Exposure Science and Epidemiology
Photo of Debra L Laskin Ph.D
Debra L Laskin, Ph.D
Distinguished Professor and Chair Roy A. Bowers Endowed Chair Rutgers University – Ernest Mario School of PharmacyEOHSI – Toxicology

Research Areas

The overall focus of our research is immunotoxicology. We are particularly interested in inflammatory mechanisms of tissue injury. Our focus is on macrophages. Although the involvement of macrophages in protecting against invading pathogens and tumor cells is well documented, studies from my laboratory have demonstrated that macrophages also have a “dark side”. Thus, they can be activated to release excessive quantities of proinflammatory and cytotoxic mediators that actually promote tissue injury. An analysis of this process represents the main focus of our research. Two rodent models are being utilized to investigate the role of macrophages and inflammatory mediators in toxicity: the lung and the liver. In each of these tissues, we found that exposure of animals to xenobiotics such as acetaminophen and endotoxin in the liver and ozone, nano/microparticles, mustard vesicants, and chlorine is associated with localized accumulation of macrophages. Moreover, macrophages isolated from the lung or liver of animals treated with tissue specific toxicants are “activated” to release increased quantities of inflammatory mediators such as tumor necrosis factor alpha, nitric oxide and superoxide anion. To analyze the role of these cytotoxic mediators in toxicity, both pharmacologic inhibitors and transgenic mice are being utilized. Another aspect of our studies is to elucidate biochemical and molecular mechanisms mediating macrophage activation in the lung. This has involved investigations on signaling molecules, transcription factors, epigenetic regulators and microvesicles. We have also begun to assess the role of macrophages in tissue repair with a focus on impaired resolution of inflammation as a mechanism underlying tissue injury.

Research Highlights

  • Demonstrated that macrophages and inflammatory contribute to tissue injury induced by diverse pulmonary and hepatic toxicants
  • Discovered that pulmonary injury induced by ozone is mediated by cytotoxic reactive nitrogen species
  • Demonstrated that macrophage derived tumor necrosis factor –alpha plays a key role in both tissue injury and tissue repair
  • Identified distinct macrophage subpopulations that play unique role in tissue injury and tissue repair

Recent Awards and Honors

  • Rutgers Biomedical Health Sciences Lifetime Distinguished Achievement Award (2022)
  • Rutgers Biomedical Health Sciences Chancellor Distinguished Mentor Award (2021)
  • American Society of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics (ASPET), Toxicology Division Career Investigator Award (2021)
  • Society of Toxicology, Mechanisms Specialty Section Career Investigator Award (2018)
  • Society of Toxicology Education Award (2017)
  • Society of Toxicology, Inhalation and Respiratory Specialty Section Career Investigator Award (2015)
  • Society of Toxicology, Women in Toxicology Mentoring Award (2014)
  • Rutgers University Board of Trustees Award for Excellence in Research (2009)
  • Rutgers University Board of Trustees Award for Excellence in Research (2009)
  • Dermatology Specialty Section, Society of Toxicology, “Paper of the Year” Award (2009)
  • Named Roy Bowers Endowed Chair, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy (2007)

Other Recent Activities

  • Member, Scientific Advisory Board, Research institute of Fragrance Materials (2023-present)
  • President; Inhalation and Respiratory Specialty Section, Society of Toxicology 2018-2019
  • Vice Chair-elect: Inhalation and Respiratory Specialty Section, Society of Toxicology (2016-present)
  • Chair, Toxicology Division, American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics (2014-2015)
  • Member, NIH Systemic Injury by Environmental Exposure (SIEE) Review Panel (2014-2019)
  • Deputy Director NIEHS Center for Environmental Exposures and Disease (2009-present)
  • Associate Editor, Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology (2001-present)
  • Director Flow Cytometry/Cell Sorting and Confocal Microscopy Core Facility, EOHSI (1986-present)

Recent Publications

  1. Smith, LC, Abramova, H, Vayas, K, Rodriguez, J, Gelfand-Titiyevksiy, B, Roepke, T, Laskin, JD, Gow, AJ, Laskin, DL. Transcriptional profiling of lung macrophages following ozone exposure in mice identifies signaling pathways regulating immunometabolic activation. Toxicol Sci. 2024; :. doi: 10.1093/toxsci/kfae081. PubMed PMID:38897669
  2. Radbel, J, Meshanni, JA, Vayas, KN, Le-Hoang, O, Abramova, E, Zhou, P, Joseph, LB, Laskin, JD, Gow, AJ, Laskin, DL et al.. Effects of ozone exposure on lung injury, inflammation, and oxidative stress in a murine model of non-pneumonic endotoxemia. Toxicol Sci. 2024; :. doi: 10.1093/toxsci/kfae062. PubMed PMID:38749002
  3. Bellomo, A, Herbert, J, Kudlak, MJ, Laskin, JD, Gow, AJ, Laskin, DL. Identification of early events in nitrogen mustard pulmonary toxicity that are independent of infiltrating inflammatory cells using precision cut lung slices. Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 2024;486 :116941. doi: 10.1016/j.taap.2024.116941. PubMed PMID:38677601
  4. Malaviya, R, Meshanni, JA, Sunil, VR, Venosa, A, Guo, C, Abramova, EV, Vayas, KN, Jiang, C, Cervelli, JA, Gow, AJ et al.. Role of macrophage bioenergetics in N-acetylcysteine-mediated mitigation of lung injury and oxidative stress induced by nitrogen mustard. Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 2024;485 :116908. doi: 10.1016/j.taap.2024.116908. PubMed PMID:38513841
  5. Gutierrez, B, Aggarwal, T, Erguven, H, Stone, MRL, Guo, C, Bellomo, A, Abramova, E, Stevenson, ER, Laskin, DL, Gow, AJ et al.. Direct assessment of nitrative stress in lipid environments: Applications of a designer lipid-based biosensor for peroxynitrite. iScience. 2023;26 (12):108567. doi: 10.1016/j.isci.2023.108567. PubMed PMID:38144454 PubMed Central PMC10746523
  6. Laskin, JD, Ozkuyumcu, K, Zhou, P, Croutch, CR, Heck, DE, Laskin, DL, Joseph, LB. Skin Models Used to Define Mechanisms of Action of Sulfur Mustard. Disaster Med Public Health Prep. 2023;17 :e551. doi: 10.1017/dmp.2023.177. PubMed PMID:37849329
  7. Malaviya, R, Laskin, JD, Businaro, R, Laskin, DL. Targeting Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha to Mitigate Lung Injury Induced by Mustard Vesicants and Radiation. Disaster Med Public Health Prep. 2023;17 :e553. doi: 10.1017/dmp.2023.178. PubMed PMID:37848400 PubMed Central PMC10841250
  8. Smith, LC, Gow, AJ, Abramova, E, Vayas, K, Guo, C, Noto, J, Lyman, J, Rodriquez, J, Gelfand-Titiyevskiy, B, Malcolm, C et al.. Role of PPARγ in dyslipidemia and altered pulmonary functioning in mice following ozone exposure. Toxicol Sci. 2023;194 (1):109-119. doi: 10.1093/toxsci/kfad048. PubMed PMID:37202362 PubMed Central PMC10306402
  9. Meshanni, JA, Lee, JM, Vayas, KN, Sun, R, Jiang, C, Guo, GL, Gow, AJ, Laskin, JD, Laskin, DL. Suppression of Lung Oxidative Stress, Inflammation, and Fibrosis following Nitrogen Mustard Exposure by the Selective Farnesoid X Receptor Agonist Obeticholic Acid. J Pharmacol Exp Ther. 2024;388 (2):586-595. doi: 10.1124/jpet.123.001557. PubMed PMID:37188530 PubMed Central PMC10801770
  10. Cary, CM, Seymore, TN, Singh, D, Vayas, KN, Goedken, MJ, Adams, S, Polunas, M, Sunil, VR, Laskin, DL, Demokritou, P et al.. Single inhalation exposure to polyamide micro and nanoplastic particles impairs vascular dilation without generating pulmonary inflammation in virgin female Sprague Dawley rats. Part Fibre Toxicol. 2023;20 (1):16. doi: 10.1186/s12989-023-00525-x. PubMed PMID:37088832 PubMed Central PMC10122824
Search PubMed
  1. Sunil, VR, Vayas, KN, Fang, M, Zarbl, H, Massa, C, Gow, AJ, Cervelli, JA, Kipen, H, Laumbach, RJ, Lioy, PJ et al.. World Trade Center (WTC) dust exposure in mice is associated with inflammation, oxidative stress and epigenetic changes in the lung. Exp. Mol. Pathol. 2017;102 (1):50-58. doi: 1016/j.yexmp.2016.12.005. PubMed PMID:27986442
  2. Francis, M, Groves, AM, Sun, R, Cervelli, JA, Choi, H, Laskin, JD, Laskin, DL. Editor’s Highlight: CCR2 Regulates Inflammatory Cell Accumulation in the Lung and Tissue Injury following Ozone Exposure. Toxicol. Sci. 2017;155 (2):474-484. doi: 1093/toxsci/kfw226. PubMed PMID:27837169
  3. Francis, M, Sun, R, Cervelli, JA, Choi, H, Mandal, M, Abramova, EV, Gow, AJ, Laskin, JD, Laskin, DL. Editor’s Highlight: Role of Spleen-Derived Macrophages in Ozone-Induced Lung Inflammation and Injury. Toxicol. Sci. 2017;155 (1):182-195. doi: 1093/toxsci/kfw192. PubMed PMID:27708193
  4. Mandal, M, Gardner, CR, Sun R, Choi H, Lad S, Mishin V, Laskin JD, Laskin DL. The spleen as an extramedullary source of inflammatory cells responding to acetaminophen-induced live injury. Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 2017; 304: 110-120. doi:1016/j.taap.2016.04.019.  PMCID: PMC5147741
  5. Venosa A, Malaviya R, Gow AJ, Hall L, Laskin JD, Laskin DL. Protective role of spleen-derived macrophages in lung inflammation, injury and fibrosis induced by nitrogen mustard. Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol. 2015 Dec 15;309(12):L1487-98. doi: 10.1152/ajplung.00276.2015. PMID: 26475734 PMCID: PMC4683320 DOI: 10.1152/ajplung.00276.2015
  6. Malaviya R, Sunil VR, Venosa A, Verissimo VL, Cervelli JA, Vayas KN, Hall L, Laskin JD, Laskin DL. Attenuation of nitrogen mustard-induced pulmonary injury and fibrosis by anti-tumor necrosis factor antibody/Toxicol Sci. 2015 Nov;148(1):71-88. doi: 10.1093/toxsci/kfv161.
Photo of Jeffrey D Laskin Ph.D.
Jeffrey D Laskin, Ph.D.
Distinguished Professor & Director, Division of Toxicology Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences InstituteEOHSI – Toxicology

Distinguished Professor
Department of Environmental & Occupational Health
Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute
Rutgers University School of Public Health, Piscataway, NJ

Director of the Division of Toxicology
Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute (EOHSI)
Rutgers University School of Public Health, Piscataway, NJ

Director
Rutgers University CounterACT Research Center of Excellence
Rutgers University School of Public Health, Piscataway, NJ

 

Research Areas

Dr. Jeffrey D. Laskin is a Distinguished Professor in the School of Public Health at Rutgers University.  He is Director of the Division of Toxicology at the Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute (EOHSI) and is Deputy Director of the Joint Graduate Program in Toxicology at Rutgers University. He is Director of the Rutgers University CounterACT Research Center of Excellence, a major research effort to develop the most promising scientific discoveries that lead to improved medical countermeasures to protect Americans against a chemical attack.

Dr. Laskin received a B.A. in Chemistry and Biology from New York University, NY and a Ph.D. in Experimental Therapeutics from Roswell Park Cancer Institute, SUNY at Buffalo, NY. He was a post-doctoral fellow in the Institute for Cancer Research at the College of Physicians and Surgeons at Columbia University in NY before joining the faculty the Robert Wood Johnson Medical School and the School of Public Health at Rutgers University. Dr. Laskin has served on numerous study sections for the National Institutes of Health and was an invited participant at the National Institutes of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal Disorders Roundtable on Wound Healing. He is a member of the Cancer Institute of New Jersey, the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Rutgers University and is Deputy Director of the Joint Graduate Program in Toxicology at Rutgers University. Dr. Laskin has also served as a member of the corporation of the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, Massachusetts.

Dr. Laskin has served as a reviewer on over 30 journals that deal with pharmacology, toxicology and cancer research. With over 250 peer-reviewed publications, three books, and numerous book chapters and editorials, he has been recognized as one of the most cited scientists in the field of chemical toxicology. His research focuses on mechanisms of chemical-induced skin, lung and liver toxicity. He is an expert in mechanisms of chemical toxicity, phototoxicology and redox chemistry. Dr. Laskin has been continuously funded by the NIH for the last 35 years and has served as PI on numerous RO1’s, as a Program Project PI and as a Center Director. Currently, he is completing research on exposure and health effects of chemical warfare agents and is working to identify countermeasures to sulfur mustard exposure.

Research Highlights

  • Demonstrated that sulfur mustard induces autophagy in the skin
  • Developed models for sulfur mustard-induced skin and lung toxicity
  • Synthesized >100 inhibitors of chemical-induced skin and lung injury
  • Demonstrated that UVB light is an inducer of prostaglandin and leukotriene biosynthetic enzymes

Scholarly Activities

  • Founder, New Jersey Basic and Applied Dermatology Forum
  • NASA, Issues in Advanced Environmental Health and Advanced Food Technology
  • NIH grant reviewer
  • Member, Cancer Institute of New Jersey
  • Member, NJ Department of Homeland Security Preparedness College
  • Executive Committee, NJ Universities Homeland Security Research Consortium
  • Executive Committee, University Center for Disaster Preparedness and Emergency Response
  • Director, Rutgers University CounterACT Research Center of Excellence

Recent Publications

  1. Smith, LC, Abramova, H, Vayas, K, Rodriguez, J, Gelfand-Titiyevksiy, B, Roepke, T, Laskin, JD, Gow, AJ, Laskin, DL. Transcriptional profiling of lung macrophages following ozone exposure in mice identifies signaling pathways regulating immunometabolic activation. Toxicol Sci. 2024; :. doi: 10.1093/toxsci/kfae081. PubMed PMID:38897669
  2. Radbel, J, Meshanni, JA, Vayas, KN, Le-Hoang, O, Abramova, E, Zhou, P, Joseph, LB, Laskin, JD, Gow, AJ, Laskin, DL et al.. Effects of ozone exposure on lung injury, inflammation, and oxidative stress in a murine model of non-pneumonic endotoxemia. Toxicol Sci. 2024; :. doi: 10.1093/toxsci/kfae062. PubMed PMID:38749002
  3. Bellomo, A, Herbert, J, Kudlak, MJ, Laskin, JD, Gow, AJ, Laskin, DL. Identification of early events in nitrogen mustard pulmonary toxicity that are independent of infiltrating inflammatory cells using precision cut lung slices. Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 2024;486 :116941. doi: 10.1016/j.taap.2024.116941. PubMed PMID:38677601
  4. Roldan, TL, Li, S, Guillon, C, Heindel, ND, Laskin, JD, Lee, IH, Gao, D, Sinko, PJ. Optimizing Nanosuspension Drug Release and Wound Healing Using a Design of Experiments Approach: Improving the Drug Delivery Potential of NDH-4338 for Treating Chemical Burns. Pharmaceutics. 2024;16 (4):. doi: 10.3390/pharmaceutics16040471. PubMed PMID:38675132 PubMed Central PMC11053863
  5. Malaviya, R, Meshanni, JA, Sunil, VR, Venosa, A, Guo, C, Abramova, EV, Vayas, KN, Jiang, C, Cervelli, JA, Gow, AJ et al.. Role of macrophage bioenergetics in N-acetylcysteine-mediated mitigation of lung injury and oxidative stress induced by nitrogen mustard. Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 2024;485 :116908. doi: 10.1016/j.taap.2024.116908. PubMed PMID:38513841
  6. Laskin, JD, Ozkuyumcu, K, Zhou, P, Croutch, CR, Heck, DE, Laskin, DL, Joseph, LB. Skin Models Used to Define Mechanisms of Action of Sulfur Mustard. Disaster Med Public Health Prep. 2023;17 :e551. doi: 10.1017/dmp.2023.177. PubMed PMID:37849329
  7. Malaviya, R, Laskin, JD, Businaro, R, Laskin, DL. Targeting Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha to Mitigate Lung Injury Induced by Mustard Vesicants and Radiation. Disaster Med Public Health Prep. 2023;17 :e553. doi: 10.1017/dmp.2023.178. PubMed PMID:37848400 PubMed Central PMC10841250
  8. Smith, LC, Gow, AJ, Abramova, E, Vayas, K, Guo, C, Noto, J, Lyman, J, Rodriquez, J, Gelfand-Titiyevskiy, B, Malcolm, C et al.. Role of PPARγ in dyslipidemia and altered pulmonary functioning in mice following ozone exposure. Toxicol Sci. 2023;194 (1):109-119. doi: 10.1093/toxsci/kfad048. PubMed PMID:37202362 PubMed Central PMC10306402
  9. Meshanni, JA, Lee, JM, Vayas, KN, Sun, R, Jiang, C, Guo, GL, Gow, AJ, Laskin, JD, Laskin, DL. Suppression of Lung Oxidative Stress, Inflammation, and Fibrosis following Nitrogen Mustard Exposure by the Selective Farnesoid X Receptor Agonist Obeticholic Acid. J Pharmacol Exp Ther. 2024;388 (2):586-595. doi: 10.1124/jpet.123.001557. PubMed PMID:37188530 PubMed Central PMC10801770
  10. Roldan, TL, Li, S, Laskin, JD, Gao, D, Sinko, PJ. Depilatory double-disc mouse model for evaluation of vesicant dermal injury pharmacotherapy countermeasures. Animal Model Exp Med. 2023;6 (1):57-65. doi: 10.1002/ame2.12304. PubMed PMID:36872306 PubMed Central PMC9986227
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Photo of Robert Laumbach M.D., M.P.H., C.I.H.
Robert Laumbach, M.D., M.P.H., C.I.H.
Associate Professor Rutgers University – School of Public HealthEOHSI – Clinical Research and Occupational Medicine

Research Areas
Current research interests are focused on two areas: 1) the interactive effects of exposure to multiple air pollutants and psychosocial stressors, and their cumulative impact on urban disparities in asthma, heart disease and cancer and 2) biological mechanisms underlying the effects of diesel exhaust and other air pollutants on pulmonary and cardiovascular disease. Approaches include community-based participatory research, controlled exposure studies, and semi-controlled “real-world” environmental exposure studies.

Research Highlights

  • Using controlled exposure to study interactions between exposure to diesel exhaust and psychological stress, we demonstrated that diesel exhaust can cause systemic “sickness response symptoms” in young healthy adults
  • Using controlled exposure, we demonstrated that 1-aminopyrene may be a useful, specific biomarker for exposure to diesel exhaust.
  • A simulated commuter car ride caused changes in cardiovascular function among volunteers with diabetes, measured as a decrease in heart rate variability at 24 hours after the ride
  • Exposure to plume of dust and smoke from the 9/11 World Trade Center disaster was not associated with increased respiratory symptoms outside of the lower Manhattan area

Scholarly Activities

  • Development of collaborative relationships with stakeholders interested in applying scientific principles and knowledge to mitigate the environmental health problems and injustices in urban communities and communities adjacent to seaports in New Jersey.
  • Promotion of science in public health policy in New Jersey through service on the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection Science Advisory Board and New Jersey Clean Air Council.

Recent Publications

  1. Ayappa, I, Laumbach, R, Black, K, Weintraub, M, Agarwala, P, Twumasi, A, Sanders, H, Udasin, I, Harrison, D, de la Hoz, RE et al.. Nasal resistance and inflammation: mechanisms for obstructive sleep apnea from chronic rhinosinusitis. J Clin Sleep Med. 2024; :. doi: 10.5664/jcsm.11216. PubMed PMID:38888597
  2. Lu, FT, Laumbach, RJ, Legard, A, Myers, NT, Black, KG, Ohman-Strickland, P, Alimokhtari, S, de Resende, A, Calderón, L, Mainelis, G et al.. Real-World Effectiveness of Portable Air Cleaners in Reducing Home Particulate Matter Concentrations. Aerosol Air Qual Res. 2024;24 (1):. doi: 10.4209/aaqr.230202. PubMed PMID:38618024 PubMed Central PMC11014421
  3. Gholizadeh, A, Black, K, Kipen, H, Laumbach, R, Gow, A, Weisel, C, Javanmard, M. Detection of respiratory inflammation biomarkers in non-processed exhaled breath condensate samples using reduced graphene oxide. RSC Adv. 2022;12 (55):35627-35638. doi: 10.1039/d2ra05764f. PubMed PMID:36545081 PubMed Central PMC9745889
  4. Myers, NT, Laumbach, RJ, Black, KG, Ohman-Strickland, P, Alimokhtari, S, Legard, A, De Resende, A, Calderón, L, Lu, FT, Mainelis, G et al.. Portable air cleaners and residential exposure to SARS-CoV-2 aerosols: A real-world study. Indoor Air. 2022;32 (4):e13029. doi: 10.1111/ina.13029. PubMed PMID:35481935 PubMed Central PMC9111720
  5. Laumbach, RJ, Cromar, KR. Personal Interventions to Reduce Exposure to Outdoor Air Pollution. Annu Rev Public Health. 2022;43 :293-309. doi: 10.1146/annurev-publhealth-052120-103607. PubMed PMID:34936825
  6. Laumbach, RJ, Mainelis, G, Black, KG, Myers, NT, Ohman-Strickland, P, Alimokhtari, S, Hastings, S, Legard, A, de Resende, A, Calderón, L et al.. Presence of SARS-CoV-2 Aerosol in Residences of Adults with COVID-19. Ann Am Thorac Soc. 2022;19 (2):338-341. doi: 10.1513/AnnalsATS.202107-847RL. PubMed PMID:34762562 PubMed Central PMC8867362
  7. Sastry, J, Agawane, S, Rajan, M, Black, K, Laumbach, R, Ramagopal, M. The effect of the indoor environment on wheeze- and sleep-related symptoms in young Indian children. Lung India. 2021;38 (4):307-313. doi: 10.4103/lungindia.lungindia_120_20. PubMed PMID:34259167 PubMed Central PMC8272434
  8. Jan, I, Chen, K, Sayan, M, Uprety, P, Laumbach, RJ, Ennis, RD, Haffty, BG. Prevalence of Surface Contamination With SARS-CoV-2 in a Radiation Oncology Clinic. JAMA Oncol. 2020;6 (10):1632-1634. doi: 10.1001/jamaoncol.2020.3552. PubMed PMID:32852509 PubMed Central PMC7453342
  9. Mariduena, J, Ramagopal, M, Hiatt, M, Chandra, S, Laumbach, R, Hegyi, T. Vascular endothelial growth factor levels and bronchopulmonary dysplasia in preterm infants. J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med. 2022;35 (8):1517-1522. doi: 10.1080/14767058.2020.1760826. PubMed PMID:32366142
  10. Laumbach, RJ. Clearing the Air on Personal Interventions to Reduce Exposure to Wildfire Smoke. Ann Am Thorac Soc. 2019;16 (7):815-818. doi: 10.1513/AnnalsATS.201812-894PS. PubMed PMID:31145636 PubMed Central PMC6600837
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Photo of Jeehiun “Katherine” Lee Ph.D.
Jeehiun “Katherine” Lee, Ph.D.
Professor Rutgers UniversityEOHSI – Toxicology

Research Areas

Our laboratory is multi-disciplinary, with projects that range from organic to biological to analytical. Recent projects include: (i) exploring how damaged DNA differs from normal DNA. Mutated bases are linked to carcinogenesis and cell death and it is therefore important to understand how these damaged bases differ from normal bases. In particular, we are interested in how the damaged bases are identified and excised by enzymes; (ii) identification of small RNAs in cell lysates (collaborative project); (iii) studying the properties of silanols, particularly acidity, to characterize their potential as catalysts (collaborative project); (iv) examining the properties and reactivities of N-heterocyclic carbenes, which are a “hot” topic nowadays due to their versatility (as organometallic ligands, organocatalysts, components in environmentally friendly solvents). Our methods include traditional organic tools (including synthesis) as well as spectroscopy (mass spectrometry, UV absorbance, NMR), and computational chemistry.

Recent Publications

  1. Zhang, L, Ding, X, Kratka, CR, Levine, A, Lee, JK. Gas Phase Experimental and Computational Studies of AlkB Substrates: Intrinsic Properties and Biological Implications. J Org Chem. 2023;88 (18):13115-13124. doi: 10.1021/acs.joc.3c01335. PubMed PMID:37651719
  2. Zhang, L, Kiruba, GSM, Lee, JK. Gas-Phase Studies of Hypoxanthine-Guanine-(Xanthine) Phosphoribosyltransferase (HG(X)PRT) Substrates. J Org Chem. 2023;88 (11):6816-6826. doi: 10.1021/acs.joc.3c00115. PubMed PMID:37220241
  3. Lotsof, ER, Krajewski, AE, Anderson-Steele, B, Rogers, J, Zhang, L, Yeo, J, Conlon, SG, Manlove, AH, Lee, JK, David, SS et al.. NEIL1 Recoding due to RNA Editing Impacts Lesion-Specific Recognition and Excision. J Am Chem Soc. 2022;144 (32):14578-14589. doi: 10.1021/jacs.2c03625. PubMed PMID:35917336 PubMed Central PMC10231864
  4. Hinz, DJ, Zhang, L, Lee, JK. Mass spectrometry in organic and bio-organic catalysis: Using thermochemical properties to lend insight into mechanism. Mass Spectrom Rev. 2023;42 (5):1965-1983. doi: 10.1002/mas.21797. PubMed PMID:35899315
  5. Krajewski, AE, Lee, JK. Nucleophilicity and Electrophilicity in the Gas Phase: Silane Hydricity. J Org Chem. 2022;87 (3):1840-1849. doi: 10.1021/acs.joc.1c02763. PubMed PMID:35044778
  6. Krajewski, AE, Lee, JK. Gas-Phase Experimental and Computational Studies of 5-Halouracils: Intrinsic Properties and Biological Implications. J Org Chem. 2021;86 (9):6361-6370. doi: 10.1021/acs.joc.1c00183. PubMed PMID:33891415
  7. Majumdar, C, McKibbin, PL, Krajewski, AE, Manlove, AH, Lee, JK, David, SS. Unique Hydrogen Bonding of Adenine with the Oxidatively Damaged Base 8-Oxoguanine Enables Specific Recognition and Repair by DNA Glycosylase MutY. J Am Chem Soc. 2020;142 (48):20340-20350. doi: 10.1021/jacs.0c06767. PubMed PMID:33202125 PubMed Central PMC9187209
  8. Xu, J, Krajewski, AE, Niu, Y, Kiruba, GSM, Lee, JK. Kinetic hydricity of silane hydrides in the gas phase. Chem Sci. 2019;10 (34):8002-8008. doi: 10.1039/c9sc02118c. PubMed PMID:31853355 PubMed Central PMC6837013
  9. Wang, N, Lee, JK. Gas-Phase and Ionic Liquid Experimental and Computational Studies of Imidazole Acidity and Carbon Dioxide Capture. J Org Chem. 2019;84 (22):14593-14601. doi: 10.1021/acs.joc.9b02193. PubMed PMID:31647232
  10. Xu, J, Mieres-Perez, J, Sanchez-Garcia, E, Lee, JK. Gas-Phase Deprotonation of Benzhydryl Cations: Carbene Basicity, Multiplicity, and Rearrangements. J Org Chem. 2019;84 (12):7685-7693. doi: 10.1021/acs.joc.9b00496. PubMed PMID:31008604
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Alicia Legard
Technical Assistamt Rutgers UniversityEOHSI- Clinical Research and Occupational Medicine
Photo of Paul Lehrer Ph.D.
Paul Lehrer, Ph.D.
Rutgers UniversityEOHSI – Clinical Research and Occupational Medicine

Research Areas

  • Heart rate variability biofeedback as a treatment for asthma: a complement or alternative to steroids?
  • Psychological treatment of comorbid asthma and panic disorder
  • Heart rate variability biofeedback as a treatment for chronic drug and alcohol abuse
  • Psychophysiological correlates of emotional stimulation: relationship to chronic mood states, and tendencies to substance abuse
  • Measurement of adaptability and health: modeling control systems, oscillations as reflecting system stability
  • Exploring psychophysiological treatment approaches for patients with multiple unexplained physical symptoms
  • Psychophysiological factors in human optimal performance

Research Highlights

  • Found that heart rate variability biofeedback is 100% effective in preventing asthma exacerbations, while allowing lower doses of steroids, producing better pulmonary function, and fewer symptoms
  • Found that heart rate variability biofeedback improves symptomatology and depression among individuals with multiple unexplained physical symptoms
  • Found that people with negative mood states tend to have a greater thoracic than abdominal component in breathing
  • Developed a cognitive behavioral treatment that effectively helps people with comorbid asthma and panic disorder, improving both diseases, allowing less use of albuterol
  • Found that airplane pilots show patterns of hyperventilation and psychophysiological hyperarousal during difficult flight tasks
  • Found that sighing plays an important role in regulation of the respiratory system
  • Stimulation of the baroreflexes by heart rate variability biofeedback: a method for increasing autonomic stability and homeostasisa

Scholarly Activities

  • Associate editor, Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback and International Journal of Stress Management
  • Recent keynote talks to various scholarly organizations, including:
    • Association for Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback
    • German Biofeedback Society
    • Baltic Area Biofeedback Society
    • International Society for Advancement of Respiratory Psychophysiology
    • American Society for Clinical Hypnosis
  • Member of the Research Committee, UMDNJ, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School
  • President, USA branch of the International stress Management Association
  • Past president of Association for Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback and the International Association for Advancement of Respiratory Psychophysiology
  • Found that heart rate variability biofeedback decreases the autonomic downregulation produced by exposure to inflammatory cytokines

Recent Publications

  1. Aschbacher, K, Mather, M, Lehrer, P, Gevirtz, R, Epel, E, Peiper, NC. Real-time heart rate variability biofeedback amplitude during a large-scale digital mental health intervention differed by age, gender, and mental and physical health. Psychophysiology. 2024;61 (6):e14533. doi: 10.1111/psyp.14533. PubMed PMID:38454612
  2. Yoo, HJ, Nashiro, K, Dutt, S, Min, J, Cho, C, Thayer, JF, Lehrer, P, Chang, C, Mather, M. Daily biofeedback to modulate heart rate oscillations affects structural volume in hippocampal subregions targeted by the locus coeruleus in older adults but not younger adults. Neurobiol Aging. 2023;132 :85-99. doi: 10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2023.08.010. PubMed PMID:37769491 PubMed Central PMC10840698
  3. Yoo, HJ, Nashiro, K, Dutt, S, Min, J, Cho, C, Thayer, JF, Lehrer, P, Chang, C, Mather, M. Daily biofeedback to modulate heart rate oscillations affects structural volume in hippocampal subregions targeted by the locus coeruleus in older adults but not younger adults. medRxiv. 2023; :. doi: 10.1101/2023.03.02.23286715. PubMed PMID:37745356 PubMed Central PMC10516053
  4. Bachman, SL, Cole, S, Yoo, HJ, Nashiro, K, Min, J, Mercer, N, Nasseri, P, Thayer, JF, Lehrer, P, Mather, M et al.. Daily heart rate variability biofeedback training decreases locus coeruleus MRI contrast in younger adults in a randomized clinical trial. Int J Psychophysiol. 2023;193 :112241. doi: 10.1016/j.ijpsycho.2023.08.014. PubMed PMID:37647944 PubMed Central PMC10591988
  5. Yoo, HJ, Nashiro, K, Min, J, Cho, C, Mercer, N, Bachman, SL, Nasseri, P, Dutt, S, Porat, S, Choi, P et al.. Multimodal neuroimaging data from a 5-week heart rate variability biofeedback randomized clinical trial. Sci Data. 2023;10 (1):503. doi: 10.1038/s41597-023-02396-5. PubMed PMID:37516756 PubMed Central PMC10387077
  6. Bates, ME, Eddie, D, Lehrer, PM, Nolan, RP, Siepmann, M. Editorial: Integrated cardiovascular and neural system processes as potential mechanisms of behavior change. Front Psychiatry. 2023;14 :1175691. doi: 10.3389/fpsyt.2023.1175691. PubMed PMID:37032946 PubMed Central PMC10074486
  7. Cho, C, Yoo, HJ, Min, J, Nashiro, K, Thayer, JF, Lehrer, PM, Mather, M. Changes in Medial Prefrontal Cortex Mediate Effects of Heart Rate Variability Biofeedback on Positive Emotional Memory Biases. Appl Psychophysiol Biofeedback. 2023;48 (2):135-147. doi: 10.1007/s10484-023-09579-1. PubMed PMID:36658380 PubMed Central PMC10195741
  8. Nashiro, K, Yoo, HJ, Cho, C, Min, J, Feng, T, Nasseri, P, Bachman, SL, Lehrer, P, Thayer, JF, Mather, M et al.. Correction: Effects of a Randomised Trial of 5-Week Heart Rate Variability Biofeedback Intervention on Cognitive Function: Possible Benefits for Inhibitory Control. Appl Psychophysiol Biofeedback. 2023;48 (1):49. doi: 10.1007/s10484-022-09563-1. PubMed PMID:36152080 PubMed Central PMC10074510
  9. Nashiro, K, Min, J, Yoo, HJ, Cho, C, Bachman, SL, Dutt, S, Thayer, JF, Lehrer, PM, Feng, T, Mercer, N et al.. Increasing coordination and responsivity of emotion-related brain regions with a heart rate variability biofeedback randomized trial. Cogn Affect Behav Neurosci. 2023;23 (1):66-83. doi: 10.3758/s13415-022-01032-w. PubMed PMID:36109422 PubMed Central PMC9931635
  10. Yoo, HJ, Nashiro, K, Min, J, Cho, C, Bachman, SL, Nasseri, P, Porat, S, Dutt, S, Grigoryan, V, Choi, P et al.. Heart rate variability (HRV) changes and cortical volume changes in a randomized trial of five weeks of daily HRV biofeedback in younger and older adults. Int J Psychophysiol. 2022;181 :50-63. doi: 10.1016/j.ijpsycho.2022.08.006. PubMed PMID:36030986 PubMed Central PMC11195601
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Karen Lin
Rutgers UniversityEOHSI – Clinical Research and Occupational Medicine
Ruth Lin
Physician Rutgers UniversityEOHSI- Clinical Research and Occupational Medicine
Photo of Peter Lobel Ph.D.
Peter Lobel, Ph.D.
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular BiologyRutgers Behavioral Health Systems
Photo of Shou-En Lu Ph.D.
Shou-En Lu, Ph.D.
Associate Professor Rutgers University – School of Public HealthEOHSI – Environmental and Population Health Bio-Sciences

Recent Publications

  1. Ayappa, I, Laumbach, R, Black, K, Weintraub, M, Agarwala, P, Twumasi, A, Sanders, H, Udasin, I, Harrison, D, de la Hoz, RE et al.. Nasal resistance and inflammation: mechanisms for obstructive sleep apnea from chronic rhinosinusitis. J Clin Sleep Med. 2024; :. doi: 10.5664/jcsm.11216. PubMed PMID:38888597
  2. Sunderram, J, Legard, A, De Resende, A, Black, K, Udasin, IG, Lu, SE, Romero Castillo, H, Ravi, SS, Mullins, AE, de la Hoz, RE et al.. Lack of association of impaired upper airway sensation with the presence or absence of obstructive sleep apnoea or chronic rhinosinusitis in World Trade Center responders. Occup Environ Med. 2024; :. doi: 10.1136/oemed-2023-109262. PubMed PMID:38871449
  3. Chen, Y, Lin, Y, Lu, SE, Shih, WJ, Quan, H. Two-stage stratified designs with survival outcomes and adjustment for misclassification in predictive biomarkers. Stat Med. 2024;43 (10):1883-1904. doi: 10.1002/sim.10048. PubMed PMID:38634277 PubMed Central PMC11068307
  4. Cooperman, NA, Lu, SE, Garland, EL. Pain Scores as Secondary Outcomes-Opioid Reduction Studies-Reply. JAMA Psychiatry. 2024; :. doi: 10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2024.0522. PubMed PMID:38630456
  5. An, J, McDougall, J, Lin, Y, Lu, SE, Walters, ST, Heidt, E, Stroup, A, Paddock, L, Grumet, S, Toppmeyer, D et al.. Randomized trial promoting cancer genetic risk assessment when genetic counseling cost removed: 1-year follow-up. JNCI Cancer Spectr. 2024;8 (2):. doi: 10.1093/jncics/pkae018. PubMed PMID:38490263 PubMed Central PMC11006111
  6. Portal, D, Lu, SE, Piperdi, H, Jabbour, SK, Reyhan, M. Adaptive Lung Radiation Therapy in the Era of Immunotherapy: A Single-Center Retrospective Study. Adv Radiat Oncol. 2024;9 (1):101315. doi: 10.1016/j.adro.2023.101315. PubMed PMID:38260217 PubMed Central PMC10801661
  7. Lu, SE, Kim, S, Cheng, JQ, Lin, C, Goyal, S, Jabbour, SK. Fixed and random effect selections in generalized linear mixed models. Stat Methods Med Res. 2024;33 (1):3-23. doi: 10.1177/09622802231221201. PubMed PMID:38155567
  8. Manne, S, Wu, Y, Buller, D, Heckman, C, Devine, K, Frederick, S, Solleder, J, Schaefer, A, Lu, SE. The Effects of a Parent-Focused Social Media Intervention on Child Sun Safety: Pilot and Feasibility Study. JMIR Form Res. 2023;7 :e48402. doi: 10.2196/48402. PubMed PMID:38064250 PubMed Central PMC10746961
  9. Cooperman, NA, Lu, SE, Hanley, AW, Puvananayagam, T, Dooley-Budsock, P, Kline, A, Garland, EL. Telehealth Mindfulness-Oriented Recovery Enhancement vs Usual Care in Individuals With Opioid Use Disorder and Pain: A Randomized Clinical Trial. JAMA Psychiatry. 2024;81 (4):338-346. doi: 10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2023.5138. PubMed PMID:38061786 PubMed Central PMC10704342
  10. Fredericks-Younger, J, Greenberg, P, Andrews, T, Matheson, PB, Desjardins, PJ, Lu, SE, Feldman, CA. Leveraging the functionality of Research Electronic Data Capture (REDCap) to enhance data collection and quality in the Opioid Analgesic Reduction Study. Clin Trials. 2024;21 (3):381-389. doi: 10.1177/17407745231212190. PubMed PMID:37961913 PubMed Central PMC11090991
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Photo of Kevin Lyons Ph.D.
Kevin Lyons, Ph.D.
Associate Professor – Director, Rutgers Center for Local Supply Chain Resiliency Rutgers UniversityEOHSI – Global Environmental Health Division
Photo of Gediminas “Gedi” Mainelis Ph.D.
Gediminas “Gedi” Mainelis, Ph.D.
Professor Rutgers University, School of Environmental and Biological SciencesEOHSI – Environmental and Population Health Bio-Sciences

Research Areas

  • Development of aerosol/bioaerosol sampling, control, and generation methods
  • Investigation of aerosol and bioaerosol monitors’ performance
  • Integration of bioaerosol sampling tools with advanced microbiological analysis techniques Aerosol exposure assessment
    Indoor air quality
  • Exposure and health effects of nanoparticles

Research Highlights

  • Investigated the potential release of particles from nanotechnology-based consumer products and showed that their use could result in inhalation exposures to nanoparticles and their agglomerates
  • Developed a novel electrostatics-based collector for biological aerosols where airborne particles could be captured into very small amounts of liquid (5-40 microliters) thus allowing to measure low concentrations of airborne microorganisms.
  • Investigated indoor exposures of young children to airborne contaminants using a novel robotic sampling platform. The research shows that the current exposure assessment methods using stationary samplers may underestimate exposures by a factor of 3.

Scholarly Activities

  • Co-Chair of the “Health-Related Aerosol Working Group” of the American Association for Aerosol Research for 2010-2011.
  • Member, Aerosol Technology Committee, American Industrial Hygiene Association.
  • Member, Stakeholders’ Panel on Agent Detection Assays (SPADA), organized by AOAC International, contracted by the Department of Homeland Security’s Chemical/Biological Research and Development Section (CBRDS)
  • Reviewer for scholarly journals

Recent Publications

  1. Lu, FT, Laumbach, RJ, Legard, A, Myers, NT, Black, KG, Ohman-Strickland, P, Alimokhtari, S, de Resende, A, Calderón, L, Mainelis, G et al.. Real-World Effectiveness of Portable Air Cleaners in Reducing Home Particulate Matter Concentrations. Aerosol Air Qual Res. 2024;24 (1):. doi: 10.4209/aaqr.230202. PubMed PMID:38618024 PubMed Central PMC11014421
  2. He, R, McAtee, J, Mainelis, G. Potential exposure of adults and children to particles from resuspended nano-enabled consumer sprays. Sci Total Environ. 2024;924 :171459. doi: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2024.171459. PubMed PMID:38438041
  3. Desai, G, Ramachandran, G, Goldman, E, Esposito, W, Galione, A, Lal, A, Choueiri, TK, Fay, A, Jordan, W, Schaffner, DW et al.. Efficacy of Grignard Pure to Inactivate Airborne Phage MS2, a Common SARS-CoV-2 Surrogate. Environ Sci Technol. 2023;57 (10):4231-4240. doi: 10.1021/acs.est.2c08632. PubMed PMID:36853925 PubMed Central PMC10001433
  4. He, R, Zhang, J, Mainelis, G. Resuspension of particles deposited by nano-enabled consumer sprays: The role of product type, flooring material, and resuspension force. Indoor Air. 2022;32 (11):e13157. doi: 10.1111/ina.13157. PubMed PMID:36437654 PubMed Central PMC9827835
  5. Dillon, KP, Krumins, V, Deshpande, A, Kerkhof, LJ, Mainelis, G, Fennell, DE. Characterization and DNA Stable-Isotope Probing of Methanotrophic Bioaerosols. Microbiol Spectr. 2022;10 (6):e0342122. doi: 10.1128/spectrum.03421-22. PubMed PMID:36409096 PubMed Central PMC9769660
  6. Manibusan, S, Mainelis, G. Passive Bioaerosol Samplers: A Complementary Tool for Bioaerosol Research. A Review. J Aerosol Sci. 2022;163 :. doi: 10.1016/j.jaerosci.2022.105992. PubMed PMID:36386279 PubMed Central PMC9648171
  7. Goldman, E, Choueiri, TK, Mainelis, G, Ramachandran, G, Schaffner, DW. Triethylene Glycol Can Be Predeployed as a Safe Virus-Killing Indoor Air Treatment. J Infect Dis. 2022;226 (11):2040-2041. doi: 10.1093/infdis/jiac394. PubMed PMID:36177834
  8. Myers, NT, Laumbach, RJ, Black, KG, Ohman-Strickland, P, Alimokhtari, S, Legard, A, De Resende, A, Calderón, L, Lu, FT, Mainelis, G et al.. Portable air cleaners and residential exposure to SARS-CoV-2 aerosols: A real-world study. Indoor Air. 2022;32 (4):e13029. doi: 10.1111/ina.13029. PubMed PMID:35481935 PubMed Central PMC9111720
  9. Grogan, SNCM, Han, TT, Mainelis, G. Development and initial testing of an active low-power, ferroelectric film-based bioaerosol sampler. Aerosol Sci Technol. 2022;56 (12):1132-1145. doi: 10.1080/02786826.2022.2128985. PubMed PMID:37168518 PubMed Central PMC10168024
  10. Laumbach, RJ, Mainelis, G, Black, KG, Myers, NT, Ohman-Strickland, P, Alimokhtari, S, Hastings, S, Legard, A, de Resende, A, Calderón, L et al.. Presence of SARS-CoV-2 Aerosol in Residences of Adults with COVID-19. Ann Am Thorac Soc. 2022;19 (2):338-341. doi: 10.1513/AnnalsATS.202107-847RL. PubMed PMID:34762562 PubMed Central PMC8867362
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Photo of Elizabeth G Marshall Ph.D.
Elizabeth G Marshall, Ph.D.
EOHSI – Environmental and Population Health Bio-Sciences
Photo of Bindhu Mathew
Bindhu Mathew
Nurse Case Manager Rutgers UniversityEOHSI-Clinical Research and Occupational Medicine
Naureen Memon, M.D.
Fellow Rutgers UniversityEOHSI – Toxicology
Photo of Zhongyuan “Wheat” Mi M.P.H.
Zhongyuan “Wheat” Mi, M.P.H.
Rutgers UniversityEOHSI – Environmental and Population Health Bio-Sciences
Photo of Joshua Miller Ph.D.
Joshua Miller, Ph.D.
Rutgers UniversitySchool of Environmental and Biological Sciences
Photo of Tamara Minko Ph.D.
Tamara Minko, Ph.D.
Distinguished Professor – Chair, Department of Pharmaceutics Rutgers University – Ernest Mario School of PharmacyEOHSI – Toxicology

Dr. Tamara Minko is a Professor II and Chair of the Department of Pharmaceutics at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey. She is also a member of the Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute. Her current research interests include drug delivery; biopharmaceutics; nanotechnology; molecular targeting; antisense oligonucleotides, siRNA and peptide delivery; mechanisms of multidrug resistance; intracellular fate and molecular mechanisms of action of anticancer drugs; bioimaging; macromolecular therapeutics; preclinical evaluation of new therapeutics; modulation of cell death mechanisms during hypoxia.

Professor Minko is author and co-author of more than 400 publications (peer-reviewed papers, books and textbook chapters, conference proceedings, patents). Many of her papers are well cited and published in prestigious journals with high impact factors including PNAS, Nature Nanotechnology, Cancer Research, Clinical Cancer Research, Advanced Drug Delivery Review, Journal of Controlled Release, etc. Dr. Minko is a Fellow of the American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists, elected member of the Board of Scientific Advisors of the Controlled Release Society, recipient of numerous awards, Editor of Pharmaceutical Research, member of editorial board of several scientific journals and a member of Study Sections at NIH, DOD, American Heart Association and other national and international review panels. Her research is supported by grants from NIH, NSF, DOD and other national and international sources.

Research Areas

Biopharmaceutics; nanotechnology; molecular targeting; antisense oligonucleotides, siRNA and peptide delivery; mechanisms of multidrug resistance; intracellular fate and molecular mechanisms of action of anticancer drugs; bioimaging; macromolecular therapeutics; preclinical evaluation of new therapeutics; modulation of cell death mechanisms during hypoxia.

Ongoing/Recent Research Support

  • 07/01/10 – 05/31/15. NIH/NCI R01CA138533, T. Minko – Principal Investigator. Multifunctional Nanotherapeutics for Cancer Treatment and Imaging.
  • 04/01/03 – 07/31/12. NIH/NCI R01 CA100098, T. Minko – Principal Investigator, Targeted Proapoptotic Anticancer Drug Delivery System.
  • 04/07/06 – 02/28/12. NIH/NCI R01 CA111766, T. Minko – Principal Investigator. Molecular Targeting of Drug Delivery System to Cancer.
  • 09/01/10 – 07/31/15. U54CA151881, T. Minko – Principal Investigator, Combination Nanotherapeutic Strategies to Overcome Tumor Drug Resistance.
  • 07/01/09 – 06/30/12. NIH/NIBIB R01 EB008278, T. Minko – Co-Investigator. Efficient Cellular Delivery of Oligonucleotides. (Principal Investigator – Dr. C. M. Roth, Department of Chemical & Biochemical Engineering, Rutgers University).
  • 12/01/09 – 11/30/12. National Science Foundation CBET 0933966, T. Minko – Co-Principal Investigator. Novel Self Assembly of siRNA for Efficient and Safe Delivery. (Principal Investigator – Dr. H. He, Department of Chemistry, Newark, Rutgers University).
  • Ongoing Research Support:
  • 07/01/10 – 05/31/15. NIH/NCI R01CA138533, T. Minko – Principal Investigator. Multifunctional Nanotherapeutics for Cancer Treatment and Imaging.
  • 10/01/09 – 09/31/11. NIH/NCI (ARRA) R01 CA100098, T. Minko – Principal Investigator, Targeted Proapoptotic Anticancer Drug Delivery System.
  • 04/07/06 – 02/28/12. NIH/NCI R01 CA111766, T. Minko – Principal Investigator. Molecular targeting of drug delivery system to cancer.
  • 09/01/10 – 07/31/15. U54CA151881, T. Minko – Principal Investigator, Combination nanotherapeutic strategies to overcome tumor drug resistance.
  • 07/01/09 – 06/30/11. NIH/NIBIB R01 EB008278, T. Minko – Co-Investigator. Efficient Cellular Delivery of Oligonucleotides. (Principal Investigator – Dr. C. M. Roth, Department of Chemical & Biochemical Engineering, Rutgers University).
  • 09/15/06 – 06/30/11. NIH/NIBIB R01 EB007049, T. Minko – Co- Principal Investigator. Carrier Shape Matters: Filomicelles, Long-circulation, and the EPR effect. (Principal Investigator – Dr. D. Discher, University of Pennsylvania).
  • 12/01/09 – 11/30/12. National Science Foundation CBET 0933966, T. Minko – Co-Principal Investigator. Novel Self Assembly of siRNA for Efficient and Safe Delivery. (Principal Investigator – Dr. H. He, Department of Chemistry, Newark, Rutgers University).
  • 07/01/10 – 06/30/11. Department of Defense Lung Cancer Research Program W81XWH-10-1-0347, T. Minko Co-Investigator (Principal Investigator – Dr. O. Taratula, Postdoctoral Research Associate working under the supervision of Dr. Minko). Innovative Strategy for Treatment of Lung Cancer: Inhalatory Co-Delivery of Anticancer drugs and siRNA for Suppression of Cellular Resistance.

Research Highlights

  • Nanotechnology based inhalatory treatment of lung cancer
  • Targeted multifunctional approach for treatment of multidrug resistant cancer and prevention of metastases
  • Prevention of cellular hypoxic damage by the suppression of Jun N-Terminal Kinase 1

Scholarly Activities

  • 2010 Member (Elected), Board of Scientific Advisors, Controlled Release Society
  • 2009 Fellow of the American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists (AAPS)
  • 2008, 2010, 2011 Controlled Release Society Outstanding Pharmaceutical Paper Award
  • 1998 The Jorge Heller Journal of Controlled Release/Controlled Release Society Outstanding Paper Award

Recent Publications

  1. Gu, X, Majumder, J, Taratula, O, Kuzmov, A, Garbuzenko, O, Pogrebnyak, N, Minko, T. Nanotechnology-Based Strategy for Enhancing Therapeutic Efficacy in Pancreatic Cancer: Receptor-Targeted Drug Delivery by Somatostatin Analog. Int J Mol Sci. 2024;25 (10):. doi: 10.3390/ijms25105545. PubMed PMID:38791582 PubMed Central PMC11122428
  2. Gu, X, Minko, T. Targeted Nanoparticle-Based Diagnostic and Treatment Options for Pancreatic Cancer. Cancers (Basel). 2024;16 (8):. doi: 10.3390/cancers16081589. PubMed PMID:38672671 PubMed Central PMC11048786
  3. Garbuzenko, OB, Sapiezynski, J, Girda, E, Rodriguez-Rodriguez, L, Minko, T. Personalized Versus Precision Nanomedicine for Treatment of Ovarian Cancer. Small. 2024; :e2307462. doi: 10.1002/smll.202307462. PubMed PMID:38342698
  4. Shen, AM, Malekshah, OM, Pogrebnyak, N, Minko, T. Plant-derived single domain COVID-19 antibodies. J Control Release. 2023;359 :1-11. doi: 10.1016/j.jconrel.2023.05.030. PubMed PMID:37225092 PubMed Central PMC10231691
  5. Gildiz, S, Minko, T. Nanotechnology-Based Nucleic Acid Vaccines for Treatment of Ovarian Cancer. Pharm Res. 2023;40 (1):123-144. doi: 10.1007/s11095-022-03434-4. PubMed PMID:36376606 PubMed Central PMC9663189
  6. Castellano, GM, Zeeshan, S, Garbuzenko, OB, Sabaawy, HE, Malhotra, J, Minko, T, Pine, SR. Inhibition of Mtorc1/2 and DNA-PK via CC-115 Synergizes with Carboplatin and Paclitaxel in Lung Squamous Cell Carcinoma. Mol Cancer Ther. 2022;21 (9):1381-1392. doi: 10.1158/1535-7163.MCT-22-0053. PubMed PMID:35732569 PubMed Central PMC9452486
  7. Lee, D, Minko, T. Nanotherapeutics for Nose-to-Brain Drug Delivery: An Approach to Bypass the Blood Brain Barrier. Pharmaceutics. 2021;13 (12):. doi: 10.3390/pharmaceutics13122049. PubMed PMID:34959331 PubMed Central PMC8704573
  8. Majumder, J, Minko, T. Multifunctional Lipid-Based Nanoparticles for Codelivery of Anticancer Drugs and siRNA for Treatment of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer with Different Level of Resistance and EGFR Mutations. Pharmaceutics. 2021;13 (7):. doi: 10.3390/pharmaceutics13071063. PubMed PMID:34371754 PubMed Central PMC8309189
  9. Rather, GM, Anyanwu, M, Minko, T, Garbuzenko, O, Szekely, Z, Bertino, JR. Anti-Tumor Effects of a Penetratin Peptide Targeting Transcription of E2F-1, 2 and 3a Is Enhanced When Used in Combination with Pemetrexed or Cisplatin. Cancers (Basel). 2021;13 (5):. doi: 10.3390/cancers13050972. PubMed PMID:33652640 PubMed Central PMC7956530
  10. Allenspach, C, Timmins, P, Lumay, G, Holman, J, Minko, T. Loss-in-weight feeding, powder flow and electrostatic evaluation for direct compression hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) to support continuous manufacturing. Int J Pharm. 2021;596 :120259. doi: 10.1016/j.ijpharm.2021.120259. PubMed PMID:33486020
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Kristopher Minsinger, MD
Resident EOHSI-Rutgers UniversityClinical Research and Occupational Medicine
Photo of Dirk F Moore Ph.D.
Dirk F Moore, Ph.D.
Associate Professor Rutgers University, School of Public HealthEOHSI – Environmental and Population Health Bio-Sciences

Recent Publications

  1. Allen, WE, Greendyk, JD, Alexander, HR, Beninato, T, Eskander, MF, Grandhi, MS, In, H, Kennedy, TJ, Langan, RC, Maggi, JC et al.. Racial disparities in rates of invasiveness of resected intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms in the United States. Surgery. 2024;175 (5):1402-1407. doi: 10.1016/j.surg.2024.01.028. PubMed PMID:38423892
  2. Daniel, LC, Venella, KL, Woodard, K, Poliakova, P, Gross, JY, Bercovitz, IN, Moore, D, Barakat, LP, Freedman, JL. Can extending time between vital sign checks improve sleep in hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients? Testing feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary efficacy. Pediatr Blood Cancer. 2024;71 (4):e30832. doi: 10.1002/pbc.30832. PubMed PMID:38197636
  3. Cararo Lopes, E, Sawant, A, Moore, D, Ke, H, Shi, F, Laddha, S, Chen, Y, Sharma, A, Naumann, J, Guo, JY et al.. Integrated metabolic and genetic analysis reveals distinct features of human differentiated thyroid cancer. Clin Transl Med. 2023;13 (6):e1298. doi: 10.1002/ctm2.1298. PubMed PMID:37317665 PubMed Central PMC10267429
  4. Yashar, C, Khan, AJ, Chen, P, Einck, J, Poppe, M, Li, L, Yehia, ZA, Vicini, FA, Moore, D, Arthur, D et al.. Three-Fraction Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation (APBI) Delivered With Interstitial Brachytherapy Is Safe: First Results From the Tri-fraction Radiation Therapy Used to Minimize Patient Hospital Trips (TRIUMPH-T) Trial. Pract Radiat Oncol. 2023;13 (4):314-320. doi: 10.1016/j.prro.2023.03.006. PubMed PMID:37140504
  5. Cararo-Lopes, E, Sawant, A, Moore, D, Ke, H, Shi, F, Laddha, S, Chen, Y, Sharma, A, Naumann, J, Guo, JY et al.. Integrated metabolic and genetic analysis reveals distinct features of primary differentiated thyroid cancer and its metastatic potential in humans. medRxiv. 2023; :. doi: 10.1101/2023.03.09.23287037. PubMed PMID:36945575 PubMed Central PMC10029066
  6. Gulhati, P, Schalck, A, Jiang, S, Shang, X, Wu, CJ, Hou, P, Ruiz, SH, Soto, LS, Parra, E, Ying, H et al.. Targeting T cell checkpoints 41BB and LAG3 and myeloid cell CXCR1/CXCR2 results in antitumor immunity and durable response in pancreatic cancer. Nat Cancer. 2023;4 (1):62-80. doi: 10.1038/s43018-022-00500-z. PubMed PMID:36585453 PubMed Central PMC9925045
  7. Fosko, NK, Gribkova, Y, Krupa, K, Bs, KJ, Moore, D, Chen, C, Potdevin, L, Kumar, S, Eladoumikdachi, F, Kowzun, MJ et al.. The Use of Intraoperative Ultrasound During Breast Conserving Surgery. Clin Breast Cancer. 2023;23 (1):54-59. doi: 10.1016/j.clbc.2022.10.003. PubMed PMID:36319507
  8. Moore, DF, Sleat, DE, Lobel, P. A Method to Estimate the Distribution of Proteins across Multiple Compartments Using Data from Quantitative Proteomics Subcellular Fractionation Experiments. J Proteome Res. 2022;21 (6):1371-1381. doi: 10.1021/acs.jproteome.1c00781. PubMed PMID:35522998
  9. Gazivoda, VP, Kangas-Dick, AW, Greenbaum, AA, Roshal, J, Chen, C, Moore, DF, Langan, RC, Kennedy, TJ, Minerowicz, C, Alexander, HR et al.. Expression of PD-L1 in Patients With Malignant Peritoneal Mesothelioma: A Pilot Study. J Surg Res. 2022;277 :131-137. doi: 10.1016/j.jss.2022.04.005. PubMed PMID:35489218
  10. Dansu, DK, Liang, J, Selcen, I, Zheng, H, Moore, DF, Casaccia, P. PRMT5 Interacting Partners and Substrates in Oligodendrocyte Lineage Cells. Front Cell Neurosci. 2022;16 :820226. doi: 10.3389/fncel.2022.820226. PubMed PMID:35370564 PubMed Central PMC8968030
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Photo of Phyllis Morgan
Phyllis Morgan
Rutgers UniversityEOHSI – Clinical Research and Occupational Medicine
Maria Nagrowski
Rutgers UniversityEOHSI – Clinical Research and Occupational Medicine
Hasan Nezam, MD
Resident EOHSI-Rutgers UniversityClinical Research and Occupational Medicine
Photo of Pamela A Ohman-Strickland Ph.D.
Pamela A Ohman-Strickland, Ph.D.
Associate Professor/Associate Dean Rutgers University, School of Public HealthEOHSI – Environmental and Population Health Bio-Sciences

Research Areas

Dr. Ohman Strickland conducts research into statistical methods to evaluate environmental-health associations. This includes evaluations of such associations when the response is ordinal, non-normal and/or is measured repeated following exposures. She has collaborated extensively as a biostatistician/co-investigator on projects looking at symptom and physiological effects of acute ambient exposures using the controlled environmental facility and other controlled exposure studies as well as studies of health effects of chronic occupational exposures (such as lead). Recent studies and statistical methodology

Scholarly Activities

Reviewer for the following journals:

  • Biometrics
  • Statistics and Probability Letters
  • Annals of Family Medicine
  • Neurotoxicology
  • Journal of Clinical Onocology

Recent Publications

  1. Yang, Z, Black, K, Ohman-Strickland, P, Graber, JM, Kipen, HM, Fang, M, Zarbl, H. Disruption of central and peripheral circadian clocks and circadian controlled estrogen receptor rhythms in night shift nurses in working environments. FASEB J. 2024;38 (11):e23719. doi: 10.1096/fj.202302261RR. PubMed PMID:38837828
  2. Lu, FT, Laumbach, RJ, Legard, A, Myers, NT, Black, KG, Ohman-Strickland, P, Alimokhtari, S, de Resende, A, Calderón, L, Mainelis, G et al.. Real-World Effectiveness of Portable Air Cleaners in Reducing Home Particulate Matter Concentrations. Aerosol Air Qual Res. 2024;24 (1):. doi: 10.4209/aaqr.230202. PubMed PMID:38618024 PubMed Central PMC11014421
  3. Nimmapirat, P, Fiedler, N, Suttiwan, P, Sullivan, MW, Ohman-Strickland, P, Panuwet, P, Barr, DB, Prapamontol, T, Naksen, W, SAWASDEE birth cohort investigative team et al.. Predictors of executive function among 2 year olds from a Thai birth cohort. Infant Behav Dev. 2024;74 :101916. doi: 10.1016/j.infbeh.2023.101916. PubMed PMID:38096613 PubMed Central PMC10947867
  4. Ji, N, Baptista, A, Yu, CH, Cepeda, C, Green, F, Greenberg, M, Mincey, IC, Ohman-Strickland, P, Fiedler, N, Kipen, HM et al.. Traffic-related air pollution, chronic stress, and changes in exhaled nitric oxide and lung function among a panel of children with asthma living in an underresourced community. Sci Total Environ. 2024;912 :168984. doi: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2023.168984. PubMed PMID:38040352
  5. Fadem, SJ, Crabtree, BF, O'Malley, DM, Mikesell, L, Ferrante, JM, Toppmeyer, DL, Ohman-Strickland, PA, Hemler, JR, Howard, J, Bator, A et al.. Adapting and implementing breast cancer follow-up in primary care: protocol for a mixed methods hybrid type 1 effectiveness-implementation cluster randomized study. BMC Prim Care. 2023;24 (1):235. doi: 10.1186/s12875-023-02186-3. PubMed PMID:37946132 PubMed Central PMC10634067
  6. Pearson, J, Gratale, SK, Ganz, O, Erinoso, OA, Ohman-Strickland, P, Wackowski, OA. Longitudinal relationship between relative harm perceptions, beliefs about organic and additive-free tobacco, and cigarette brand switching among Natural American Spirit, Camel and Marlboro cigarette smokers. Tob Control. 2023; :. doi: 10.1136/tc-2023-057933. PubMed PMID:37562949 PubMed Central PMC10858295
  7. Rivera-Núñez, Z, Hansel, M, Capurro, C, Kozlosky, D, Wang, C, Doherty, CL, Buckley, B, Ohman-Strickland, P, Miller, RK, O'Connor, TG et al.. Prenatal Cadmium Exposure and Maternal Sex Steroid Hormone Concentrations across Pregnancy. Toxics. 2023;11 (7):. doi: 10.3390/toxics11070589. PubMed PMID:37505555 PubMed Central PMC10384739
  8. Barrett, ES, Rivera-Núñez, Z, Getz, K, Ohman-Strickland, P, Zhang, R, Kozlosky, D, Doherty, CL, Buckley, BT, Brunner, J, Miller, RK et al.. Protective role of the placental efflux transporter BCRP/ABCG2 in the relationship between prenatal cadmium exposure, placenta weight, and size at birth. Environ Res. 2023;225 :115597. doi: 10.1016/j.envres.2023.115597. PubMed PMID:36863650 PubMed Central PMC10091184
  9. Kwok, G, Reese, S, Dugad, S, Donovan, KA, Tsui, J, Sahler, OJZ, Levonyan-Radloff, K, Barnett, ME, Manne, S, Ohman-Strickland, P et al.. Factors Associated with COVID‑19 Vaccine Uptake Among Adolescents and Young Adults Recently Diagnosed with Cancer. J Adolesc Young Adult Oncol. 2024;13 (2):352-357. doi: 10.1089/jayao.2022.0113. PubMed PMID:36367717 PubMed Central PMC10998015
  10. Collins, J, Henry, R, Kulkarni, D, Punjabi, K, Gundersen, D, Ohman-Strickland, P, McCoy, J. Association of patient satisfaction with use of text message by an emergency medical communication centre. Eur J Emerg Med. 2022;29 (6):460-461. doi: 10.1097/MEJ.0000000000000963. PubMed PMID:36300315 PubMed Central PMC9605184
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Reynold A Panettieri, MD
Rutgers UniversityInstitute of Translational Medicine
Photo of Hooman Parhizkar Ph.D
Hooman Parhizkar, Ph.D
Postdoctoral Fellow Rutgers UniversityEOHSI – Division of Environmental and Population Health Biosciences
Photo of Dhiru “Dru” Patel
Dhiru “Dru” Patel
Rutgers UniversityEOHSI – Central Administrattion
Pawat Pattarawat, Ph.D.
Postdoctoral Associate Rutgers UniversityEOHSI – Pharmacology & Toxicology
Emily Pearlman
Rutgers UniversityEOHSI – World Trade Center Health Program – Clinical Center of Excellence
Photo of Hoang Pham Ph.D.
Hoang Pham, Ph.D.
Professor and Chair, Industrial and Systems Engineering Rutgers University, School of EngineeringEOHSI – Environmental and Population Health Bio-Sciences

Full Bio

Research Areas

  • Software Reliability
  • Reliability Engineering
  • Biological Human Reliability
  • Maintenance Engineering
  • Mortality Analysis
  • Risk Assessment

Recent Publications

  1. Amari, S.V., Pham, H. and Misra, R.B. Reliability Characteristics of k-out-of-n Warm Standby Systems. Ieee Transactions on Reliability. 2012. 61:1007-1018.
  2. Kapur, P.K., Pham, H., Aggarwal, A.G. and Kaur, G. Two Dimensional Multi-Release Software Reliability Modeling and Optimal Release Planning. Ieee Transactions on Reliability. 2012. 61:758-768.
  3. Park, M. and Pham, H. A New Warranty Policy With Failure Times and Warranty Servicing Times. Ieee Transactions on Reliability. 2012. 61:822-831.
  4. Wang, Y.P. and Pham, H. Modeling the Dependent Competing Risks With Multiple Degradation Processes and Random Shock Using Time-Varying Copulas. Ieee Transactions on Reliability. 2012. 61:13-22.
  5. Kapur, P.K., Pham, H., Chanda, U. and Kumar, V. Optimal allocation of testing effort during testing and debugging phases: a control theoretic approach. International Journal of Systems Science. 2013. 44:1639-1650.
Laura T Pizzi, PharmD, MPH
Director, Health Outcomes, Policy, and Economics (HOPE) Program and Professor Rutgers UniversityErnest Mario School of Pharmacy
Photo of Michael Pratt M.D.
Michael Pratt, M.D.
Director of Residency Program in Occupational and Environmental Medicine Rutgers UniversityEOHSI – Clinical Research and Occupational Medicine

Education

  • MPH, UMDNJ School of Public Health, New Jersey
  • MD, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indiana

Current Professional Activities

  • Residency Director, Rutgers Occupational & Environmental Medicine Residency
  • Clinical Physician in the Employee, Occupational Health, and World Trade Center Clinics

Memberships

  • American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
  • American College of Preventive Medicine
  • Past Member of American College of Emergency Physicians

Honors

  • Bernard D. Goldstein, MD Award for Academic Excellence
  • Delta Omega, Alpha Eta Chapter, Public Health Honorary Society

Research Interests

Dr. Pratt is interested in the recognition, management, and prevention of illness and injury from conditions and exposures in the home, community, and workplace environment. He works to advance occupational and environmental resident physician education. He is a principle investigator (PI) on the NIOSH training grant and the PI for an annual national survey of Occupational and Environmental Medicine program directors. His most recent interests include occupationally-acquired methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

Photo of Wendy M Purcell Ph.D., FRSA
Wendy M Purcell, Ph.D., FRSA
Professor Rutgers University – School of Public HealthEOHSI Division of Environmental and Population Health Biosciences

Website: https://sph.rutgers.edu/directory/wendy-purcell

Dr. Purcell joined Rutgers University as a full Professor in 2022 in the Rutgers School of Public Health, Department of Environmental and Occupational Health and Justice. She has a PhD in Immunopharmacology (University College London CNAA) and a BSc (Honors) in Biological Sciences (Plymouth University CNAA). After her NAB-funded postdoctoral research and a fellowship with The Wellcome Trust and BBC Science Unit, Dr. Purcell was promoted to full professor and Head of Divion of Physiology, Pharmacology and Toxicology (1993-1997), Head of Department of Biological and Biomedical Sciences (1997-2000), Dean of Applied Sciences (2000-2004), Vice-President Research (2003-2005), Provost (2005-2007), and University President (2007-2015). She joined Harvard University (2016-2022) as an Academic Research Scholar in the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and remains an Affiliated Scientist with the School. Dr. Purcell is a Visiting Professor with University College London in the Global Business School for Health.

Photo of Jared D Radbel MD
Jared D Radbel, MD
Assistant Professor Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School-PulmonologyDepartment of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care

Dr. Radbel is Assistant Professor in the Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School.  He is a pulmonary and critical Care physician, who specializes in the treatment of patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS).  He is a member of Rutgers Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute and the Rutgers NJ Alliance for Clinical and Translational Science (NJACTS) Society of Scholars.

Education

  • Pulmonary and Critical Care Fellowship, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School
  • Internal Medicine Residency, Staten Island University Hospital
  • MD, American University of the Caribbean School of Medicine
  • BA, State University of New York (SUNY) at Binghamton

Research Areas

Ozone is a ubiquitous urban air pollutant that has been directly linked to the development of the heavily morbid acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS).  Dr. Radbel is currently funded by an NIEHS K08 Mentored Clinical Scientist Development Award (K08ES031678) to study the role of macrophage efferocytosis in ozone-induced ARDS.  He works in the laboratories of his mentors Debra L. Laskin PhD and Andrew J. Gow PhD. During the COVID-19 pandemic, he served as the Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School site PI for the multicenter Study of the Treatment and Outcomes in Critically Ill Patients With COVID-19 (STOP-COVID) database.

Scholarly Activities

  • Environmental Health Policy Committee Member, American Thoracic Society (ATS), May 2023-May 2024
  • Planning Committee Member, Environmental, Occupational and Population Health (EOPH) assembly of the American Thoracic Society (ATS), May 2023 – May 2024
  • Programming Committee Member, Environmental, Occupational and Population Health (EOPH) assembly of the American Thoracic Society (ATS), May 2018 – May 2023

In the News

  • In 2023, Dr. Radbel was selected as an Honorable Mention in the Society for Leukocyte Biology Image Contest
  • In 2020, Dr. Radbel was awarded the Career Development Award by the Rutgers NIEHS CEED. Jan 2020
  • In 2018, Dr. Radbel was awarded Donald E. Gardner Inhalational Toxicology Education Award by the Society of Toxicology
  • In 2014, Dr. Radbel was awarded the Young Investigator Award by the American College of Chest Physicians.
  1. Radbel, J, Meshanni, JA, Vayas, KN, Le-Hoang, O, Abramova, E, Zhou, P, Joseph, LB, Laskin, JD, Gow, AJ, Laskin, DL et al.. Effects of ozone exposure on lung injury, inflammation, and oxidative stress in a murine model of non-pneumonic endotoxemia. Toxicol Sci. 2024; :. doi: 10.1093/toxsci/kfae062. PubMed PMID:38749002
  2. Radbel, J, Meshanni, JA, Gardner, CR, Le-Hoang, O, Cervelli, J, Laskin, JD, Gow, AJ, Laskin, DL. Novel method to assess resident alveolar macrophage efferocytosis of apoptotic neutrophils by flow cytometry. Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 2023;460 :116359. doi: 10.1016/j.taap.2022.116359. PubMed PMID:36565939 PubMed Central PMC9870943
  3. Sunil, VR, Vayas, KN, Radbel, J, Abramova, E, Gow, A, Laskin, JD, Laskin, DL. Impaired energy metabolism and altered functional activity of alveolar type II epithelial cells following exposure of rats to nitrogen mustard. Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 2022;456 :116257. doi: 10.1016/j.taap.2022.116257. PubMed PMID:36174670
  4. Datta, P, Ukey, R, Bruiners, N, Honnen, W, Carayannopoulos, MO, Reichman, C, Choudhary, A, Onyuka, A, Handler, D, Guerrini, V et al.. Highly versatile antibody binding assay for the detection of SARS-CoV-2 infection and vaccination. J Immunol Methods. 2021;499 :113165. doi: 10.1016/j.jim.2021.113165. PubMed PMID:34634317 PubMed Central PMC8500840
  5. Churpek, MM, Gupta, S, Spicer, AB, Hayek, SS, Srivastava, A, Chan, L, Melamed, ML, Brenner, SK, Radbel, J, Madhani-Lovely, F et al.. Machine Learning Prediction of Death in Critically Ill Patients With Coronavirus Disease 2019. Crit Care Explor. 2021;3 (8):e0515. doi: 10.1097/CCE.0000000000000515. PubMed PMID:34476402 PubMed Central PMC8378790
  6. Datta, P, Ukey, R, Bruiners, N, Honnen, W, Carayannopoulos, MO, Reichman, C, Choudhary, A, Onyuka, A, Handler, D, Guerrini, V et al.. Highly versatile antibody binding assay for the detection of SARS-CoV-2 infection. medRxiv. 2021; :. doi: 10.1101/2021.07.09.21260266. PubMed PMID:34282427 PubMed Central PMC8288160
  7. Douin, DJ, Shaefi, S, Brenner, SK, Gupta, S, Park, I, Wright, FL, Mathews, KS, Chan, L, Al-Samkari, H, Orfanos, S et al.. Tissue Plasminogen Activator in Critically Ill Adults with COVID-19. Ann Am Thorac Soc. 2021;18 (11):1917-1921. doi: 10.1513/AnnalsATS.202102-127RL. PubMed PMID:33872546 PubMed Central PMC8641829
  8. Mathews, KS, Soh, H, Shaefi, S, Wang, W, Bose, S, Coca, S, Gupta, S, Hayek, SS, Srivastava, A, Brenner, SK et al.. Prone Positioning and Survival in Mechanically Ventilated Patients With Coronavirus Disease 2019-Related Respiratory Failure. Crit Care Med. 2021;49 (7):1026-1037. doi: 10.1097/CCM.0000000000004938. PubMed PMID:33595960 PubMed Central PMC8277560
  9. Khan, AR, Misdary, C, Yegya-Raman, N, Kim, S, Narayanan, N, Siddiqui, S, Salgame, P, Radbel, J, Groote, F, Michel, C et al.. Montelukast in hospitalized patients diagnosed with COVID-19. J Asthma. 2022;59 (4):780-786. doi: 10.1080/02770903.2021.1881967. PubMed PMID:33577360 PubMed Central PMC7938648
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Sally Radovick, M.D.
Professor, Department of Pediiatrics Rutgers UniversityRBHS, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School
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Elaine Randolph
Rutgers UniversityEOHSI – Clinical Research and Occupational Medicine
Skylar Reams
Senior Receptionist Rutgers UniversityEOHSI- Clinical Research and Occupational Medicine
Tracy Reid, MPH
Administrator, WTC Health Program Rutgers UniversityEOHSI – Clinical Research and Occupational Medicine
Photo of Kenneth Reuhl Ph.D., D.A.B.T.
Kenneth Reuhl, Ph.D., D.A.B.T.
Professor Rutgers University, Ernest Mario School of PharmacyEOHSI – Toxicology

Research Areas

My laboratory is interested in numerous facets of central nervous system pathology, particularly in developmental neurotoxicology, traumatic brain injury, and the differential responses of various CNS cell types to insult.  We are particularly interested in the recruitment of endogenous neural stem cells to sites of injury as a potential therapeutic approach to brain injury.

The laboratory also provides diagnostic histopathology support to investigators across the Rutgers community

Research Highlights

  • Established a lateral fluid percussion model for TBI and initiated studies of persistent blood-brain-barrier defects following closed-head injury
  • Investigated the comparative neurotoxicity of amphoterocin-type fungicides
  • Examining the developmental pathology of low-dose methylmercury exposure in vitro and in vivo
  • Documented recruitment of periventricular stem cells to the hippocampus following chemical injury

Scholarly Activities

  • Review Article Editor-NeuroToxicology
  • President-MidAtlantic Society of Toxicology
  • External Advisory Committee-University of Michigan Toxicology Program

Recent Publications

  1. Eddy, K, Gupta, K, Pelletier, JC, Isola, AL, Marinaro, C, Rasheed, MA, Campagnolo, J, Eddin, MN, Rossi, M, Fateeva, A et al.. A Spontaneous Melanoma Mouse Model Applicable for a Longitudinal Chemotherapy and Immunotherapy Study. J Invest Dermatol. 2023;143 (10):2007-2018.e6. doi: 10.1016/j.jid.2023.03.1664. PubMed PMID:36997110 PubMed Central PMC10524215
  2. Chen, T, Liu, AB, Sun, S, Ajami, NJ, Ross, MC, Wang, H, Zhang, L, Reuhl, K, Kobayashi, K, Onishi, JC et al.. Green Tea Polyphenols Modify the Gut Microbiome in db/db Mice as Co-Abundance Groups Correlating with the Blood Glucose Lowering Effect. Mol Nutr Food Res. 2019;63 (8):e1801064. doi: 10.1002/mnfr.201801064. PubMed PMID:30667580 PubMed Central PMC6494111
  3. Feng, S, Dai, Z, Liu, AB, Huang, J, Narsipur, N, Guo, G, Kong, B, Reuhl, K, Lu, W, Luo, Z et al.. Intake of stigmasterol and β-sitosterol alters lipid metabolism and alleviates NAFLD in mice fed a high-fat western-style diet. Biochim Biophys Acta Mol Cell Biol Lipids. 2018;1863 (10):1274-1284. doi: 10.1016/j.bbalip.2018.08.004. PubMed PMID:30305244 PubMed Central PMC6226309
  4. Hossain, MM, Weig, B, Reuhl, K, Gearing, M, Wu, LJ, Richardson, JR. The anti-parkinsonian drug zonisamide reduces neuroinflammation: Role of microglial Nav 1.6. Exp Neurol. 2018;308 :111-119. doi: 10.1016/j.expneurol.2018.07.005. PubMed PMID:30017881 PubMed Central PMC7404626
  5. Jabbar, S, Reuhl, K, Sarkar, DK. Prenatal alcohol exposure increases the susceptibility to develop aggressive prolactinomas in the pituitary gland. Sci Rep. 2018;8 (1):7720. doi: 10.1038/s41598-018-25785-y. PubMed PMID:29769550 PubMed Central PMC5955957
  6. Huang, J, Feng, S, Liu, A, Dai, Z, Wang, H, Reuhl, K, Lu, W, Yang, CS. Green Tea Polyphenol EGCG Alleviates Metabolic Abnormality and Fatty Liver by Decreasing Bile Acid and Lipid Absorption in Mice. Mol Nutr Food Res. 2018;62 (4):. doi: 10.1002/mnfr.201700696. PubMed PMID:29278293 PubMed Central PMC6350933
  7. Meng, Y, Wiseman, JA, Nemtsova, Y, Moore, DF, Guevarra, J, Reuhl, K, Banks, WA, Daneman, R, Sleat, DE, Lobel, P et al.. A Basic ApoE-Based Peptide Mediator to Deliver Proteins across the Blood-Brain Barrier: Long-Term Efficacy, Toxicity, and Mechanism. Mol Ther. 2017;25 (7):1531-1543. doi: 10.1016/j.ymthe.2017.03.037. PubMed PMID:28456380 PubMed Central PMC5498811
  8. Garbuzenko, OB, Ivanova, V, Kholodovych, V, Reimer, DC, Reuhl, KR, Yurkow, E, Adler, D, Minko, T. Combinatorial treatment of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis using nanoparticles with prostaglandin E and siRNA(s). Nanomedicine. 2017;13 (6):1983-1992. doi: 10.1016/j.nano.2017.04.005. PubMed PMID:28434932 PubMed Central PMC5546883
  9. Chen, JX, Wang, H, Liu, A, Zhang, L, Reuhl, K, Yang, CS. From the Cover: PhIP/DSS-Induced Colon Carcinogenesis in CYP1A-Humanized Mice and the Possible Role of Lgr5+ Stem Cells. Toxicol Sci. 2017;155 (1):224-233. doi: 10.1093/toxsci/kfw190. PubMed PMID:27664423 PubMed Central PMC5216652
  10. Das, G, Yu, Q, Hui, R, Reuhl, K, Gale, NW, Zhou, R. EphA5 and EphA6: regulation of neuronal and spine morphology. Cell Biosci. 2016;6 :48. doi: 10.1186/s13578-016-0115-5. PubMed PMID:27489614 PubMed Central PMC4971699
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George G Rhoads, M.D., M.P.H.
Professor Emeritus Rutgers University, School of Public HealthEOHSI – Environmental Epidemiology and Statistics

Dr. Rhoads is Chairman of the CDC Advisory Committee on Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention

Research Areas

Management of lead exposure in children; Measurement error in environmental epidemiology, Effects of low level lead exposure.

Scholarly Activities

  • Member, American Epidemiological Society, 1984
  • NIH Director’s Award, 1985
  • First Hunterdon Health Fund Endowed Professorship at UMDNJ, 1989
  • Sullivan Award, New Jersey Public Health Association, 2003
  • Abraham Lilienfeld Award, American Public Health Association, 2008

Recent Publications

  1. Rhoads, GG. Lower versus Higher Glycemic Criteria for Diagnosis of Gestational Diabetes. N Engl J Med. 2022;387 (18):1719-1720. doi: 10.1056/NEJMc2212585. PubMed PMID:36322856
  2. Jain, NJ, Faiz, AS, Ohman-Strickland, PA, Smulian, JC, Rhoads, GG. Educational Attainment of Grandmothers and Preterm Birth in Grandchildren. Matern Child Health J. 2021;25 (2):293-301. doi: 10.1007/s10995-020-03021-2. PubMed PMID:33184745
  3. Iglay, K, Santorelli, ML, Hirshfield, KM, Williams, JM, Rhoads, GG, Lin, Y, Demissie, K. Impact of Preexisting Mental Illness on All-Cause and Breast Cancer-Specific Mortality in Elderly Patients With Breast Cancer. J Clin Oncol. 2017;35 (36):4012-4018. doi: 10.1200/JCO.2017.73.4947. PubMed PMID:28934000
  4. Iglay, K, Santorelli, ML, Hirshfield, KM, Williams, JM, Rhoads, GG, Lin, Y, Demissie, K. Diagnosis and treatment delays among elderly breast cancer patients with pre-existing mental illness. Breast Cancer Res Treat. 2017;166 (1):267-275. doi: 10.1007/s10549-017-4399-x. PubMed PMID:28726159
  5. Santorelli, ML, Hirshfield, KM, Steinberg, MB, Lin, Y, Rhoads, GG, Bandera, EV, Demissie, K. Racial differences in the effects of comorbidity on breast cancer-specific survival. Cancer Causes Control. 2017;28 (8):809-817. doi: 10.1007/s10552-017-0915-x. PubMed PMID:28643109
  6. Swerdel, JN, Rhoads, GG, Cheng, JQ, Cosgrove, NM, Moreyra, AE, Kostis, JB, Kostis, WJ, Myocardial Infarction Data Acquisition System (MIDAS 29) Study Group. Ischemic Stroke Rate Increases in Young Adults: Evidence for a Generational Effect?. J Am Heart Assoc. 2016;5 (12):. doi: 10.1161/JAHA.116.004245. PubMed PMID:27881427 PubMed Central PMC5210414
  7. Santorelli, ML, Hirshfield, KM, Steinberg, MB, Rhoads, GG, Lin, Y, Demissie, K. Hormonal therapy for breast cancer and diabetes incidence among postmenopausal women. Ann Epidemiol. 2016;26 (6):436-40. doi: 10.1016/j.annepidem.2016.04.004. PubMed PMID:27157863
  8. Paddock, LE, Lu, SE, Bandera, EV, Rhoads, GG, Fine, J, Paine, S, Barnhill, R, Berwick, M. Skin self-examination and long-term melanoma survival. Melanoma Res. 2016;26 (4):401-8. doi: 10.1097/CMR.0000000000000255. PubMed PMID:26990272
  9. Santorelli, ML, Steinberg, MB, Hirshfield, KM, Rhoads, GG, Bandera, EV, Lin, Y, Demissie, K. Effects of breast cancer on chronic disease medication adherence among older women. Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2016;25 (8):898-907. doi: 10.1002/pds.3971. PubMed PMID:26875432
  10. Swerdel, JN, Rhoads, GG, Cosgrove, NM, Kostis, JB, Myocardial Infarction Data Acquisition System (MIDAS 25) Study Group. Rates of Hospitalization for Dehydration Following Hurricane Sandy in New Jersey. Disaster Med Public Health Prep. 2016;10 (2):188-92. doi: 10.1017/dmp.2015.169. PubMed PMID:26654113
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Photo of Zorimar Rivera-Nunez Ph.D., M.S.
Zorimar Rivera-Nunez, Ph.D., M.S.
Assistant Professor Rutgers School of Public Health – Department of Biostatistics and EpidemiologyEOHSI – Environmental and Population Health Biosciences

Biography

Biography
Dr. Rivera-Núñez holds a BS in Microbiology and a MS in Environmental Health Sciences from the University of Puerto Rico. Her doctoral degree is from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, MI. She completed a National Academies post-doctoral fellowship at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, National Center for Environmental Assessment in Cincinnati, OH. Dr. Rivera-Núñez joined the Rutgers School of Public Health in 2019. She is a resident faculty member at the Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute.

Research Areas
Current exposure assessment tools such as biomarkers potentially allow for increasingly sensitive measures of exposure-related impending adverse health effects. However, developing biomarkers that correlate with specific time windows that are more susceptible to environmental insult is an ongoing challenge. We need to improve epidemiological study design and increase our knowledge on the biological mechanisms behind a chemical’s toxicity. Dr. Rivera-Núñez research focuses on: (1) the utility of biomarkers identifying windows of exposure and susceptibility, particularly for emergent chemicals, (2) the impact of these chemicals in fetal and child growth, and (3) the endocrine and placental mechanisms behind these associations.

Areas of Study

Dr. Rivera-Núñez is currently funded by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) to study zearalenone exposure during pregnancy and early infant growth (R01ESO2275-02S1, R21ES032047). She also receives funding from the NIH Environmental Influences on Child Health Outcomes (ECHO) program to study how placental transporters influence the associations between maternal exposures and child outcomes.

Scholarly Activities

Early Career Reviewer Program National Institute of Health
Society of Pediatric and Perinatal Epidemiology Research
International Society of Exposure Science
International Society of Environmental Epidemiology

Select Publications

Rivera-Núñez Z, Ashrap P, Barrett ES, Llanos A, Watkins DJ, Cathey AL, Vélez-Vega, CM, Rosario Z, Cordero JF, Alshawabkeh A, Meeker JD. 2022. Personal Care Products: Demographic Characteristics and Maternal Hormones in Pregnant Women from Puerto Rico, Environmental Research PMID: 34798118

Kinkade CW, Rivera-Núñez Z, Gorczyca L, Aleksunes LA, Barrett ES. 2021. Impact of Fusarium-Derived Mycoestrogens on Female Reproduction: A Systematic Review. Toxins PMID: 34073731

Rivera-Núñez Z, Ashrap P, Barrett ES, Watkins DJ, Cathey AL, Vélez-Vega, CM, Rosario Z, Cordero JF, Alshawabkeh A, Meeker JD. 2021. Association of Biomarkers of Exposure to metals and metalloids with maternal hormones in pregnant women from Puerto Rico. Environment International.  PMID: 33321388

Rivera-Núñez, Z., Barrett, E., Szamreta, E., Shapses, S., Qin, B., Lin, Y., Zarbl, H., Buckley, B., Bandera, E. 2019. “Urinary mycoestrogens and age and height at menarche in New Jersey girls.” Environmental Health PMID: 30902092

Rivera-Núñez Z and Wright JM. 2018. The effect of trihalomethane and haloacetic acid exposures on stillbirth in Massachusetts. Occupational and Environmental Medicine PMID: 30061312

Wright, J.M., Evans, A., Kaufman, J.A., Rivera-Núñez, Z., Narotzky, M.G. (2017) “The association between disinfectant by-product exposures and risk of cardiac birth defects in Massachusetts.” Environmental Health Perspectives PMID: 27518881

Rivera-Núñez, Z., Wright, J., Blount, B., Silva, L., Jones, E., Chan, R., Pegram, R., Singer, P., Savitz, D. (2012) “Comparison of trihalomethanes in tap water and blood: a case study in the United States.”, Environmental Health Perspectives PMID: 22281753

Parvez S, Rivera-Núñez Z, Meyer A, Wright JM. (2011). Temporal variability in trihalomethane and haloacetic acid concentrations in Massachusetts public drinking water systems. Environmental Research PMID: 21316653

Rivera-Núñez Z, Meliker JR, Meeker JD, Slotnick MJ, Nriagu JO. 2012. Urinary arsenic species, toenail arsenic, and estimates of arsenic intake in a southeastern Michigan population with low-to-moderate exposure to arsenic in drinking water. Journal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology PMID: 21878987

 

Full Library: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/myncbi/zorimar.rivera-nunez.1/bibliography/public/

 

Photo of Mark Gregory Robson Ph.D., M.P.H., Dr.P.H.
Mark Gregory Robson, Ph.D., M.P.H., Dr.P.H.
Distinguished Professor, Associate Vice Provost for Graduate Education and Dean of the School of Graduate Studies Rutgers University, School of Environmental and Biological SciencesEOHSI – Environmental and Population Health Bio-Sciences – Global Environmental Health

WEB: https://plantbiology.rutgers.edu/faculty/robson/mark_robson.html

Dr. Robson’s CV

Research Areas

I am an applied exposure scientist and toxicologist.  In my work I focus on the reduction and elimination of pesticide exposure to farmers and farm families particularly in rural areas in developing countries.  My focus has been to measure and assess exposure and train farmers and farm workers.  My interest in agriculture comes from growing up on a family fruit and vegetable farm in Burlington County New Jersey, my first degree was in agricultural science and this has been the platform for my research, teaching and service work.  I have worked in Eastern Europe, West Africa, and Southeast Asia.  In Southeast Asia, my research and training projects were supported with funds from the Asian Development Bank as well as NIH Fogarty D43 TW007849.  For a period of 20 years I have taught more than 700 students in the Environmental Risk Assessment course taught at Chulalongkorn University.  I have also established the Rutgers Thai Fogarty ITREOH Center at the College of Public Health Sciences at Chulalongkorn University in Bangkok.  There I have mentored 50 MPH and PhD students and have directly supported 26 students from seven countries with NIH Fogarty funds for their thesis research. Also as a result of teaching risk assessment classes at Rutgers and in developing countries I developed a textbook with Dr. William Toscano (University of Minnesota) titled: Environmental Health Risk Assessment for Public Health (2007) the second edition of the textbook in currently in revision and due out at the end of 2020.

Research Highlights

My research focus is on pesticide exposure to farmers and farm families in developing countries, the major platform for this is the NIH FIC Thai International Training and Research in Environmental and Occupational Health grant.

Scholarly Activities

  • Thai FogartyI TREOH CenterGrant Number: D43 TW007849-01
  • FogartyInternationalCenter- National Institutes of Health – NIEHS Principal Investigator
  • US EPA Methane to Markets Partnership Grant Number XA-83444101-1Activities that Advance Methane Recovery and Use as a Clean Energy Source
  • USEPA – Office of Atmospheric Programs Principal Investigator

NJAES Hatch and Multi-State Projects

  • Project 2921 – Evaluating the Physical and Biological Availability of Pesticides and Contaminants in Agricultural Ecosystems and Project 3081 Agrochemical Impacts on Human and Environmental Health: Mechanisms and Mitigation

Recent Publications

Click here for additional publications by Dr. Robson.

  1. Rockafellow-Baldoni, M, Spayd, SE, Robson, MG. Microparticles of arsenic water treatment media and water softener resin observed in treated water at private wells. Water Environ Res. 2024;96 (6):e11067. doi: 10.1002/wer.11067. PubMed PMID:38866392
  2. Kunno, J, Luangwilai, T, Pimviriyakul, P, Sematong, S, Supawattanabodee, B, Kuratong, S, Robson, MG. Active smoking in urban households: An association between urinary cotinine metabolite level and serum eGFR concentration. Tob Induc Dis. 2024;22 :. doi: 10.18332/tid/186071. PubMed PMID:38586496 PubMed Central PMC10996036
  3. Kunno, J, Pimviriyakul, P, Luangwilai, T, Sematong, S, Supawattanabodee, B, Kuratong, S, Robson, MG. Effect of children secondhand smoke exposure associated with GABA concentration: Influence from parents who are extremely heavy smokers in urban households. Sci Total Environ. 2024;918 :170720. doi: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2024.170720. PubMed PMID:38325467
  4. Mokarat, M, Lomthaisong, K, Robson, MG, Keithmaleesatti, S. Effects of blood mercury accumulation on DNA methylation levels in the Khorat snail-eating turtle (Malayemys khoratensis). Ecotoxicol Environ Saf. 2024;269 :115770. doi: 10.1016/j.ecoenv.2023.115770. PubMed PMID:38043412
  5. Minorczyk, M, Czaja, K, Starski, A, Korcz, W, Liszewska, M, Lewiński, R, Robson, MG, Postupolski, J, Struciński, P. Assessment of Furan and Its Derivatives Intake with Home Prepared Meals and Characterization of Associated Risk for Polish Infants and Toddlers. Foods. 2023;12 (19):. doi: 10.3390/foods12193618. PubMed PMID:37835270 PubMed Central PMC10572828
  6. Rattanawitoon, T, Siriwong, W, Shendell, D, Fiedler, N, Robson, MG. An Evaluation of a Pesticide Training Program to Reduce Pesticide Exposure and Enhance Safety among Female Farmworkers in Nan, Thailand. Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2023;20 (17):. doi: 10.3390/ijerph20176635. PubMed PMID:37681775 PubMed Central PMC10487852
  7. Sombatsawat, E, Luangwilai, T, Kaewchandee, C, Robson, MG, Siriwong, W. Impact of environmental heat exposure on the health status in farmworkers, Nakhon Ratchasima, Thailand. Rocz Panstw Zakl Hig. 2023;74 (1):103-111. doi: 10.32394/rpzh.2023.0250. PubMed PMID:37013902
  8. Oludoye, OO, Siriwong, W, Robson, MG. Pesticide Safety Behavior among Cocoa Farmers in Nigeria: Current Trends and Determinants. J Agromedicine. 2023;28 (3):470-485. doi: 10.1080/1059924X.2022.2148147. PubMed PMID:36377752
  9. Kunno, J, Yubonpunt, P, Sumanasrethakul, C, Kaewchandee, C, Robson, MG, Wanichnopparat, W, Prasittichok, K, Luangwilai, T, Chaichan, C, Krainara, P et al.. Satisfaction with COVID-19 Vaccines in Health Care Workers and the General Population: A Cross-Sectional Study in Urban Bangkok, Thailand. Vaccines (Basel). 2022;10 (8):. doi: 10.3390/vaccines10081345. PubMed PMID:36016234 PubMed Central PMC9413823
  10. Luangwilai, T, Robson, MG, Siriwong, W. Investigation of kidney function changes in sea salt workers during harvest season in Thailand. Rocz Panstw Zakl Hig. 2022;73 (1):121-130. doi: 10.32394/rpzh.2022.0201. PubMed PMID:35322964
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Mario Rodriguez
Unit Computing Manager Rutgers UniversityEOHSI – Central Administration/Network Services
Photo of Troy A Roepke Ph.D.
Troy A Roepke, Ph.D.
Professor Associate Dean of Diversity, Equity, and InclusionSchool of Environmental and Biological Sciences
Photo of Elizabeth Rossi
Elizabeth Rossi
Rutgers UniversityEOHSI – Toxicology
Photo of Dona Schneider Ph.D., M.P.H.
Dona Schneider, Ph.D., M.P.H.
Professor and Associate Dean for Programs Rutgers University, Bloustein SchoolEOHSI – Environmental Health Policy

Dona Schneider is Professor and Associate Dean for Programs at the Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy of Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey. Dr. Schneider teaches epidemiology at both Rutgers and the UMDNJ-School of Public Health. She serves as article, book and grant reviewer for more than 30 journals, agencies and publishing houses; and has served as thesis chair for more than 35 graduate students. Her research record includes more than 100 refereed journal articles, books and book chapters, mostly focusing on mortality, morbidity and risk factors for disease, especially for children and minorities. Dr. Schneider also serves as PI for the HIV Community Prevention, Support and Development Initiative (HIV CPSDI), a Bloustein unit that trains and provides technical assistance to community-based organizations working to prevent the spread of HIV in New Jersey.

Full Bio

Research Areas

Health and Policy Issues Facing American Children and Minorities; Mortality; Morbidity; and High Risk Behaviors

Scholarly Activities

  • 2005 Recognition Award for Service to the Editorial Board, American Journal of Public Health
  • 2004 Recognition Award for Public Service, NJ HIV Community Planning Group
  • 2002 Recognition for Public Service – Township of Princeton, NJ
  • 2002 University of Medicine and Dentistry Foundation Teaching Award
  • 2002 Elected to Delta Omega – Honorary Society for Public Health
  • 1997 Elected Fellow – American College of Epidemiology
  • 1996 Special Service Award – Rutgers Academy of Life-long Learning
  • 1991 Elected to Miami Group for Young Scholars – Association of American Geographers
  • 1989 Special Service Award – Princeton Joint Environmental Commission
  • 1985 Jacques M. May Thesis Prize – Association of American Geographers
  • 1979 Phi Kappa Phi, Summa Cum Laude, Trenton State College

Recent Publications

  1. Greenberg, M, Schneider, D donas@rutgers.edu. Population density: What does it really mean in geographical health studies?. Health Place. 2023;81 :103001. doi: 10.1016/j.healthplace.2023.103001. PubMed PMID:36947902
  2. Black, CM, Vesco, KK, Mehta, V, Ohman-Strickland, P, Demissie, K, Schneider, D. Costs of Severe Maternal Morbidity in U.S. Commercially Insured and Medicaid Populations: An Updated Analysis. Womens Health Rep (New Rochelle). 2021;2 (1):443-451. doi: 10.1089/whr.2021.0026. PubMed PMID:34671765 PubMed Central PMC8524749
  3. Black, CM, Vesco, KK, Mehta, V, Ohman-Strickland, P, Demissie, K, Schneider, D. Hospital Readmission Following Delivery With and Without Severe Maternal Morbidity. J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2021;30 (12):1736-1743. doi: 10.1089/jwh.2020.8815. PubMed PMID:33978478
  4. Black, CM, Vesco, KK, Mehta, V, Ohman-Strickland, P, Demissie, K, Schneider, D. Incidence of Severe Maternal Morbidity During Delivery Hospitalization in U.S. Commercially Insured and Medicaid Populations. J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2022;31 (1):91-99. doi: 10.1089/jwh.2020.8556. PubMed PMID:33891488
  5. Schneider, D, Greenberg, MR. Urban Planning and Public Health:: Synergies for Achieving a Healthy Delaware. Dela J Public Health. 2018;4 (2):56-63. doi: 10.32481/djph.2018.03.011. PubMed PMID:34466965 PubMed Central PMC8396702
  6. Gezmu, T, Schneider, D, Demissie, K, Lin, Y, Gizzi, MS. Risk factors for acute stroke among South Asians compared to other racial/ethnic groups. PLoS One. 2014;9 (9):e108901. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0108901. PubMed PMID:25268987 PubMed Central PMC4182514
  7. Gezmu, T, Schneider, D, Demissie, K, Lin, Y, Giordano, C, Gizzi, MS. Lipid profiles and ischemic stroke risk: variations by sex within racial/ethnic groups. Int J Womens Health. 2014;6 :585-95. doi: 10.2147/IJWH.S61274. PubMed PMID:24940081 PubMed Central PMC4051728
  8. Gezmu, T, Gizzi, MS, Kirmani, JF, Schneider, D, Moussavi, M. Disparities in acute stroke severity, outcomes, and care relative to health insurance status. J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis. 2014;23 (2):e93-8. doi: 10.1016/j.jstrokecerebrovasdis.2013.08.027. PubMed PMID:24103662
  9. Schneider, D, Colaco, M, Markowski, P, Barone, JG. Urinary dysfunction in children is associated with exposure to environmental tobacco smoke. J Pediatr Urol. 2013;9 (6 Pt B):1116-21. doi: 10.1016/j.jpurol.2013.04.009. PubMed PMID:23702349
  10. Schneider, D, Yamamoto, A, Barone, JG. Evaluation of consistency between physician clinical impression and 3 validated survey instruments for measuring lower urinary tract symptoms in children. J Urol. 2011;186 (1):261-5. doi: 10.1016/j.juro.2011.03.049. PubMed PMID:21600599
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Photo of Stephan Schwander M.D., Ph.D.
Stephan Schwander, M.D., Ph.D.
Associate Professor and Director, Center of Global Public Health Rutgers University- School of Public HealthEOHSI – Environmental Health Policy

The primary goal of my translational research is to improve the understanding of environmental effects on human health and human immunity during infections such as with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb), the bacterium that causes TB. For the past 15 years my lab, in collaboration with others, has spearheaded research on human lung immune responses to M.tb. Our findings helped to establish the concept of compartmentalization of immune responses to the lungs in human pulmonary TB.

Recent studies from my lab with co-investigators at EOHSI and at the University of Southern California (USC), have shown that stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) with diesel exhaust particles (DEPs) alter cytokine production and toll-like receptor-mediated M.tb-specific cell activation pathways. DEPs are major components of aerosolized urban ambient fine particulate matter (PM). We noted that the production of critical M.tb-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, IL-1 beta, and IL-6 was reduced in a DEP dose-dependent manner in PBMC. Furthermore, inhibition of expression of many NF-kB and IFN regulatory signaling pathway target genes was observed upon DEP stimulation in non-infected cells. These data suggest that DEPs downregulate M.tb-induced cytokine and gene expression responses thus significantly compromising antimycobacterial host immune responses.

Research Interests

  • Human antimycobacterial immunity
  • Human lung immunology during mycobacteriumtuberculosis infection and disease
  • Effects of particulate matter on antimycobacterial immunity

Recent Publications

  1. Son, Y, Weisel, C, Wackowski, O, Schwander, S, Delnevo, C, Meng, Q. The Impact of Device Settings, Use Patterns, and Flavorings on Carbonyl Emissions from Electronic Cigarettes. Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2020;17 (16):. doi: 10.3390/ijerph17165650. PubMed PMID:32764435 PubMed Central PMC7460324
  2. Son, Y, Mainelis, G, Delnevo, C, Wackowski, OA, Schwander, S, Meng, Q. Investigating E-Cigarette Particle Emissions and Human Airway Depositions under Various E-Cigarette-Use Conditions. Chem Res Toxicol. 2020;33 (2):343-352. doi: 10.1021/acs.chemrestox.9b00243. PubMed PMID:31804072 PubMed Central PMC7301609
  3. Ibironke, O, Carranza, C, Sarkar, S, Torres, M, Choi, HT, Nwoko, J, Black, K, Quintana-Belmares, R, Osornio-Vargas, Á, Ohman-Strickland, P et al.. Urban Air Pollution Particulates Suppress Human T-Cell Responses to Mycobacterium Tuberculosis. Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2019;16 (21):. doi: 10.3390/ijerph16214112. PubMed PMID:31731429 PubMed Central PMC6862251
  4. Sarkar, S, Rivas-Santiago, CE, Ibironke, OA, Carranza, C, Meng, Q, Osornio-Vargas, Á, Zhang, J, Torres, M, Chow, JC, Watson, JG et al.. Season and size of urban particulate matter differentially affect cytotoxicity and human immune responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis. PLoS One. 2019;14 (7):e0219122. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0219122. PubMed PMID:31295271 PubMed Central PMC6622489
  5. Torres, M, Carranza, C, Sarkar, S, Gonzalez, Y, Osornio Vargas, A, Black, K, Meng, Q, Quintana-Belmares, R, Hernandez, M, Angeles Garcia, JJF et al.. Urban airborne particle exposure impairs human lung and blood Mycobacterium tuberculosis immunity. Thorax. 2019;74 (7):675-683. doi: 10.1136/thoraxjnl-2018-212529. PubMed PMID:31036772 PubMed Central PMC7162557
  6. Son, Y, Mishin, V, Laskin, JD, Mainelis, G, Wackowski, OA, Delnevo, C, Schwander, S, Khlystov, A, Samburova, V, Meng, Q et al.. Hydroxyl Radicals in E-Cigarette Vapor and E-Vapor Oxidative Potentials under Different Vaping Patterns. Chem Res Toxicol. 2019;32 (6):1087-1095. doi: 10.1021/acs.chemrestox.8b00400. PubMed PMID:30977360 PubMed Central PMC6579624
  7. Kirenga, BJ, Nantanda, R, de Jong, C, Mugenyi, L, Meng, Q, Aniku, G, Williams, S, Aanyu-Tukamuhebwa, H, Kamya, M, Schwander, S et al.. Lung Function of Children at Three Sites of Varying Ambient Air Pollution Levels in Uganda: A Cross Sectional Comparative Study. Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2018;15 (12):. doi: 10.3390/ijerph15122653. PubMed PMID:30486291 PubMed Central PMC6313711
  8. Son, Y, Wackowski, O, Weisel, C, Schwander, S, Mainelis, G, Delnevo, C, Meng, Q. Evaluation of E-Vapor Nicotine and Nicotyrine Concentrations under Various E-Liquid Compositions, Device Settings, and Vaping Topographies. Chem Res Toxicol. 2018;31 (9):861-868. doi: 10.1021/acs.chemrestox.8b00063. PubMed PMID:30080399 PubMed Central PMC6350771
  9. Son, Y, Osornio-Vargas, ÁR, O'Neill, MS, Hystad, P, Texcalac-Sangrador, JL, Ohman-Strickland, P, Meng, Q, Schwander, S. Land use regression models to assess air pollution exposure in Mexico City using finer spatial and temporal input parameters. Sci Total Environ. 2018;639 :40-48. doi: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.05.144. PubMed PMID:29778680 PubMed Central PMC10896644
  10. Ellis, T, Chiappi, M, García-Trenco, A, Al-Ejji, M, Sarkar, S, Georgiou, TK, Shaffer, MSP, Tetley, TD, Schwander, S, Ryan, MP et al.. Multimetallic Microparticles Increase the Potency of Rifampicin against Intracellular Mycobacterium tuberculosis. ACS Nano. 2018;12 (6):5228-5240. doi: 10.1021/acsnano.7b08264. PubMed PMID:29767993
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Photo of Stuart Shapiro Ph.D.
Stuart Shapiro, Ph.D.
Associate Professor Rutgers University, Bloustein SchoolEOHSI – Environmental Health Policy

Stuart Shapiro joined the Bloustein School faculty in 2003 after five years in the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs (OIRA) at the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) in Washington. In OIRA he analyzed and coordinated executive branch review in the areas of labor, health and social policy. Prior to working at OIRA he received his PhD in Public Policy from Harvard University where he studied how political factors impacted changes to child care regulations in eight states. He has taught courses at Harvard, Georgetown, and the USDA Graduate School.

Research Areas

Interplay between politics and policy analysis in the regulatory process. Recent areas of focus has been on the use of cost-benefit analysis and the regulatory process in the states.

Recent Publications

  1. Shapiro, S. Defragmenting the regulatory process. Risk Anal. 2011;31 (6):893-901. doi: 10.1111/j.1539-6924.2010.01556.x. PubMed PMID:21679219
  2. Shapiro, S. Evaluating the benefits and costs of regulatory reforms: what questions need to be asked?. Eval Program Plann. 2008;31 (3):223-30. doi: 10.1016/j.evalprogplan.2008.03.008. PubMed PMID:18486971
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Photo of Derek G Shendell D. Env., M.P.H.
Derek G Shendell, D. Env., M.P.H.
Professor and Director of the NJ Safe Schools Program Rutgers University, School of Public HealthEOHSI – Environmental and Population Health Bio-Sciences

Education

  • D.Env, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health / Institute of the Environment and Sustainability
  • MPH, Yale University School of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Division of Environmental Health Sciences (Environmental Epidemiology and Policy tracks)
  • AB, Dartmouth College

Dr. Shendell’s CV

Research Areas

Dr. Shendell works to “bridge” science, education and policy in a multidisciplinary fashion to reduce and/or prevent environmental exposures and health effects. He focuses on community/schools-based research with local participation in planning and execution; educational trainings and materials, service and technical assistance; and informed/evidence-based policy advocacy.

Furthermore, he is Director of the NJ Safe Schools Program and co-facilitates the NJ OSHA Alliance, which are within the Center for School and Community Based Research and Education. The program includes injury surveillance (including only school-based system, online and in-print, for working minors and young adults), science-to-policy, regular statewide e-communications, and training for teachers and administrative professionals in secondary education (public and private) concerning safety and health.

Among many research and practice-oriented service activities outside NJ, he is Student Involvement co-Chair (Faculty Chair) of the American Public Health Association (APHA) – Environment (ENV) (and a member of both ENV and Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) sections), and an annual meeting abstract reviewer for APHA ENV and OHS as well as other international societies he is a member of. Inside NJ, he is an approved appointee by the State of NJ Governor’s office (multiple administrations) to the Commission on Environmental Education/Interagency Working Group and the Child Labor Advisory Board to advise the NJ Department of Environmental Protection and NJ Department of Labor and Workforce Development, respectively, using various data to inform decisions.

Research Highlights

  • Asthma among children and older adults, with novel exposure measurement techniques; etc.
  • Incident (injury, illness) surveillance among minors/young workers reported in NJ, including among special health care needs students;
  • Indoor air and environmental quality in homes, office buildings and schools, including portable versus traditional, site-built school classrooms and facilities;
  • Urban outdoor air quality and environment characterization, including relationships between indoor, outdoor, personal (adult, child) and in-vehicle air concentrations of fine particles and various toxic air contaminants;
  • Ventilation and energy efficiency, and linkages to student attendance.

Recent Publications

Click here for additional publications by Dr. Shendell.

  1. Aggarwal, J, Campbell, ML, Rehman, M, Nguyen, KT, Shendell, DG. Perspectives and Attitudes of Newer New Jersey High School Teachers towards Cleaning, Sanitizing, and Disinfecting Consumer Products Used in School Classrooms. Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2024;21 (2):. doi: 10.3390/ijerph21020211. PubMed PMID:38397700 PubMed Central PMC10887922
  2. Aggarwal, J, Nguyen, KT, Campbell, ML, Shiau, S, Shendell, DG. Factors Associated with COVID-19 Vaccine Hesitancy and Case Status among New Jersey Secondary Educational Professionals. Vaccines (Basel). 2023;11 (11):. doi: 10.3390/vaccines11111667. PubMed PMID:38005999 PubMed Central PMC10674534
  3. Rattanawitoon, T, Siriwong, W, Shendell, D, Fiedler, N, Robson, MG. An Evaluation of a Pesticide Training Program to Reduce Pesticide Exposure and Enhance Safety among Female Farmworkers in Nan, Thailand. Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2023;20 (17):. doi: 10.3390/ijerph20176635. PubMed PMID:37681775 PubMed Central PMC10487852
  4. Nguyen, KT, Aggarwal, J, Campbell, ML, Shiau, S, Shendell, DG. COVID-19 Vaccine Hesitancy among New Jersey Teachers and Impacts of Vaccination Information Dissemination. Vaccines (Basel). 2023;11 (2):. doi: 10.3390/vaccines11020466. PubMed PMID:36851344 PubMed Central PMC9967281
  5. Shendell, DG, Black, LF, Way, Y, Aggarwal, J, Campbell, MLF, Nguyen, KT. Knowledge, Attitudes, and Awareness of New Jersey Public High School Students about Concepts of Climate Change, including Environmental Justice. Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2023;20 (3):. doi: 10.3390/ijerph20031922. PubMed PMID:36767299 PubMed Central PMC9915891
  6. Campbell, ML, Shendell, DG. Survey of New Jersey K-12 Professionals on Work-Based Learning During COVID-19: A Preliminary Study and Future Implications. J Sch Health. 2023;93 (2):123-127. doi: 10.1111/josh.13285. PubMed PMID:36370006 PubMed Central PMC9878248
  7. Rehman, M, Gonzalez, LN, Shendell, DG. Introducing high school students to human rights to help promote environmental justice and health: An example from NJ and NYC. Explore (NY). 2022;18 (5):621-623. doi: 10.1016/j.explore.2022.06.017. PubMed PMID:35989237
  8. Aggarwal, J, Gichura, MW, Campbell, MLF, Nguyen, KT, Shendell, DG. COVID-19 School vs. Community-Based Outbreak Trends among New Jersey K-12 Schools during the 2020-2021 School Year. Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2022;19 (15):. doi: 10.3390/ijerph19159285. PubMed PMID:35954643 PubMed Central PMC9367846
  9. Black, L, Li, K, Shendell, DG. Expanding awareness of climate change, sustainability, and environmental health through an introductory short online course for high school students. Explore (NY). 2022;18 (3):381-383. doi: 10.1016/j.explore.2022.03.006. PubMed PMID:35379587
  10. Gonzalez, LN, Shendell, DG, Campbell, MLF. Adolescent empowerment through occupational rights, safety and health education: An online asynchronous course for secondary school students including young immigrant and refugee workers. Explore (NY). 2021;17 (5):479-480. doi: 10.1016/j.explore.2021.06.007. PubMed PMID:34238690
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Photo of Patrick Sinko Ph.D.
Patrick Sinko, Ph.D.
Distinguished Professor and Associate Vice President for Research Rutgers University, Ernest Mario School of PharmacyEOHSI – Toxicology

Research Areas

Drug delivery and targeting with an emphasis on AIDS, cancer, and chemical counterterrorism, biomaterials, hydrogels and nanocarriers, mechanism-based pharmacokinetics and biopharmaceutics; transport and metabolism, and bioavailability.

Research Highlights

Dr. Sinko’s research is focused on the mechanisms and applications of biopharmaceutics and polymers to drug delivery and targeting. His laboratory is located in the Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy. His group’s research efforts focus on the design, fabrication and evaluation of molecular-scale drug and diagnostic delivery technologies applied broadly to asthma, AIDS, cancer, and chemical counterterrorism. Dr. Sinko’s research efforts have been continuously supported by the National Institutes of Health, various nonprofit organizations and the Pharmaceutical and Biotech industries.

The research group is organized into therapeutic areas focusing on AIDS, cancer, and chemical counter-terrorism. Drug delivery at the molecular scale (i.e., nano) using biodegradable and biocompatible polymer platforms is a central theme. The scope of current projects includes a molecular mechanistic component, chemical design and synthesis, and biological and efficacy characterization (in vitro, in situ, and in vivo) with an emphasis on translation from concept to clinic.

Scholarly Activities

  • 2006 MERIT (Method to Extend Research in Time) Award, National Institutes of Health, for grant: Enhancing Intestinal & Brain Uptake of Anti-AIDS Drugs (R37 AI/DK-51214). The NIH awards MERIT status “to a select number of funded investigators (<5%) who have demonstrated superior competence, outstanding productivity during their previous research endeavors and are leaders in their field with paradigm-shifting ideas. The MERIT award runs through 2016.
  • 2003 Parke-Davis Endowed Chair in Pharmaceutics and Drug Delivery, School of Pharmacy, Rutgers University.
  • 2003 elected Fellow, American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists, (Alexandria, VA).
  • 1999 Gallo Award for Outstanding Cancer Research (with Drs. F.R. Luo, E. Rubin and A.K. Lalloo, and P.V. Paranjpe).
  • 1997 Gallo Award for Outstanding Cancer Research (with Drs. E. Gupta, T. Cook, and E. Rubin).
  • 1997 Controlled Release Society, Inc., CRS-Dow Corning Recognition Award for Excellence in Guiding Graduate Student Research.
  • 1995 Hoechst Celanese Innovative Research Award.
  • 1994 Outstanding Teacher of the Year, Rutgers College Parents Association, Rutgers University.
  • 1993 American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists (AAPS) Young Investigator Grant in Pharmaceutics and the Pharmaceutical Technologies.
  • 1992 Eli Lilly Young Investigator Award in Pharmaceutics.
  • 1992 Burroughs Welcome Fund New Investigator Award, American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy.

Recent Publications

  1. Roldan, TL, Li, S, Guillon, C, Heindel, ND, Laskin, JD, Lee, IH, Gao, D, Sinko, PJ. Optimizing Nanosuspension Drug Release and Wound Healing Using a Design of Experiments Approach: Improving the Drug Delivery Potential of NDH-4338 for Treating Chemical Burns. Pharmaceutics. 2024;16 (4):. doi: 10.3390/pharmaceutics16040471. PubMed PMID:38675132 PubMed Central PMC11053863
  2. Roldan, TL, Li, S, Laskin, JD, Gao, D, Sinko, PJ. Depilatory double-disc mouse model for evaluation of vesicant dermal injury pharmacotherapy countermeasures. Animal Model Exp Med. 2023;6 (1):57-65. doi: 10.1002/ame2.12304. PubMed PMID:36872306 PubMed Central PMC9986227
  3. Joseph, LB, Gordon, MK, Zhou, P, Hahn, RA, Lababidi, H, Croutch, CR, Sinko, PJ, Heck, DE, Laskin, DL, Laskin, JD et al.. Sulfur mustard corneal injury is associated with alterations in the epithelial basement membrane and stromal extracellular matrix. Exp Mol Pathol. 2022;128 :104807. doi: 10.1016/j.yexmp.2022.104807. PubMed PMID:35798063 PubMed Central PMC10044521
  4. Sandhu, SK, Kumar, S, Raut, J, Singh, M, Kaur, S, Sharma, G, Roldan, TL, Trehan, S, Holloway, J, Wahler, G et al.. Systematic Development and Characterization of Novel, High Drug-Loaded, Photostable, Curcumin Solid Lipid Nanoparticle Hydrogel for Wound Healing. Antioxidants (Basel). 2021;10 (5):. doi: 10.3390/antiox10050725. PubMed PMID:34063003 PubMed Central PMC8148018
  5. Al-Zubaydi, F, Gao, D, Kakkar, D, Li, S, Holloway, J, Szekely, Z, Chan, N, Kumar, S, Sabaawy, HE, Love, S et al.. Breast intraductal nanoformulations for treating ductal carcinoma in situ II: Dose de-escalation using a slow releasing/slow bioconverting prodrug strategy. Drug Deliv Transl Res. 2022;12 (1):240-256. doi: 10.1007/s13346-021-00903-y. PubMed PMID:33590464
  6. Wilson, BK, Sinko, PJ, Prud'homme, RK. Encapsulation and Controlled Release of a Camptothecin Prodrug from Nanocarriers and Microgels: Tuning Release Rate with Nanocarrier Excipient Composition. Mol Pharm. 2021;18 (3):1093-1101. doi: 10.1021/acs.molpharmaceut.0c01012. PubMed PMID:33440941
  7. Laskin, JD, Wahler, G, Croutch, CR, Sinko, PJ, Laskin, DL, Heck, DE, Joseph, LB. Skin remodeling and wound healing in the Gottingen minipig following exposure to sulfur mustard. Exp Mol Pathol. 2020;115 :104470. doi: 10.1016/j.yexmp.2020.104470. PubMed PMID:32445752 PubMed Central PMC7374066
  8. Al-Zubaydi, F, Gao, D, Kakkar, D, Li, S, Adler, D, Holloway, J, Szekely, Z, Gu, Z, Chan, N, Kumar, S et al.. Breast intraductal nanoformulations for treating ductal carcinoma in situ I: Exploring metal-ion complexation to slow ciclopirox release, enhance mammary persistence and efficacy. J Control Release. 2020;323 :71-82. doi: 10.1016/j.jconrel.2020.04.016. PubMed PMID:32302762
  9. Chen, P, Zhang, X, Venosa, A, Lee, IH, Myers, D, Holloway, JA, Prud'homme, RK, Gao, D, Szekely, Z, Laskin, JD et al.. A Novel Bivalent Mannosylated Targeting Ligand Displayed on Nanoparticles Selectively Targets Anti-Inflammatory M2 Macrophages. Pharmaceutics. 2020;12 (3):. doi: 10.3390/pharmaceutics12030243. PubMed PMID:32182675 PubMed Central PMC7150811
  10. Gu, Z, Al-Zubaydi, F, Adler, D, Li, S, Johnson, S, Prasad, P, Holloway, J, Szekely, Z, Love, S, Gao, D et al.. Evaluation of intraductal delivery of poly(ethylene glycol)-doxorubicin conjugate nanocarriers for the treatment of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS)-like lesions in rats. J Interdiscip Nanomed. 2018;3 (3):146-159. doi: 10.1002/jin2.51. PubMed PMID:30443411 PubMed Central PMC6220801
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Photo of Thant Soe Ph.D.
Thant Soe, Ph.D.
Postdoctoral Fellow Rutgers UniversityEOHSI -Toxicology
Brenda Sookhram
Rutgers UniversityEOHSI – Clinical Research and Occupational Medicine
Photo of David Souren MCP, CompTIA Network+
David Souren, MCP, CompTIA Network+
Unit Computing Specialist Rutgers UniversityEOHSI – Central Administration/Network Services
Photo of Phoebe Stapleton Ph.D., A.T.C.
Phoebe Stapleton, Ph.D., A.T.C.
Associate Professor Rutgers University-Ernest Mario School of PharmacyEOHSI- Toxicology

Dr. Stapleton is an Assistant Professor in the Rutgers University, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, and the Joint Graduate Program in Toxicology. She received her B.S. in Biology and Athletic Training from State University of New York (SUNY) College at Cortland, a M.S.Ed. in Kinesiology from Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville, and a Ph.D. in Exercise Physiology from West Virginia University. She completed her postdoctoral training within the Department of Physiology and Pharmacology at West Virginia University.

Research Areas

The microcirculation branch of the cardiovascular system encompasses the arterioles, capillaries, and venules within an organ or tissue of interest. These highly active vessels serve to maintain homeostasis by regulating blood flow and tissue perfusion, thus providing nutrients and removing waste. Central to proper reactivity is the health and function of the endothelium, a single cell layer lining the vasculature. The Stapleton laboratory investigates the microvascular perturbations associated with normal physiological challenges (exercise or pregnancy), disease, and exposures to environmental and/or occupational xenobiotics.

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Using engineered nanomaterials, studies focus on the question: how can something we inhale affect the cardiovascular system? Recently, her research group has investigated non-traditional models of exposure by incorporating reproductive toxicology. These studies focus on exposures during pregnancy leading to the development of a hostile gestational environment identified through microvascular evaluations of the mother. These prenatal exposures impact fetal development and may predispose future generations to cardiovascular aberrations. The Stapleton laboratory is funded by a NIEHS ONES award, NIH R01 ES031285.

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Research Highlights

  • Identified and visualized nanoplastic particles are able to translocate from the maternal lungs to the fetal tissues after pulmonary exposure in late pregnancy.
  • Development of a novel placental perfusion technique to quantify material transfer from the maternal uterine circulation to the fetal umbilical circulation and measure biomarkers of uteroplacental function.
  • Identification of the development of a hostile gestational environment after engineered nanomaterial exposure during pregnancy.
  • Development of a novel intravital microscopy technique to visualize the vasculature of the pregnant uterus.
  • Investigations of mitochondrial function and bioenergetics in young exposed to xenobiotic matter during gestation.
  • Identification of microvascular dysfunction and behavioral alterations associated with engineered nanomaterial exposure in gestation.
  • Inhaled micro- and nanoplastic particles (MNP) aerosols were found to alter inflammatory, cardiovascular, and endocrine activity in virgin female Sprague-Dawley rats.
  • Identified and visualized micro- and nanoplastic particles that have translocated from the maternal lungs or GI system to the fetal tissues 24h after pulmonary or gastric exposure, respectively, in late pregnancy.”

Awards

 

  • Dr. Stapleton received the Outstanding New Environmental Scientist (ONES) Award from NIEHS.
  • Dr. Stapleton was awarded the Society of Toxicology (SOT) Achievement Award (2024)
  • Ms. Chelsea Cary’s manuscript (Single inhalation exposure to polyamide micro and nanoplastic particles impairs vascular dilation without generating pulmonary inflammation in virgin female Sprague Dawley rats) was awarded the Impact Award for the Cardiovascular Toxicology Specialty Section and the Best Manuscript Award for the Occupational and Public Health Specialty Section of SOT (2024)
  • Laboratory publication, Ingested polystyrene micro-nanoplastics (MNPs) translate to placenta and fetal tissues in pregnant rats identified as top 1% of NIEHS papers published in 2023″
  • Ms. Chelsea Cary awarded the Rutgers School of Graduate Studies Aaron Shatkin Graduate Award (2023)
  • Ms. Talia Seymore was a finalist for the Trophoblast Research New Investigator Award, International Federation of Placental Association (IFPA) (2023)
  • Ms. Chelsea Cary was awarded a Kirschstein-NRSA (F31) from NIEHS (2023)
  • Ms. Chelsea Cary and Talia Seymore were each awarded a Diversity Initiatives Career Development Award from SOT to attend the IFPA meetings, individually (2023)
  • Dr. Stapleton was awarded the Women in Toxicology (WIT) Outstanding Young Investigator award (2023)
  • Laboratory publication, Maternal, placental, and fetal distribution of titanium after repeated titanium dioxide nanoparticle inhalation through pregnancy identified as top 1% of NIEHS papers published in 2022
  • Mr. Andrés D. Rivera Ruiz was awarded the SOT Undergraduate Diversity Award in 2021 for his work as an 2020 Virtual SURF trainee.
  • Ms. Chelsea Cary won the 2021 Graduate Student Trainee Award from the Cardiovascular Toxicology Specialty Section of the Society of Toxicology (SOT).
  • Dr. Stapleton received the 2021 New Career Scientist Award from the Reproductive and Developmental Toxicology Specialty Section of the Society of Toxicology (SOT).
  • Dr. Stapleton received the 2020 Young Investigator Award from the Inhalation and Respiratory Toxicology Specialty Section of the Society of Toxicology (SOT).
  • Invited speaker to the NIEHS 50th Anniversary Celebration with SOT titled SOT and NIEHS Past, Present, and Future: 50 Years of Collaboration.
  • Past-President of the Allegheny-Erie Regional Chapter of the Society of Toxicology.
  • Dr. Stapleton recently published a symposia review of Gestational Nanomaterial Exposures in the Journal of Physiology (2016) 594(8):2161-73. (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26332609)
  • Dr. Stapleton has been awarded the Impact Award by the Cardiovascular Toxicology Specialty Section of SOT (2016), the Best Publication Award by the Nanotoxicology Specialty Section of SOT (2016), and the Best Postdoctoral Publication Award by the Postdoctoral Assembly of SOT (2014).
  • Appointed as Review Editor for Frontiers in Vascular Physiology (2012).

In the News

 

Recent Publications

  1. Cary, CM, Fournier, SB, Adams, S, Wang, X, Yurkow, EJ, Stapleton, PA. Single pulmonary nanopolystyrene exposure in late-stage pregnancy dysregulates maternal and fetal cardiovascular function. Toxicol Sci. 2024;199 (1):149-159. doi: 10.1093/toxsci/kfae019. PubMed PMID:38366927 PubMed Central PMC11057520
  2. Qian, N, Gao, X, Lang, X, Deng, H, Bratu, TM, Chen, Q, Stapleton, P, Yan, B, Min, W. Rapid single-particle chemical imaging of nanoplastics by SRS microscopy. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2024;121 (3):e2300582121. doi: 10.1073/pnas.2300582121. PubMed PMID:38190543 PubMed Central PMC10801917
  3. Adams, S, Stapleton, PA. Nanoparticles at the maternal-fetal interface. Mol Cell Endocrinol. 2023;578 :112067. doi: 10.1016/j.mce.2023.112067. PubMed PMID:37689342 PubMed Central PMC10591848
  4. Stapleton, PA. The Application of Engineered Nanomaterials in Perinatal Therapeutics. Small. 2023; :e2303072. doi: 10.1002/smll.202303072. PubMed PMID:37438678 PubMed Central PMC10784409
  5. Cary, C, Stapleton, P. Determinants and mechanisms of inorganic nanoparticle translocation across mammalian biological barriers. Arch Toxicol. 2023;97 (8):2111-2131. doi: 10.1007/s00204-023-03528-x. PubMed PMID:37303009 PubMed Central PMC10540313
  6. Cary, CM, Seymore, TN, Singh, D, Vayas, KN, Goedken, MJ, Adams, S, Polunas, M, Sunil, VR, Laskin, DL, Demokritou, P et al.. Single inhalation exposure to polyamide micro and nanoplastic particles impairs vascular dilation without generating pulmonary inflammation in virgin female Sprague Dawley rats. Part Fibre Toxicol. 2023;20 (1):16. doi: 10.1186/s12989-023-00525-x. PubMed PMID:37088832 PubMed Central PMC10122824
  7. Cary, CM, DeLoid, GM, Yang, Z, Bitounis, D, Polunas, M, Goedken, MJ, Buckley, B, Cheatham, B, Stapleton, PA, Demokritou, P et al.. Ingested Polystyrene Nanospheres Translocate to Placenta and Fetal Tissues in Pregnant Rats: Potential Health Implications. Nanomaterials (Basel). 2023;13 (4):. doi: 10.3390/nano13040720. PubMed PMID:36839088 PubMed Central PMC9965230
  8. Bowdridge, EC, Thompson, J, Bourque, S, Stapleton, P. Editorial: Getting to the heart of developmental toxicities. Front Toxicol. 2023;5 :1138470. doi: 10.3389/ftox.2023.1138470. PubMed PMID:36726487 PubMed Central PMC9886310
  9. Halvorson, BD, Menon, NJ, Goldman, D, Frisbee, SJ, Goodwill, AG, Butcher, JT, Stapleton, PA, Brooks, SD, d'Audiffret, AC, Wiseman, RW et al.. The development of peripheral microvasculopathy with chronic metabolic disease in obese Zucker rats: a retrograde emergence?. Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol. 2022;323 (3):H475-H489. doi: 10.1152/ajpheart.00264.2022. PubMed PMID:35904886 PubMed Central PMC9448278
  10. Seymore, TN, Rivera-Núñez, Z, Stapleton, PA, Adibi, JJ, Barrett, ES. Phthalate Exposures and Placental Health in Animal Models and Humans: A Systematic Review. Toxicol Sci. 2022;188 (2):153-179. doi: 10.1093/toxsci/kfac060. PubMed PMID:35686923 PubMed Central PMC9333406
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  1. Engler-Chiurazzi EB, Stapleton PA, Stalnaker JJ, Rambo-Hernandez KE, Sarkar SN, Jun S, Quintana DD, Ren X, Hu Heng, Nurkiewicz TR, McBride CR, Yi J, Simpkins JW. Adult Behavioral Consequences of Prenatal Engineered Nanomaterial Exposure in Rodents. Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health Part A. 2016; 79(11): 447-52. doi: 10.1080/15287394.2016.1164101.
  2. Stapleton PA. Gestational xenobiotic exposures: microvascular implications for the past, present, and future. Journal of Physiology. Apr; 594(8): 2161-73, 2016. (invited symposium review) doi: 10.1113/JP270581.
  3. Stapleton PA, Nichols CE, Yi J, McBride CR, Minarchick VC, Shepherd DL, Hollander JM, Nurkiewicz TR. Microvascular and mitochondrial dysfunction in the female F1 generation after gestational TiO2 nanoparticle exposure. Nanotoxicology. 2015 Nov;9(8): 941-51. doi: 10.3109/17435390.2014.984251.
  4. Nichols CE, Shepherd DL, Knuckles TL, Thapa D, Stricker JC, Stapleton PA, Minarchick VC, Alway SE, Nurkiewicz TR, Hollander JM. Cardiac and Mitochondrial Dysfunction Following Acute Pulmonary Exposure to Mountaintop Removal Mining Particulate Matter. American Journal of Physiology – Heart and Circulatory Physiology. Dec; 309(12): H2017-30, 2015. doi: 10.1152/ajpheart.00353.2015.
  5. Stapleton PA, McBride CR, Yi J, Nurkiewicz TR. Uterine microvascular sensitivity to nanomaterial inhalation: an in vivo assessment. Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology. Nov; 288(3): 420-8, 2015. doi: 10.1016/j.taap.2015.08.013
  6. Stapleton PA, Minarchick VC, Yi J, Engels K, McBride CR, Nurkiewicz TR. Maternal engineered nanomaterial exposure and fetal microvascular function: does the Barker hypothesis apply? Am J Obstet Gynecol. Sep; 209(3): 227.e1-227.e11, 2013. doi: 10.1016/j.ajog.2013.04.036.
  7. Stapleton PA, Minarchick VC, Cumpston AM, McKinney W, Chen BT, Sager TM, Frazer DG, Mercer RR, Scabilloni J, Andrew M, Castranova V, Nurkiewicz TR. Impairment of coronary arteriolar endothelium-dependent dilation after multiwalled-carbon nanotube inhalation: a time course study. IJMS. Oct; 13: 13781-13803, 2012. doi: 10.3390/ijms131113781.
  8. Stapleton PA, Minarchick V, Knuckles TL, Nurkiewicz TR. Xenobiotic Particle Exposure and Microvascular Endpoints: A Call to Arms. Microcirculation. Feb; 19(2):126-42, 2012. doi: 10.1111/j.1549-8719.2011.00137.x.
Photo of Patricia Starke RN
Patricia Starke, RN
Nurse Case Manager Rutgers UniversityEOHSI Clinical Research and Occupational Medicine – World Trade Center
Photo of Jodi Streich Ph.D.
Jodi Streich, Ph.D.
Mental Health Director – World Trade Center Clinical Center of Excellence Rutgers UniversityEOHSI- Clinical Research and Occupational Medicine
Photo of Vasanthi Sunil Ph.D.
Vasanthi Sunil, Ph.D.
Associate Research Professor Rutgers University, Ernest Mario School of PharmacyEOHSI – Toxicology

Research Interests

  • Mechanisms of pulmonary inflammation and repair
  • Effects of bacterial toxins, environmental pollutants and chemical warfare toxicants on lung function and gene regulation
  • Age-associated alterations in signaling pathways in the lung

Awards and Honors

  • 2003 New Jersey Cancer Research Award for Scientific Excellenc

Recent Publications

  1. Malaviya, R, Meshanni, JA, Sunil, VR, Venosa, A, Guo, C, Abramova, EV, Vayas, KN, Jiang, C, Cervelli, JA, Gow, AJ et al.. Role of macrophage bioenergetics in N-acetylcysteine-mediated mitigation of lung injury and oxidative stress induced by nitrogen mustard. Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 2024;485 :116908. doi: 10.1016/j.taap.2024.116908. PubMed PMID:38513841
  2. Cary, CM, Seymore, TN, Singh, D, Vayas, KN, Goedken, MJ, Adams, S, Polunas, M, Sunil, VR, Laskin, DL, Demokritou, P et al.. Single inhalation exposure to polyamide micro and nanoplastic particles impairs vascular dilation without generating pulmonary inflammation in virgin female Sprague Dawley rats. Part Fibre Toxicol. 2023;20 (1):16. doi: 10.1186/s12989-023-00525-x. PubMed PMID:37088832 PubMed Central PMC10122824
  3. Sunil, VR, Vayas, KN, Radbel, J, Abramova, E, Gow, A, Laskin, JD, Laskin, DL. Impaired energy metabolism and altered functional activity of alveolar type II epithelial cells following exposure of rats to nitrogen mustard. Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 2022;456 :116257. doi: 10.1016/j.taap.2022.116257. PubMed PMID:36174670
  4. Carnino, JM, Lee, H, Smith, LC, Sunil, VR, Rancourt, RC, Vayas, K, Cervelli, J, Kwok, ZH, Ni, K, Laskin, JD et al.. Microvesicle-Derived miRNAs Regulate Proinflammatory Macrophage Activation in the Lung Following Ozone Exposure. Toxicol Sci. 2022;187 (1):162-174. doi: 10.1093/toxsci/kfac025. PubMed PMID:35201360 PubMed Central PMC9041552
  5. Malaviya, R, Bellomo, A, Abramova, E, Croutch, CR, Roseman, J, Tuttle, R, Peters, E, Casillas, RP, Sunil, VR, Laskin, JD et al.. Pulmonary injury and oxidative stress in rats induced by inhaled sulfur mustard is ameliorated by anti-tumor necrosis factor-α antibody. Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 2021;428 :115677. doi: 10.1016/j.taap.2021.115677. PubMed PMID:34390737 PubMed Central PMC8452183
  6. Malaviya, R, Abramova, EV, Rancourt, RC, Sunil, VR, Napierala, M, Weinstock, D, Croutch, CR, Roseman, J, Tuttle, R, Peters, E et al.. Progressive Lung Injury, Inflammation, and Fibrosis in Rats Following Inhalation of Sulfur Mustard. Toxicol Sci. 2020;178 (2):358-374. doi: 10.1093/toxsci/kfaa150. PubMed PMID:33002157 PubMed Central PMC7751178
  7. Sunil, VR, Vayas, KN, Abramova, EV, Rancourt, R, Cervelli, JA, Malaviya, R, Goedken, M, Venosa, A, Gow, AJ, Laskin, JD et al.. Lung injury, oxidative stress and fibrosis in mice following exposure to nitrogen mustard. Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 2020;387 :114798. doi: 10.1016/j.taap.2019.114798. PubMed PMID:31678244 PubMed Central PMC7066865
  8. Sunil, VR, Radbel, J, Hussain, S, Vayas, KN, Cervelli, J, Deen, M, Kipen, H, Udasin, I, Laumbach, R, Sunderram, J et al.. Sarcoid-Like Granulomatous Disease: Pathologic Case Series in World Trade Center Dust Exposed Rescue and Recovery Workers. Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2019;16 (5):. doi: 10.3390/ijerph16050815. PubMed PMID:30845693 PubMed Central PMC6427752
  9. Sunil, VR, Vayas, KN, Cervelli, JA, Ebramova, EV, Gow, AJ, Goedken, M, Malaviya, R, Laskin, JD, Laskin, DL. Protective Role of Surfactant Protein-D Against Lung Injury and Oxidative Stress Induced by Nitrogen Mustard. Toxicol Sci. 2018;166 (1):108-122. doi: 10.1093/toxsci/kfy188. PubMed PMID:30060251 PubMed Central PMC6204765
  10. Sunil, VR, Vayas, KN, Fang, M, Zarbl, H, Massa, C, Gow, AJ, Cervelli, JA, Kipen, H, Laumbach, RJ, Lioy, PJ et al.. World Trade Center (WTC) dust exposure in mice is associated with inflammation, oxidative stress and epigenetic changes in the lung. Exp Mol Pathol. 2017;102 (1):50-58. doi: 10.1016/j.yexmp.2016.12.005. PubMed PMID:27986442 PubMed Central PMC5472054
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Deborah Thurston, RN
Nurse Case Manager – WTC RutgersEOHSI- Clinical Research and Occupational Medicine
Photo of Jay A Tischfield Ph.D.
Jay A Tischfield, Ph.D.
Distinguished Professor Rutgers University, School of Arts and SciencesEOHSI – Toxicology

Research Areas

Broadly, our research centers around human heredity and the somatic cell biology of mutations that produce disease. Our interests encompass psychiatric genetics, addiction biology and mechanisms of gene regulation and include the production of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) and engineered mouse genetic models for disease as key tools to understand biological mechanisms.

Research Highlights

One research focus is Tourette disorder (TD), a neuropsychiatric condition that is characterized by verbal and motor tics and which is observed in about 1 in 150 children. We have analyzed inherited, disease-producing genetic variants of specific genes in large TD families using neurons derived from iPSCs and molecular genetics tools. In contrast, our “TIC Genetics” collaborative group has discovered and is now characterizing new gene mutations that have arisen in the TD children of unaffected parents. We aim to understand how these gene variants function on a cellular level by comparing iPSC-derived neurons from affected and unaffected individuals. At the same time, we hope to model TD behavior, neuroanatomy and neurophysiology with mice engineered to have mutations identical to those that we have discovered in TD humans.

Other research foci include collaborative research on the genetics and functional mechanisms of alcohol abuse and cellular opioid responses. We also continue with loss of heterozygosity (LOH) experiments to determine what features along the mitotic chromosome promote recombination that results in LOH. Additional lab projects include development of drugs to treat cystinuria, a disease characterized by painful, recurrent cystine kidney stones, using an engineered mouse model for cystinuria.

Recent Publications

Cross-Disorder Group of the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium. Electronic address:  lee0@mgh.harvard.edu; Cross-Disorder Group of the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium. (606 Collaborators.) Genomic Relationships, Novel Loci, and Pleiotropic Mechanisms across Eight Psychiatric Disorders. Cell. 2019 Dec 12;179(7):1469-1482.e11. doi: 10.1016/j.cell.2019.11.020.

Salvatore JE, Barr PB, Stephenson M, Aliev F, Kuo SI, Su J, Agrawal A, Almasy L, Bierut L, Bucholz K, Chan G, Edenberg HJ, Johnson EC, McCutcheon VV, Meyers JL, Schuckit M, Tischfield J, Wetherill L, Dick DM.  Sibling comparisons elucidate the associations between educational attainment polygenic scores and alcohol, nicotine and cannabis. Addiction. 2019 Oct 28. doi: 10.1111/add.14815. [Epub ahead of print]

Meyers JL, Chorlian DB, Johnson EC, Pandey AK, Kamarajan C, Salvatore JE, Aliev F, Subbie-Saenz de Viteri S, Zhang J, Chao M, Kapoor M, Hesselbrock V, Kramer J, Kuperman S, Nurnberger J, Tischfield J, Goate A, Foroud T, Dick DM, Edenberg HJ, Agrawal A, Porjesz B.  Association of Polygenic Liability for Alcohol Dependence and EEG Connectivity in Adolescence and Young Adulthood.  Brain Sci. 2019 Oct 17;9(10). pii: E280. doi: 10.3390/brainsci9100280.

Halikere A, Popova D, Scarnati MS, Hamod A, Swerdel MR, Moore JC, Tischfield JA, Hart RP, Pang ZP. Addiction associated N40D mu-opioid receptor variant modulates synaptic function in human neurons.  Mol Psychiatry. 2019 Sep 3. doi: 10.1038/s41380-019-0507-0. [Epub ahead of print]

Rao X, Thapa KS, Chen AB, Lin H, Gao H, Reiter JL, Hargreaves KA, Ipe J, Lai D, Xuei X, Wang Y, Gu H, Kapoor M, Farris SP, Tischfield J, Foroud T, Goate AM, Skaar TC, Mayfield RD, Edenberg HJ, Liu Y.  Allele-specific expression and high-throughput reporter assay reveal functional genetic variants associated with alcohol use disorders.  Mol Psychiatry. 2019 Sep 2. doi: 10.1038/s41380-019-0508-z. [Epub ahead of print]

Lai D, Wetherill L, Kapoor M, Johnson EC, Schwandt M, Ramchandani VA, Goldman D, Joslyn G, Rao X, Liu Y, Farris S, Mayfield RD, Dick D, Hesselbrock V, Kramer J, McCutcheon VV, Nurnberger J, Tischfield J, Goate A, Edenberg HJ, Porjesz B, Agrawal A, Foroud T, Schuckit M.  Genome-wide association studies of the self-rating of effects of ethanol (SRE).  Addict Biol. 2019 Jul 3:e12800. doi: 10.1111/adb.12800. [Epub ahead of print]

Vazquez BN, Thackray JK, Simonet NG, Chahar S, Kane-Goldsmith N, Newkirk SJ, Lee S, Xing J, Verzi MP, An W, Vaquero A, Tischfield JA, Serrano L.  SIRT7 mediates L1 elements transcriptional repression and their association with the nuclear lamina.  Nucleic Acids Res. 2019 Sep 5;47(15):7870-7885. doi: 10.1093/nar/gkz519. PMCID: PMC6735864.

Woodard LE, Welch RC, Veach RA, Beckermann TM, Sha F, Weinman EJ, Ikizler TA, Tischfield JA, Sahota A, Wilson MH.  Metabolic consequences of cystinuria.  BMC Nephrol. 2019 Jun 20;20(1):227. doi: 10.1186/s12882-019-1417-8.  PMCID:  PMC6585015

Wetherill L, Lai D, Johnson EC, Anokhin A, Bauer L, Bucholz KK, Dick DM, Hariri AR, Hesselbrock V, Kamarajan C, Kramer J, Kuperman S, Meyers JL, Nurnberger JI Jr, Schuckit M, Scott DM, Taylor RE, Tischfield J, Porjesz B, Goate AM, Edenberg HJ, Foroud T, Bogdan R, Agrawal A.  Genome-wide association study identifies loci associated with liability to alcohol and drug dependence that is associated with variability in reward-related ventral striatum activity in African- and European-Americans.  Genes Brain Behav. 2019 Jul;18(6):e12580. doi: 10.1111/gbb.12580. Epub 2019 Jun 11.

Lai D, Wetherill L, Bertelsen S, Carey CE, Kamarajan C, Kapoor M, Meyers JL, Anokhin AP, Bennett DA, Bucholz KK, Chang KK, De Jager PL, Dick DM, Hesselbrock V, Kramer J, Kuperman S, Nurnberger JI Jr, Raj T, Schuckit M, Scott DM, Taylor RE, Tischfield J, Hariri AR, Edenberg HJ, Agrawal A, Bogdan R, Porjesz B, Goate AM, Foroud T.  Genome-wide association studies of alcohol dependence, DSM-IV criterion count and individual criteria.  Genes Brain Behav. 2019 Jul;18(6):e12579. doi: 10.1111/gbb.12579. Epub 2019 Jun 4. PMCID:  PMC6612573

Aijaz A, Li M, Smith D, Khong D, LeBlon C, Fenton OS, Olabisi RM, Libutti S, Tischfield J, Maus MV, Deans R, Barcia RN, Anderson DG, Ritz J, Preti R, Parekkadan B.  Biomanufacturing for clinically advanced cell therapies.  Nat Biomed Eng. 2018 Jun;2(6):362-376. doi: 10.1038/s41551-018-0246-6. Epub 2018 Jun 11. Review. PMCID:  PMC6594100

Yu D, Sul JH, Tsetsos F, Nawaz MS, Huang AY, Zelaya I, Illmann C, Osiecki L, Darrow SM, Hirschtritt ME, Greenberg E, Muller-Vahl KR, Stuhrmann M, Dion Y, Rouleau G, Aschauer H, Stamenkovic M, Schlögelhofer M, Sandor P, Barr CL, Grados M, Singer HS, Nöthen MM, Hebebrand J, Hinney A, King RA, Fernandez TV, Barta C, Tarnok Z, Nagy P, Depienne C, Worbe Y, Hartmann A, Budman CL, Rizzo R, Lyon GJ, McMahon WM, Batterson JR, Cath DC, Malaty IA, Okun MS, Berlin C, Woods DW, Lee PC, Jankovic J, Robertson MM, Gilbert DL, Brown LW, Coffey BJ, Dietrich A, Hoekstra PJ, Kuperman S, Zinner SH, Luðvigsson P, Sæmundsen E, Thorarensen Ó, Atzmon G, Barzilai N, Wagner M, Moessner R, Ophoff R, Pato CN, Pato MT, Knowles JA, Roffman JL, Smoller JW, Buckner RL, Willsey AJ, Tischfield JA, Heiman GA, Stefansson H, Stefansson K, Posthuma D, Cox NJ, Pauls DL, Freimer NB, Neale BM, Davis LK, Paschou P, Coppola G, Mathews CA, Scharf JM; Tourette Association of America International Consortium for Genetics, the Gilles de la Tourette GWAS Replication Initiative, the Tourette International Collaborative Genetics Study, and the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium Tourette Syndrome Working Group.  Interrogating the Genetic Determinants of Tourette’s Syndrome and Other Tic Disorders Through Genome-Wide Association Studies.  Am J Psychiatry. 2019 Mar 1;176(3):217-227. doi: 10.1176/appi.ajp.2018.18070857.

Kapoor M, Wang JC, Farris SP, Liu Y, McClintick J, Gupta I, Meyers JL, Bertelsen S, Chao M, Nurnberger J, Tischfield J, Harari O, Zeran L, Hesselbrock V, Bauer L, Raj T, Porjesz B, Agrawal A, Foroud T, Edenberg HJ, Mayfield RD, Goate A. Analysis of whole genome-transcriptomic organization in brain to identify genes associated with alcoholism.  Transl Psychiatry. 2019 Feb 14;9(1):89. doi: 10.1038/s41398-019-0384-y. PMCID:  PMC6376002

Tabakin AL, Sadimin ET, Tereshchenko I, Kareddula A, Stein MN, Mayer T, Hirshfield KM, Kim IY, Tischfield J, DiPaola RS, Singer EA.  Correlation of Prostate Cancer CHD1 Status with Response to Androgen Deprivation Therapy: a Pilot Study.  J Genitourin Disord. 2018;2(1). pii: 1006. Epub 2018 Jul 31. PMCID: PMC6358174

McClintick JN, Tischfield JA, Deng L, Kapoor M, Xuei X, Edenberg HJ.  Ethanol Activates Immune Response In Lymphoblastoid Cells.  Alcohol. 2019 Jan 9;79:81-91. doi: 10.1016/j.alcohol.2019.01.001. [Epub ahead of print] PMCID:  PMC6616005

Wang S, Mandell JD, Kumar Y, Sun N, Morris MT, Arbelaez J, Nasello C, Dong S, Duhn C, Zhao X, Yang Z, Padmanabhuni SS, Yu D, King RA, Dietrich A, Khalifa N, Dahl N, Huang AY, Neale BM, Coppola G, Mathews CA, Scharf JM; Tourette International Collaborative Genetics Study (TIC Genetics); Tourette Syndrome Genetics Southern and Eastern Europe Initiative (TSGENESEE); Tourette Association of America International Consortium for Genetics (TAAICG), Fernandez TV, Buxbaum JD, De Rubeis S, Grice DE, Xing J, Heiman GA, Tischfield JA, Paschou P, Willsey AJ, State MW.  De Novo Sequence and Copy Number Variants Are Strongly Associated with Tourette Disorder and Implicate Cell Polarity in Pathogenesis.  Cell Rep. 2018 Dec 18;25(12):3544. doi: 10.1016/j.celrep.2018.12.024. No abstract available.

Sahota A, Tischfield JA, Goldfarb DS, Ward MD, Hu L. Cystinuria: genetic aspects, mouse models, and a new approach to therapy.  Urolithiasis. 2019 Feb;47(1):57-66. doi: 10.1007/s00240-018-1101-7. Epub 2018 Dec 4. PMCID: PMC6592844

Johnson EC, Tillman R, Aliev F, Meyers JL, Salvatore JE, Anokhin AP, Dick DM, Edenberg HJ, Kramer J, Kuperman S, McCutcheon VV, Nurnberger JI Jr, Porjesz B, Schuckit M, Tischfield J, Bucholz KK, Agrawal A. Exploring the relationship between polygenic risk for cannabis use, peer cannabis use, and the longitudinal course of cannabis involvement.  Addiction. 2018 Nov 26. [Epub ahead of print]

Abdulkadir M, Mathews CA, Scharf JM, Yu D, Tischfield JA, Heiman GA, Hoekstra PJ, Dietrich A.  Polygenic Risk Scores Derived From a Tourette Syndrome Genome-wide Association Study Predict Presence of Tics in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children Cohort.  Biol Psychiatry. 2019 Feb 15;85(4):298-304. doi: 10.1016/j.biopsych.2018.09.011. Epub 2018 Sep 29. PMCID: PMC6342633

Edwards AC, Deak JD, Gizer IR, Lai D, Chatzinakos C, Wilhelmsen KP, Lindsay J, Heron J, Hickman M, Webb BT, Bacanu SA, Foroud TM, Kendler KS, Dick DM, Schuckit MA; Collaborative Study on the Genetics of Alcoholism (COGA).  Collaborators:  Porjesz B, Hesselbrock V, Edenberg H, Bierut L, Hesselbrock V, Edenberg HJ, Nurnberger J Jr, Foroud T, Liu Y, Kuperman S, Kramer J, Porjesz B, Bierut L, Rice J, Bucholz K, Agrawal A, Schuckit M, Tischfield J, Brooks A, Almasy L, Dick D, Goate A, Taylor R, Parsian A, Chen H. Meta-Analysis of Genetic Influences on Initial Alcohol Sensitivity.  Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2018 Oct 1. [Epub ahead of print]

Publicaitons via PubMed

  1. Nasello, C, Poppi, LA, Wu, J, Kowalski, TF, Thackray, JK, Wang, R, Persaud, A, Mahboob, M, Lin, S, Spaseska, R et al.. Human mutations in high-confidence Tourette disorder genes affect sensorimotor behavior, reward learning, and striatal dopamine in mice. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2024;121 (19):e2307156121. doi: 10.1073/pnas.2307156121. PubMed PMID:38683996 PubMed Central PMC11087812
  2. Chen, AB, Yu, X, Thapa, KS, Gao, H, Reiter, JL, Xuei, X, Tsai, AP, Landreth, GE, Lai, D, Wang, Y et al.. Functional 3'-UTR Variants Identify Regulatory Mechanisms Impacting Alcohol Use Disorder and Related Traits. bioRxiv. 2024; :. doi: 10.1101/2024.01.31.578270. PubMed PMID:38370821 PubMed Central PMC10871301
  3. Prytkova, I, Liu, Y, Fernando, M, Gameiro-Ros, I, Popova, D, Kamarajan, C, Xuei, X, Chorlian, DB, Edenberg, HJ, Tischfield, JA et al.. Upregulated GIRK2 Counteracts Ethanol-Induced Changes in Excitability and Respiration in Human Neurons. J Neurosci. 2024;44 (16):. doi: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.0918-23.2024. PubMed PMID:38350999 PubMed Central PMC11026340
  4. Vazquez, BN, Fernández-Duran, I, Hernandez, Y, Tarighi, S, Thackray, JK, Espinosa-Alcantud, M, Kumari, P, Ianni, A, Cesaire, L, Braun, T et al.. SIRT7 and p53 interaction in embryonic development and tumorigenesis. Front Cell Dev Biol. 2023;11 :1281730. doi: 10.3389/fcell.2023.1281730. PubMed PMID:38234684 PubMed Central PMC10791984
  5. Thomas, NS, Gillespie, NA, Chan, G, Edenberg, HJ, Kamarajan, C, Kuo, SI, Miller, AP, Nurnberger, JI Jr, Tischfield, J, Dick, DM et al.. A Developmentally-Informative Genome-wide Association Study of Alcohol Use Frequency. Behav Genet. 2024;54 (2):151-168. doi: 10.1007/s10519-023-10170-x. PubMed PMID:38108996 PubMed Central PMC10913412
  6. Wang, S, Wang, B, Drury, V, Drake, S, Sun, N, Alkhairo, H, Arbelaez, J, Duhn, C, Tourette International Collaborative Genetics (TIC Genetics), Bal, VH et al.. Rare X-linked variants carry predominantly male risk in autism, Tourette syndrome, and ADHD. Nat Commun. 2023;14 (1):8077. doi: 10.1038/s41467-023-43776-0. PubMed PMID:38057346 PubMed Central PMC10700338
  7. Su, J, Kuo, SI, Aliev, F, Rabinowitz, JA, Jamil, B, Chan, G, Edenberg, HJ, Francis, M, Hesselbrock, V, Kamarajan, C et al.. Alcohol use polygenic risk score, social support, and alcohol use among European American and African American adults. Dev Psychopathol. 2023; :1-13. doi: 10.1017/S0954579423001141. PubMed PMID:37781861 PubMed Central PMC10985050
  8. Agrawal, A, Brislin, SJ, Bucholz, KK, Dick, D, Hart, RP, Johnson, EC, Meyers, J, Salvatore, J, Slesinger, P, COGA Collaborators et al.. The Collaborative Study on the Genetics of Alcoholism: Overview. Genes Brain Behav. 2023;22 (5):e12864. doi: 10.1111/gbb.12864. PubMed PMID:37736010 PubMed Central PMC10550790
  9. Gameiro-Ros, I, Popova, D, Prytkova, I, Pang, ZP, Liu, Y, Dick, D, Bucholz, KK, Agrawal, A, Porjesz, B, Goate, AM et al.. 5. Collaborative Study on the Genetics of Alcoholism: Functional genomics. Genes Brain Behav. 2023;22 (5):e12855. doi: 10.1111/gbb.12855. PubMed PMID:37533187 PubMed Central PMC10550792
  10. Johnson, EC, Salvatore, JE, Lai, D, Merikangas, AK, Nurnberger, JI, Tischfield, JA, Xuei, X, Kamarajan, C, Wetherill, L, COGA Collaborators et al.. The collaborative study on the genetics of alcoholism: Genetics. Genes Brain Behav. 2023;22 (5):e12856. doi: 10.1111/gbb.12856. PubMed PMID:37387240 PubMed Central PMC10550788
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Photo of Christopher Uchrin Ph.D., P.E.
Christopher Uchrin, Ph.D., P.E.
Professor Rutgers University, School of Environmental and Biological SciencesEOHSI – Environmental and Population Health Bio-Sciences

Research Areas

My research involves the mathematical modeling of contaminants in aquatic ecosystems. This involves not only computer modeling but also laboratory and field studies to develop submodels that allow of parameter estimations use in the models.

Research Highlights

My research group has been involved in the development of a novel apparatus to measure Sediment Oxygen Demand (SOD) in rivers and lakes on a timely and cost effective manner. We have applied for a patent for the apparatus.

Recent Publications

  1. Miskewitz, RJ, Barone, D, Guterl, SJ, Uchrin, CG. Design of a GIS-based rating protocol to assess the potential for landfill closure using dredge material in post Hurricane Sandy New Jersey. J Environ Sci Health A Tox Hazard Subst Environ Eng. 2017;52 (6):533-538. doi: 10.1080/10934529.2017.1282773. PubMed PMID:28276886
  2. Miskewitz, RJ, Francisco, KL, Uchrin, CG. Comparison of a novel profile method to standard chamber methods for measurement of sediment oxygen demand. J Environ Sci Health A Tox Hazard Subst Environ Eng. 2010;45 (7):795-802. doi: 10.1080/10934521003708919. PubMed PMID:20397086
  3. Shirinian-Orlando, AA, Uchrin, CG. Modeling the Hydrology and water quality using BASINS/HSPF for the upper Maurice River watershed, New Jersey. J Environ Sci Health A Tox Hazard Subst Environ Eng. 2007;42 (3):289-303. doi: 10.1080/10934520601134254. PubMed PMID:17365295
  4. Otubu, JE, Hunter, JV, Francisco, KL, Uchrin, CG. Temperature effects on tubificid worms and their relation to sediment oxygen demand. J Environ Sci Health A Tox Hazard Subst Environ Eng. 2006;41 (8):1607-13. doi: 10.1080/10934520600754219. PubMed PMID:16835114
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Photo of Iris Udasin M.D.
Iris Udasin, M.D.
Professor, Medical Director EOHSI Clinical Center Rutgers University- School of Public HealthEOHSI – Clinical Research and Occupational Medicine

Research Areas

My chief area of interest is health effects of World Trade Center exposures, including aerodigestive medical effects, as well as the interaction of both physical and mental health effects and exposure to toxins. I am also interested in health issues in health care workers, laboratory workers, teachers, police officers, and fire fighters. I am interested in occupational and environmental asthma and other respiratory conditions.

Research Highlights

  • Principal investigator World trade Center Medical Monitoring and Treatment Program Longitudinal study
  • Influenza vaccine decisions
  • Effect of training to prevent work place violence

Scholarly Activities

I serve on the steering committee for World trade Center medical monitoring and treatment program. I have presented grand rounds concerning World Trade Center in statewide, national, and international forums. I serve as Director of employee health and have spoken nationally at several physician meetings.

Recent Publications

  1. Ayappa, I, Laumbach, R, Black, K, Weintraub, M, Agarwala, P, Twumasi, A, Sanders, H, Udasin, I, Harrison, D, de la Hoz, RE et al.. Nasal resistance and inflammation: mechanisms for obstructive sleep apnea from chronic rhinosinusitis. J Clin Sleep Med. 2024; :. doi: 10.5664/jcsm.11216. PubMed PMID:38888597
  2. Sunderram, J, Legard, A, De Resende, A, Black, K, Udasin, IG, Lu, SE, Romero Castillo, H, Ravi, SS, Mullins, AE, de la Hoz, RE et al.. Lack of association of impaired upper airway sensation with the presence or absence of obstructive sleep apnoea or chronic rhinosinusitis in World Trade Center responders. Occup Environ Med. 2024; :. doi: 10.1136/oemed-2023-109262. PubMed PMID:38871449
  3. Udasin, IG, Sunderram, J, Calvert, G. The World Trade Center Health Program: Obstructive sleep apnea best practices. Arch Environ Occup Health. 2023;78 (4):241-243. doi: 10.1080/19338244.2023.2195604. PubMed PMID:37017101
  4. Caruth, J, Black, K, Legard, A, De Resende, A, Getz, K, Borowski, M, Debilio, L, Brewer, A, Kipen, H, Udasin, IG et al.. Incidence and Predictors of COVID-19 Infection in Prison Healthcare Workers. J Occup Environ Med. 2023;65 (7):573-579. doi: 10.1097/JOM.0000000000002836. PubMed PMID:36882811 PubMed Central PMC10329989
  5. Lin, RA, Calvert, GM, Udasin, IG. World Trade Center Health Program best practices for the diagnosis and treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease. Arch Environ Occup Health. 2023;78 (4):236-240. doi: 10.1080/19338244.2023.2171958. PubMed PMID:36744643
  6. Calvert, GM, Anderson, K, Cochran, J, Cone, JE, Harrison, DJ, Haugen, PT, Lilly, G, Lowe, SM, Luft, BJ, Moline, JM et al.. The World Trade Center Health Program: an introduction to best practices. Arch Environ Occup Health. 2023;78 (4):199-205. doi: 10.1080/19338244.2022.2156975. PubMed PMID:36533439 PubMed Central PMC10277307
  7. Gibson, R, Whealin, JM, Dasaro, CR, Udasin, IG, Crane, M, Moline, JM, Harrison, DJ, Luft, BJ, Todd, AC, Schechter, C et al.. Prevalence and correlates of suicidal ideation in World Trade Center responders: Results from a population-based health monitoring cohort. J Affect Disord. 2022;306 :62-70. doi: 10.1016/j.jad.2022.03.011. PubMed PMID:35283182
  8. Marchese, S, Cancelmo, L, Diab, O, Cahn, L, Aaronson, C, Daskalakis, NP, Schaffer, J, Horn, SR, Johnson, JS, Schechter, C et al.. Altered gene expression and PTSD symptom dimensions in World Trade Center responders. Mol Psychiatry. 2022;27 (4):2225-2246. doi: 10.1038/s41380-022-01457-2. PubMed PMID:35177824
  9. Sacks, HS, Smirnoff, M, Carson, D, Cooney, ML, Shapiro, MZ, Hahn, CJ, Dasaro, CR, Crowson, C, Tassiulas, I, Hirten, RP et al.. Autoimmune conditions in the World Trade Center general responder cohort: A nested case-control and standardized incidence ratio analysis. Am J Ind Med. 2022;65 (2):117-131. doi: 10.1002/ajim.23313. PubMed PMID:34825393 PubMed Central PMC8851411
  10. Belpomme, D, Carlo, GL, Irigaray, P, Carpenter, DO, Hardell, L, Kundi, M, Belyaev, I, Havas, M, Adlkofer, F, Heuser, G et al.. The Critical Importance of Molecular Biomarkers and Imaging in the Study of Electrohypersensitivity. A Scientific Consensus International Report. Int J Mol Sci. 2021;22 (14):. doi: 10.3390/ijms22147321. PubMed PMID:34298941 PubMed Central PMC8304862
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Ling Wang
Pharmacy Technician Rutgers UniversityEOHSI- Clinical Research and Occupational Medicine
Photo of Clifford P Weisel Ph.D.
Clifford P Weisel, Ph.D.
Professor Emeritus Rutgers University- School of Public HealthEOHSI – Environmental and Population Health Bio-Sciences

Research Areas

The determination of biomarkers of exposure, measurement of multiroute exposures to volatile organic compounds and disinfection by-products in drinking water, exposure to children, the role of air pollution in exacerbation of asthma, exposures within aircraft and other modes of transportation, the sources of pollutants to indoor air and their contribution to personal exposure, and how exposures alter the lung microbiome.

Research Highlights

  • Evaluation of ozone by-products
  • Exposure and dose from pesticide treatment of aircraft cabins
  • Evaluation of exposure to disinfection by-products in drinking water
  • Measurement of the lung microbiome

Scholarly Activities

  • Member of the US EPA  Board of Scientific Counselors Chemical Safety and Sustainability National Research Program-Human Health Risk Assessment
  • Member of the NJ Department of Environmental Protection Science Advisory Boards’ Public Health Standing Committee
  • Reviewer of research proposals and reports for federal and state agencies
  • Member US Environmental Protections Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA) Scientific Advisory Panel (SAP)
  • Past president of the International Society of Exposure Science and recipient of their Wesolowski Award for scientific contribution to the field

Recent Publications

  1. Gholizadeh, A, Black, K, Kipen, H, Laumbach, R, Gow, A, Weisel, C, Javanmard, M. Detection of respiratory inflammation biomarkers in non-processed exhaled breath condensate samples using reduced graphene oxide. RSC Adv. 2022;12 (55):35627-35638. doi: 10.1039/d2ra05764f. PubMed PMID:36545081 PubMed Central PMC9745889
  2. Coffaro, B, Weisel, CP. Reactions and Products of Squalene and Ozone: A Review. Environ Sci Technol. 2022;56 (12):7396-7411. doi: 10.1021/acs.est.1c07611. PubMed PMID:35648815 PubMed Central PMC9231367
  3. Ren, X, Weisel, CP, Georgopoulos, PG. Modeling Effects of Spatial Heterogeneities and Layered Exposure Interventions on the Spread of COVID-19 across New Jersey. Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2021;18 (22):. doi: 10.3390/ijerph182211950. PubMed PMID:34831706 PubMed Central PMC8618648
  4. Yu, CH, Weisel, CP, Alimokhtari, S, Georgopoulos, PG, Fan, ZT. Biomonitoring: A tool to assess PFNA body burdens and evaluate the effectiveness of drinking water intervention for communities in New Jersey. Int J Hyg Environ Health. 2021;235 :113757. doi: 10.1016/j.ijheh.2021.113757. PubMed PMID:33962122
  5. Son, Y, Weisel, C, Wackowski, O, Schwander, S, Delnevo, C, Meng, Q. The Impact of Device Settings, Use Patterns, and Flavorings on Carbonyl Emissions from Electronic Cigarettes. Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2020;17 (16):. doi: 10.3390/ijerph17165650. PubMed PMID:32764435 PubMed Central PMC7460324
  6. Ibironke, O, McGuinness, LR, Lu, SE, Wang, Y, Hussain, S, Weisel, CP, Kerkhof, LJ. Species-level evaluation of the human respiratory microbiome. Gigascience. 2020;9 (4):. doi: 10.1093/gigascience/giaa038. PubMed PMID:32298431 PubMed Central PMC7162353
  7. Feld-Cook, E, Shome, R, Zaleski, RT, Mohan, K, Kourtev, H, Bekris, KE, Weisel, CP, Shin, JMK. Exploring the utility of robots in exposure studies. J Expo Sci Environ Epidemiol. 2021;31 (4):784-794. doi: 10.1038/s41370-019-0190-x. PubMed PMID:31745180 PubMed Central PMC7234925
  8. Graber, JM, Alexander, C, Laumbach, RJ, Black, K, Strickland, PO, Georgopoulos, PG, Marshall, EG, Shendell, DG, Alderson, D, Mi, Z et al.. Per and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) blood levels after contamination of a community water supply and comparison with 2013-2014 NHANES. J Expo Sci Environ Epidemiol. 2019;29 (2):172-182. doi: 10.1038/s41370-018-0096-z. PubMed PMID:30482936 PubMed Central PMC6380951
  9. Fiedler, N, Weisel, C, Nwankwo, C, Kipen, H, Lange, G, Ohman-Strickland, P, Laumbach, R. Chronic Exposure to Solvents Among Construction Painters: Reductions in Exposure and Neurobehavioral Health Effects. J Occup Environ Med. 2018;60 (12):e663-e670. doi: 10.1097/JOM.0000000000001470. PubMed PMID:30308619 PubMed Central PMC6289817
  10. Zhou, J, Mainelis, G, Weisel, CP. Pyrethroid levels in toddlers' breathing zone following a simulated indoor pesticide spray. J Expo Sci Environ Epidemiol. 2019;29 (3):389-396. doi: 10.1038/s41370-018-0065-6. PubMed PMID:30185948 PubMed Central PMC7323485
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Photo of William J Welsh Ph.D.
William J Welsh, Ph.D.
Professor in Bioinformatics and Molecular Design Rutgers UniversityEOHSI – Environmental and Population Health Bio-Sciences

Research Areas

Dr. Welsh’s laboratory specializes in the development and application of computational tools for pharmaceutical drug discovery, predictive toxicology, and multi-dimensional pattern recognition. His laboratory’s interests extend to the molecular design and modeling of synthetic polymers, protein-material interactions, and protein-ligand interactions. In recent years, his laboratory has participated in the discovery of potential drug candidates for the treatment cancer, severe and chronic pain, and infectious diseases.

Research Highlights

Implemented the Shape Signatures tool for applications relevant to computational toxicology; major accomplishments achieved include:

  1. Development of shape-based regression and classification models to predict inhibitors of acetylcholine esterase;
  2. Development of shape-based classification models to predict ligands to the human Ether-a-go-go gene (hERG) and the humanhydroxytryptophan 2b (5HT2b) receptor, both of which are associated with cardiotoxicity;
  3. Development of shape-based classification models to predict ligand blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability, which is a prerequisite for CNS activity

Employed molecular modeling approaches to delineate and visualize how human ADA3 regulates the transcriptional activity of RAR(alpha) through direct interaction between LxxLL motifs and the receptor coactivator pocket.
Developed shape-based prioritization and classification approaches to predict human pregnane x receptor activators.
Identified and characterized a binding site for small-molecule PXR antagonists that interact on the outer surface of PXR at the AF-2 domain; major accomplishments achieved include:

  1. Development of a pharmacophore that describes the structural requirements for these PXR antagonists
  2. Computational prediction, and in vitro confirmation, of several low-micromolar PXR antagonists that target this binding site at the AF-2 domain.
  3. Development of a three-dimensional structural model of the PXR.2, the major human PXR splice variant that demonstrates reduced ligand-activated transcriptional activation compared with the wild-type PXR.1.

Using microarray techniques to characterize gene expression profiles predictive of monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(III)) exposure and mode of action of carcinogenesis, we observed increases in transcript abundance of Fosl1, Myc, and Rac1 oncogenes in mouse skin. The results support previous findings of the inducibility of these oncogenes in response to arsenic and support the relevance of these genomic changes in skin tumor induction in the K6/ODC mouse model.

Scholarly Activities

  • Served as an external consultant for the US EPA in preparing instructional materials for the agency’s training program “New Developments in Computational Methods for Risk Assessment” (Sept-Dec 2010).
  • Presented seminar on the topic “Computational Models for Risk Assessment” at the Molecular Operating Environment (MOE) software workshop, located in Monmouth Junction, NJ (October 2010).
  • Presented invited seminar entitled “Chemometric Models to Discriminate USP-grade Heparin from Impure and Contaminated Heparin” at the American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists meeting in New Orleans, LA (November 15, 2010).
  • Presented invited seminar entitled “Novel Designs of Autophagy Inhibitors as Anticancer Drugs” at the UMDNJ-RWJMS Cancer Institute of New Jersey (November 29, 2010).
  • Presented invited seminar at the U.S. Army Telemedicine and Advanced Technology Research Center (TATRC) Program Review at the Center for Biomaterials Research, Rutgers University, on December 15, 2010.
  • Contributed a talk entitled “Computational Approaches to Accelerate the Discovery of Medical Countermeasures Against Select Agents” at the US DoD Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) Program Review held in College Station TX on January 10-13, 2011.
  • Presented an invited seminar entitled “Rational Computer-Aided Design of Drugs to Combat Biowarfare Agents” at the New York Center for Structural Biology in New York City on January 21, 2011.
  • Presented an invited seminar entitled “Accelerating Drug Discovery” at the University of Cincinnati Medical Center, Cincinnati OH on February 22, 2011.
  • Presented an invited seminar entitled “Novel Computational Approaches to Accelerate Drug Discovery” at Kean University in New Jersey on March 2, 2011.

Recent Publication

  1. Zhang, VY, O'Connor, SL, Welsh, WJ, James, MH. Machine learning models to predict ligand binding affinity for the orexin 1 receptor. Artif Intell Chem. 2024;2 (1):. doi: 10.1016/j.aichem.2023.100040. PubMed PMID:38476266 PubMed Central PMC10927255
  2. Knowles, LG, Armanious, AJ, Peng, Y, Welsh, WJ, James, MH. Recent advances in drug discovery efforts targeting the sigma 1 receptor system: Implications for novel medications designed to reduce excessive drug and food seeking. Addict Neurosci. 2023;8 :. doi: 10.1016/j.addicn.2023.100126. PubMed PMID:37753198 PubMed Central PMC10519676
  3. Yu, Y, Dong, H, Peng, Y, Welsh, WJ. QSAR-Based Computational Approaches to Accelerate the Discovery of Sigma-2 Receptor (S2R) Ligands as Therapeutic Drugs. Molecules. 2021;26 (17):. doi: 10.3390/molecules26175270. PubMed PMID:34500703 PubMed Central PMC8434483
  4. Peng, Y, Zhang, Q, Welsh, WJ. Novel Sigma 1 Receptor Antagonists as Potential Therapeutics for Pain Management. J Med Chem. 2021;64 (1):890-904. doi: 10.1021/acs.jmedchem.0c01964. PubMed PMID:33372782
  5. Peng, Y, Zhang, Q, Zielinski, RM, Howells, RD, Welsh, WJ. Identification of an irreversible PPARγ antagonist with potent anticancer activity. Pharmacol Res Perspect. 2020;8 (6):e00693. doi: 10.1002/prp2.693. PubMed PMID:33280279 PubMed Central PMC7719157
  6. Peng, Y, Dong, H, Welsh, WJ. Comprehensive 3D-QSAR Model Predicts Binding Affinity of Structurally Diverse Sigma 1 Receptor Ligands. J Chem Inf Model. 2019;59 (1):486-497. doi: 10.1021/acs.jcim.8b00521. PubMed PMID:30497261
  7. Kang, JS, Zhang, AL, Faheem, M, Zhang, CJ, Ai, N, Buynak, JD, Welsh, WJ, Oelschlaeger, P. Virtual Screening and Experimental Testing of B1 Metallo-β-lactamase Inhibitors. J Chem Inf Model. 2018;58 (9):1902-1914. doi: 10.1021/acs.jcim.8b00133. PubMed PMID:30107123 PubMed Central PMC6527342
  8. Kimani, SG, Kumar, S, Bansal, N, Singh, K, Kholodovych, V, Comollo, T, Peng, Y, Kotenko, SV, Sarafianos, SG, Bertino, JR et al.. Small molecule inhibitors block Gas6-inducible TAM activation and tumorigenicity. Sci Rep. 2017;7 :43908. doi: 10.1038/srep43908. PubMed PMID:28272423 PubMed Central PMC5341070
  9. Ai, N, Wood, RD, Yang, E, Welsh, WJ. Niclosamide is a Negative Allosteric Modulator of Group I Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors: Implications for Neuropathic Pain. Pharm Res. 2016;33 (12):3044-3056. doi: 10.1007/s11095-016-2027-9. PubMed PMID:27631130
  10. Groen, N, Guvendiren, M, Rabitz, H, Welsh, WJ, Kohn, J, de Boer, J. Stepping into the omics era: Opportunities and challenges for biomaterials science and engineering. Acta Biomater. 2016;34 :133-142. doi: 10.1016/j.actbio.2016.02.015. PubMed PMID:26876875 PubMed Central PMC4830461
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Xia Wen, Ph.D.
Research Associate Rutgers UniversityEOHSI – Toxicology
Photo of Charles J Weschler Ph.D.
Charles J Weschler, Ph.D.
Adjunct Professor Rutgers UniversityEOHSI – Environmental and Population Health Bio-Sciences

After completing his Ph.D. in chemistry at the University of Chicago, Dr. Weschler did postdoctoral studies with Prof. Fred Basolo at Northwestern University. In 1975 he joined Bell Laboratories as a research scientist in the Physical Chemistry Division. He conducted research at Bell Labs and its successor institutions until 2001 being named a Distinguished Member of Technical Staff (1986). In 2001 he retired from Bellcore/Telcordia and accepted positions at the Environmental & Occupational Health Science Institute and the International Centre for Indoor Environment and Energy, Technical University of Denmark. He has continued in those positions through the present. In 2010 he joined the faculty of the Building Science department at Tsinghua University (Beijing) as an ongoing Visiting Professor. He is also an Adjunct Professor in the Rutgers School of Public Health. He was a Member of the Committee on Air Quality in Passenger Cabins in Commercial Aircraft, National Academy of Sciences, 2000-2001; Advisor on Strategies to Protect the Health of Deployed US Forces, National Academy of Sciences, 1998-2000; Member of the Committee to Review the Structure and Performance of the Health Effects Institute, National Academy of Sciences, 1991-1993; and Member of the Committee on Advances in Assessing Human Exposure to Airborne Pollutants, National Academy of Sciences, 1987-1990. From 1999-2005 he served on the US EPA’s Science Advisory Board. He was elected to the International Academy of Indoor Air Sciences in 1999 and received the Pettenkofer Award, its highest honor, in 2014. He has been conferred the 2017 Haagen-Smit Prize from Atmospheric Environment; “Distinguished Visiting Professor” at Tsinghua University (2018); “Doctor Technices Honoris Causa” from the Technical University of Denmark (2018); and was recently (2020) elected a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). He has an h-index of 75 with over 19,000 citations (Web of Science) and 86 with over 27,000 citations (Google Scholar).

Chemical reactions among indoor pollutants; their products, including free radicals and secondary organic aerosols. Gas/particle and gas/surface partitioning in indoor environments. Factors that influence the concentrations, transport and surface accumulations of indoor pollutants. Indoor pollutant exposures; their contributions to total pollutant exposures and consequent health effects. Uptake of organic pollutants via dermal absorption

Research Highlights

  • Identified phthalates, organophosphates and cyclic siloxanes in indoor airborne particles (early ’80s).
  • Identified certain reactions catalyzed by transition metals as sources of free radicals within aqueous atmospheric aerosols (mid ’80’s).
  • Early assessment of indoor ozone exposures showing that they are often comparable to or larger than outdoor exposures (late ’80s).
  • Demonstrated substantive impact of ozone-initiated chemistry on indoor environments (early ’90s).
  • Outlined circumstantial evidence for meaningful levels of nitrate radicals indoors (early ’90s).
  • Predicted, and later confirmed, significant indoor levels of hydroxyl radicals from ozone/terpene reactions (mid 90s).
  • Called out broad influence of indoor chemistry and suggesting areas for future research; follow-up reviews at 7-yr intervals (mid ’90s).
  • Identified ozone/terpene chemistry as a strong indoor source of secondary organic aerosols (late ’90s).
  • Recognized the potential adverse health effects of ozone reaction products indoors (mid ’00s).
  • Critically reviewed indoor pollutants, primary & secondary, resulting from the use of cleaning agents and air fresheners indoors (mid ’00s).
  • Discovered the importance of ozone/skin oil chemistry as a sink for ozone and a source of oxygenated organics in occupied environments (late ’00s).
  • Cataloged the changing nature of the chemicals found indoors over the past 50 years (late ’00s).
  • Presented a physical-chemistry based framework for better understanding of SVOC dynamics in indoor environments (late ’00s).
  • Demonstrated that city-to-city differences in indoor exposures to outdoor ozone partially explain city-to-city variability in short-term mortality coefficients associated with ozone; similarly for PM10 (early ’10s).
  • Identified dermal absorption, directly from air, as a significant exposure pathway for certain indoor organic pollutants (early ’10s).

Scholarly Activities

  • Visiting Professor (ongoing), International Centre for Indoor Environment and Energy, Technical University of Denmark, 2001 – present.
  • Visiting Professor & Distinguished Visiting Professor, Building Sciences, Tsinghua University (Beijing), 2010 – present.
  • Editorial advisory boards: Indoor Air: 2007-present; Atmospheric Environment: 2003-2014
  • Indoor Air Associate Editor, 2001-2007
  • Co-PI in the Air Transportation Center of Excellence for Airliner Cabin Environment Research (ACER) sponsored by U.S. FAA, 2004 – 2014.
  • Served on four committees for the National Academy of Sciences, the U.S. EPA’s Science Advisory Board and NIOSH’s NORA committee. Former Chair of the Science Advisory Board for an NSF Center at University of Texas, Austin.
  • Guest Professor: University of Innsbruck, Austria (2004, 2006 — 2009); University of Kuopio, Finland (2004); University of Umea, Sweden (2003)

Publications

Click here for a full list of Dr. Weschler’s Publications

  1. Langer, S, Weschler, CJ, Bekö, G, Morrison, G, Sjöblom, A, Giovanoulis, G, Wargocki, P, Wang, N, Zannoni, N, Yang, S et al.. Squalene Depletion in Skin Following Human Exposure to Ozone under Controlled Chamber Conditions. Environ Sci Technol. 2024;58 (15):6693-6703. doi: 10.1021/acs.est.3c09394. PubMed PMID:38577981
  2. Weschler, CJ, Nazaroff, WW. Ozone Loss: A Surrogate for the Indoor Concentration of Ozone-Derived Products. Environ Sci Technol. 2023;57 (36):13569-13578. doi: 10.1021/acs.est.3c03968. PubMed PMID:37639667
  3. Qu, Y, Zou, Z, Weschler, CJ, Liu, Y, Yang, X. Quantifying Ozone-Dependent Emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds from the Human Body. Environ Sci Technol. 2023;57 (35):13104-13113. doi: 10.1021/acs.est.3c02340. PubMed PMID:37610659
  4. He, L, Weschler, CJ, Zhang, Y, Li, F, Bergin, MH, Black, M, Zhang, JJ. Ozone Reaction Products Associated with Biomarkers of Cardiorespiratory Pathophysiology. Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2023;207 (9):1243-1246. doi: 10.1164/rccm.202212-2203LE. PubMed PMID:36701642 PubMed Central PMC10161747
  5. Zannoni, N, Lakey, PSJ, Won, Y, Shiraiwa, M, Rim, D, Weschler, CJ, Wang, N, Ernle, L, Li, M, Bekö, G et al.. The human oxidation field. Science. 2022;377 (6610):1071-1077. doi: 10.1126/science.abn0340. PubMed PMID:36048928
  6. Abbatt, JPD, Morrison, GC, Grassian, VH, Shiraiwa, M, Weschler, CJ, Ziemann, PJ. How should we define an indoor surface?. Indoor Air. 2022;32 (1):e12955. doi: 10.1111/ina.12955. PubMed PMID:35104002
  7. Yang, S, Licina, D, Weschler, CJ, Wang, N, Zannoni, N, Li, M, Vanhanen, J, Langer, S, Wargocki, P, Williams, J et al.. Ozone Initiates Human-Derived Emission of Nanocluster Aerosols. Environ Sci Technol. 2021;55 (21):14536-14545. doi: 10.1021/acs.est.1c03379. PubMed PMID:34672572
  8. Nazaroff, WW, Weschler, CJ. Indoor ozone: Concentrations and influencing factors. Indoor Air. 2022;32 (1):e12942. doi: 10.1111/ina.12942. PubMed PMID:34609012
  9. Zannoni, N, Li, M, Wang, N, Ernle, L, Bekö, G, Wargocki, P, Langer, S, Weschler, CJ, Morrison, G, Williams, J et al.. Effect of Ozone, Clothing, Temperature, and Humidity on the Total OH Reactivity Emitted from Humans. Environ Sci Technol. 2021;55 (20):13614-13624. doi: 10.1021/acs.est.1c01831. PubMed PMID:34591444 PubMed Central PMC8529706
  10. Liu, Y, Misztal, PK, Arata, C, Weschler, CJ, Nazaroff, WW, Goldstein, AH. Observing ozone chemistry in an occupied residence. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2021;118 (6):. doi: 10.1073/pnas.2018140118. PubMed PMID:33526680 PubMed Central PMC8017968
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Shannon Wiese, RN,BSN
Staff Nurse Rutgers UniversityEOHSI – Employee Health and World Trade Center Health Program Clinic
Photo of Lorna Wilson
Lorna Wilson
Administrative Assistant EOHSI – Central Administration
Photo of Shuo Xiao Ph.D.
Shuo Xiao, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor – Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology Rutgers University – Ernest Mario School of PharmacyEOHSI- Toxicology

Biographical Info

Dr. Xiao is an Assistant Professor from the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy at Rutgers University. He received his BMed in Preventive Medicine and MS in Toxicology from Peking University Health Science Center and obtained his PhD in Reproductive Biology and Toxicology from Dr. Xiaoqin Ye’s lab at the University of Georgia (UGA). Dr. Xiao completed his postdoctoral fellowship in Dr. Teresa Woodruff’s lab at Northwestern University Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology. Dr. Xiao started his faculty appointment in 2017 at University of South Carolina School of Public Health Department of Environmental Health Sciences. In 2020, Dr. Xiao moved his lab to Rutgers University.

Research Areas

Dr. Xiao’s research is primarily focused on female reproductive biology, disease, and toxicology, including (1) adverse effects of emerging environmental contaminants on women’s reproductive health, in particular of ovarian functions, menstrual cycle, and fertility; (2) engineering female reproductive system using microfluidic and organ-on-a-chip technologies; (3) developing novel non-hormonal female contraceptives; and (4) environmental exposure on women’s reproductive diseases such as polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). Dr. Xiao’s research is supported by NIH (R01ES032144), Department of Defense (DOD, TX220205), Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (INV-003385), Health and Environmental Sciences Institute (HESI), and New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP), and Rutgers Office for Research and EOHSI.

Research Highlights

  • Ovarian disrupting effects of classic and emerging environmental contaminants
  • Mechanism of cancer treatment-induced premature ovarian failure and infertility in young female cancer patients
  • Fertility preservation for young female cancer patients
  • Engineering female reproductive system on a chip
  • Development of novel non-hormonal contraceptive for women

Scholarly Activities and Recent Awards

  • Co-Chair of Basic Science Committee, Oncofertility Consortium
  • Editorial Board: Reproductive Toxicology, Biology of Reproduction, and Endocrinology,
  • Teaching and Laboratory Faculty, Frontiers in Reproduction (FIR), Marine Biology Laboratory (MBL), Woods Hole, MA
  • American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics (ASPET) Toxicology Division Early Career Award, 2024
  • JOINN Biomere Outstanding Young Toxicologist Award of American Association of Chinese in Toxicology (AACT), 2023
  • Chancellor Basic Sciences Researcher Award, Rutgers Biomedical and Health Sciences (RBHS), Rutgers University, 2022
  • New-Career Scientist Award, Reproductive and Developmental Toxicology Specialty Section (RDTSS), Society of Toxicology (SOT), 2022
  • The Rising Stars in Reproductive Biology Webinar Series. Society for the Study of Reproduction (SSR), 2022
  • Best Publication in Toxicological Sciences, Reproductive and Developmental Toxicology Specialty Section (RDTSS), Society of Toxicology (SOT) Annual Meeting, 2021

Recent publications (*as the corresponding author)

  1. Wang Y, Pattarawat P, Zhang J, Kim E, Zhang D, Fang M, Jannaman EA, Yuan Y, Chatterjee S, Kim JJ, Scott GI, Zhang Q, Xiao S*. Cyanobacterial harmful algal bloom toxin microcystin-LR interferes with gonadotropin-dependent ovarian follicle maturation and ovulation. Environmental Health Perspectives (EHP). 2023 Jun;131(6):67010. PMID: 37342990. (NIEHS Papers of the Month in September 2023)
  2. Zhang J, Russo DD, Wang Y, Zhang Q, Zelinski MB, Shalet AK, Goods BA, Xiao S*. Vitrification preserves follicular transcriptomic dynamics during ex vivo ovulation. Biology of Reproduction (BOR). 2023 Sep 12;109(3):240-243.PMID: 37498173.
  3. McClam M, Liu J, Fan Yi, Zhang T, Zhang WQ, Porter DE, Scott GI, Xiao S*. Associations between exposure to single cadmium, lead, mercury and mixtures and women’s infertility and long-term amenorrhea. Achieves of Public Health. 2023; 81: 161. PMID: 37626539.
  4. Zhang J, Goods BA, Pattarawat P, Wang Y, Haining T, Zhang Q, Shalek AK, Duncan FE, Woodruff TK, Xiao S*. An ex vivo ovulation system enables the discovery of novel ovulatory pathways and non-hormonal contraceptive candidates. Biology of Reproduction (BOR). 2023 Apr 11;108(4):629-644.
  5. Wang Y, Russo DD, Pattarawat P, Zhang Q, Zelinski MB, Shalek AK, Goods BA, Xiao S*. Vitrification preserves murine ovarian follicular cell transcriptome in a 3D encapsulated in vitro follicle growth system. Biology of Reproduction (BOR). 2021.
  6. Jiang K, Zhang J, Huang Y, Wang Y, Xiao S, Hadden MK, Woodruff TK, Sun J. A platform utilizing Drosophila ovulation for nonhormonal contraceptive screening. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences(PNAS). 2021.
  7. Xu J, Wang Y, Kauffman AE, Zhang Y, Li Y, Zhu J, Maratea K, Fabre K, Zhang Q, Woodruff TK, Xiao S*. A tiered female ovarian toxicity screening identifies toxic effects of checkpoint 2 kinase 1 inhibitors on murine growing follicles. Toxicological Sciences. 2020.
  8. Zubizarreta ME, and Xiao S*. Bioengineering models of female reproduction. Bio-Design and Manufacturing. 2020.
  9. Jiang B, Kauffman AE, Li L, McFee W, Cai B, Weinstein J, Lead J, Chatterjee S, Scott GI, Xiao S*. Health impacts of environmental contamination of micro- and nanoplastics: a review. Environmental Health and Preventive Medicine. 2020.
  10. Wang Y, Xu J, Stanley J. Xu M, Brooks BW, Scott GI, Chatterjee S. Zhang Q, Zelinski MB, Xiao S*. A closed vitrification system enables a murine ovarian follicle bank for high-throughput ovotoxicity screening, which identifies the endocrine disrupting activity of microcystins. Reproductive Toxicology. 2020.
  11. Sarkar S, Alhasson F, Kimono D, Albadrani M, Seth RK, Xiao S, Porter DE, Scott GI,
  12. Wang Y, Liu M, Johnson SB, Yuan G, Arriba AK, Zubizarreta ME, Chatterjee S, Nagarkatti M, Nagarkatti P, Xiao S*. Doxorubicin obliterates mouse ovarian reserve through both primordial follicle atresia and overactivation. Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology. 2019.
  13. Andersen CL, Liu M, Wang Z, Ye X*, Xiao S*. Chemotherapeutic agent doxorubicin alters uterine gene expression in response to estrogen in ovariectomized CD-1 adult mice. Biology of Reproduction. 2019.
  14. Wang Y, Chen H, Ju K, Kopp MF, Johnson SB, Farrell KK, Yuan G, Ataman LM, Zheng W, Woodruff TK, Xiao S*. Female oncofertility attitude and knowledge: a survey of reproductive health professionals in Shanghai, China. Future Oncology.
  15. Ju K, Kopp M, Wang Y, Yuan G, Zheng W, Ataman LM, Woodruff TK, Chen Q, Xiao S*. A Survey Study of Attitude and Knowledge Regarding Female Fertility Preservation Among Reproductive Health Professionals in Fujian, China. Journal of Adolescent Young Adult Oncology. 2019.
  16. Wang Y, Liu M, Zhang, J, Liu Y, Kopp M, Zheng W, Xiao S*. Multidrug resistance protein 1 deficiency promotes doxorubicin-induced ovarian toxicity in female mice. Toxicological Sciences. 2018 (Cover image).
  17. Xiao S, Coppeta JR, Rogers HB, Isenberg BC, Zhu J, Olalekan SA, McKinnon KE, Dokic D, Rashedi AS, Haisenleder DJ, Malpani SS, Arnold-Murray CA, Chen K, Jiang M, Bai L, Nguyen CT, Zhang J, Laronda MM, Hope TJ, Maniar KP, Pavone ME, Avram MJ, Sefton EC, Getsios S, Burdette JE, Kim JJ, Borenstein JT, Woodruff TK. A microfluidic culture model of the human reproductive tract and 28-day menstrual cycle. Nature Communications. 2017 (NIEHS 2017 Papers of the Year).
  18. Laronda MM, Rutz AL, Xiao S, Whelan KA, Duncan FE, Roth EW, Woodruff TK, Shah RN. A bioprosthetic ovary created using 3D printed microporous scaffolds restores ovarian function in sterilized mice. Nature Communications. 2017.
  19. Xiao S*, Zhang J, Liu M, Iwahata H, Rogers HB, Woodruff TK. Doxorubicin Has Dose-Dependent Toxicity on Mouse Ovarian Follicle Development, Hormone Secretion, and Oocyte Maturation. Toxicological Sciences. 2017.
  20. Xiao S, Li R, El Zowalaty A, Diao H, Zhao F, Choi Y and Ye X. Acidification of uterine epithelium during embryo implantation in mice. Biology of Reproduction. 2017.
  21. Xiao S, Zhang J, Romero MM, Smith KN, Shea LD, Woodruff TK. In vitro follicle growth supports human oocyte meiotic maturation. Scientific Reports. 2015.
  22. Xiao S, Duncan FE, Bai L, Nguyen, CT, Shea LD, Woodruff TK. Size-specific follicle selection improves mouse oocyte reproductive outcomes. Reproduction,

The full publication list is available at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/myncbi/shuo.xiao.1/bibliography/public/

Photo of Chung “CS” Yang Ph.D.
Chung “CS” Yang, Ph.D.
Distinguished Professor & John L. Colaizzi Endowed Chair in Pharmacy Rutgers University, Ernest Mario School of PharmacyEOHSI – Toxicology

Research Areas

Mechanisms of carcinogenesis and its prevention, including development of new animal models for colon ad prostate cancers as well as studies on the inhibition of carcinogenesis by tea constituents, tocopherols, and their combination with commonly used drugs. Research is being conducted in animal models, on molecular investigation with cell lines, and in humans.

Research Highlights

  • Development of animal models for colon and prostate cancers using humanized CYP1A mice and PhIP (a dietary carcinogen) to study dietary cancer prevention.
  • Elucidation of the cancer preventive activities and mechanisms of action of green tea polyphenols.
  • Demonstration of the broad cancer prevention activities of tocopherols, especially the higher activity of d-tocopherol than g-tocopherol, and the ineffectiveness of a-tocopherol.
  • Elucidation of the inhibition of the interactions between cancer cells and myeloid derived suppressor cells in vivo and in vitro by curcumin.
  • Conducting translational research on tocopherols in prostate cancer patients.

Scholarly Activities

  • Conduct research as described above.
  • Teach a course on “Diet, Nutrition and Disease Prevention in Pharmacy Practice” and lecture in the course “Molecular Biology and Pharmaceutical Biotechnology.”
  • Serve as a Leader of the Carcinogenesis and Chemoprevention Program of the Cancer Institute of New Jersey.
  • Serve on editorial board of several scientific journals and currently editing a special volume on “Tea and Health” for Pharmacological Research.

Recent Publications

  1. Hong, D, Kim, HK, Yang, W, Yoon, C, Kim, M, Yang, CS, Yoon, S. Integrative analysis of single-cell RNA-seq and gut microbiome metabarcoding data elucidates macrophage dysfunction in mice with DSS-induced ulcerative colitis. Commun Biol. 2024;7 (1):731. doi: 10.1038/s42003-024-06409-w. PubMed PMID:38879692 PubMed Central PMC11180211
  2. Husain, K, Coppola, D, Yang, CS, Malafa, MP. Effect of vitamin E δ-tocotrienol and aspirin on Wnt signaling in human colon cancer stem cells and in adenoma development in APCmin/+ mice. Carcinogenesis. 2024; :. doi: 10.1093/carcin/bgae041. PubMed PMID:38877828
  3. Gibbs, KW, Semler, MW, Driver, BE, Seitz, KP, Stempek, SB, Taylor, C, Resnick-Ault, D, White, HD, Gandotra, S, Doerschug, KC et al.. Noninvasive Ventilation for Preoxygenation during Emergency Intubation. N Engl J Med. 2024;390 (23):2165-2177. doi: 10.1056/NEJMoa2313680. PubMed PMID:38869091
  4. Ivanesthi, IR, Latifah, E, Amrullah, LF, Tseng, YK, Chuang, TH, Pan, HC, Yang, CS, Liu, SY, Wang, CC. Adaptation of a eukaryote-like ProRS to a prokaryote-like tRNAPro. Nucleic Acids Res. 2024; :. doi: 10.1093/nar/gkae483. PubMed PMID:38842939
  5. Yeh, CH, Hsu, WD, Liu, BH, Yang, CS, Kuan, CY, Chang, YC, Huang, KS, Jhang, SS, Lu, CY, Liaw, PK et al.. Low-frequency conductivity of low wear high-entropy alloys. Nat Commun. 2024;15 (1):4554. doi: 10.1038/s41467-024-49035-0. PubMed PMID:38811587 PubMed Central PMC11136967
  6. Li, T, Li, JW, Qin, YH, Liu, R, Xu, XN, Li, X, Li, LM, Feng, B, Yang, L, Yang, CS et al.. 4-Octyl itaconate inhibits inflammation via the NLRP3 pathway in neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders. Ann Clin Transl Neurol. 2024; :. doi: 10.1002/acn3.52080. PubMed PMID:38738556
  7. Wang, JM, Pan, YT, Yang, CS, Liu, MC, Ji, SC, Han, N, Liu, F, Sun, GX. Effect of inflammatory response on joint function after hip fracture in elderly patients: A clinical study. World J Orthop. 2024;15 (4):337-345. doi: 10.5312/wjo.v15.i4.337. PubMed PMID:38680675 PubMed Central PMC11045470
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Photo of Hilly (ILL) Yang M.S., Ph.D.
Hilly (ILL) Yang, M.S., Ph.D.
Associate Director of Methods Research Chemixal Analytical Facility CoreRutgers University – Chemistry & Chemical Biology
Shaojun Yang, Ph.D.
Rutgers UniversityEOHSI – Toxicology
Kate York,, LCSW
Cllinician Supervisor World Trade Center Health ProgramEOHSI – Clinical Research and Occupational Medicine
Photo of Guofeng You Ph.D.
Guofeng You, Ph.D.
Distinguished Professor Rutgers University, Ernest Mario School of PharmacyEOHSI – Toxicology

Research Areas

Molecular and Cellular Pharmacology, Drug/Xenobiotic Absorption, Distribution and Elimination, Membrane Transporters

Drug transporters mediate the absorption, distribution, and excretion of a diverse array of clinically important drugs, including anti-HIV therapeutics, anti-tumor drugs, antibiotics, anti-hypertensives, and anti-inflammatories, and therefore are critical to the survival of the mammalian species. The goal of Dr. You’s research is to elucidate the molecular, cellular, and functional characteristics of these transporters, their implications in human physiology and diseases, and their applications to drug therapy. Techniques in molecular and cellular biology, physiology, biochemistry, and biophysics are used to investigate the transport mechanisms both in vitro and in vivo. The knowledge gained from these studies will have significant impact on the future design of strategies aimed at maximizing therapeutic efficacy and minimizing toxicity, and will permit insight into the molecular, cellular, and clinical bases of renal, hepatic, neurological and fetal toxicity and disease.

Research Highlights

Dr. You’s lab, standing at the forefront of drug transport research, a research area of highly pharmacological and clinical importance, has uncovered several mechanisms underlying the regulation of drug transporters OATs. Her lab is the first to report that OAT activity can be regulated by membrane trafficking, ubiquitination, glycosylation, phosphorlation, and environmental pH.

Scholarly Activities

  • 2012-2014 Co-Editor, Book “Drug Transporters” to be published by Wiley & Son, NY, NY
  • 2012-2013 Executive Council, Graduate School-New Brunswick, Rutgers University
  • 2011-2012 Co-Chair, Mission, Planning & Evaluation sub-committee, ACPE Steering Committee, School of Pharmacy, Rutgers University
  • 2012 NIH Review Panel for COBRE Pilot Project Applications
  • 2012 NIH Special Emphasis Review Panel for Program Project Grants.
  • 2008-2011 Executive Committee, Student and Postdoc Outreach and Development, American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists
  • 2007-2011 NIH Study Section Permanent Member, Cellular and Molecular Biology of the Kidney
  • 2011 NIH Special Emphasis Review Panel for Program Project Grants.
  • 2011 Committee, Pharmaceutical Research Meritorious Manuscript Award, Pharmaceutical Research
  • 2010 Co-Chair, Symposium “Transport Proteins I: Regulatory Mechanisms That Modulate Drug Disposition and Response”, American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists, Georgia.
  • 2009-present Editorial Board, International Journal of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
  • 2008-2012 Executive Committee, Drug Transport Focus Group, American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientist
  • 2006-present Editorial Board, Pharmaceutical Research

Recent Publications

  1. Ni, Y, Li, L, Bao, Y, You, G, Li, J. Relationship between perceived organisational support, self-efficacy, proactive personality and career self-management among nurses: a moderated mediation analysis. BMJ Open. 2024;14 (6):e081334. doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2023-081334. PubMed PMID:38904141 PubMed Central PMC11191799
  2. Ying, X, You, G, Shao, R. The analysis of the efficacy and safety of stereotactic body radiotherapy with sequential immune checkpoint inhibitors in the management of oligoprogressive advanced non-small cell lung cancer. Transl Cancer Res. 2024;13 (5):2408-2418. doi: 10.21037/tcr-23-2232. PubMed PMID:38881915 PubMed Central PMC11170538
  3. Zhu, K, Wang, L, Xiao, Y, Zhang, X, You, G, Chen, Y, Wang, Q, Zhao, L, Zhou, H, Chen, G et al.. Nanomaterial-related hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers, with emphasis on liposome and nano-capsules, for biomedical applications: current status and future perspectives. J Nanobiotechnology. 2024;22 (1):336. doi: 10.1186/s12951-024-02606-1. PubMed PMID:38880905 PubMed Central PMC11180412
  4. Lee, H, You, G, Yeo, S, Lee, H, Mok, H. Effects of Histidine Oligomers in Lipid Nanoparticles on siRNA Delivery. Macromol Biosci. 2024; :e2400043. doi: 10.1002/mabi.202400043. PubMed PMID:38819534
  5. Oh, HH, Kim, JS, Lim, JW, Lim, CJ, Seo, YE, You, GR, Im, CM, Kim, KH, Kim, DH, Kim, HS et al.. Clinical outcomes of colorectal neoplasm with positive resection margin after endoscopic submucosal dissection. Sci Rep. 2024;14 (1):12353. doi: 10.1038/s41598-024-63129-1. PubMed PMID:38811758 PubMed Central PMC11136969
  6. Hu, Y, Yu, M, You, G, Fan, J, Zheng, H. Evaluation of MeltPro Assay in Identification of Second-Line Injectable Drug Resistance in Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis Isolates. Infect Drug Resist. 2024;17 :2069-2076. doi: 10.2147/IDR.S459142. PubMed PMID:38807773 PubMed Central PMC11131950
  7. Yu, Z, You, G. Topotecan and Ginkgolic Acid Inhibit the Expression and Transport Activity of Human Organic Anion Transporter 3 by Suppressing SUMOylation of the Transporter. Pharmaceutics. 2024;16 (5):. doi: 10.3390/pharmaceutics16050638. PubMed PMID:38794300 PubMed Central PMC11124914
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Photo of Lily Young Ph.D.
Lily Young, Ph.D.
Professor and Dean of International Programs Rutgers University, School of Environmental and Biological SciencesEOHSI – Environmental and Population Health Bio-Sciences

Dr. Young is a Professor and Chair in Rutgers Department of Environmental Sciences and Biotechnology Center for Agriculture and the Environment. She is a member of the Scientific Advisory Board of the U.S. Department of Defense Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program. She also serves on the EC-US Task Force on Environmental Biotechnology.

Research Areas

Examining the instrinsic ability of anaerobic communities from NY-NJ Harbor sediments todegrade alkanes and PAHs, and environmental factors which affect the activity Determining the novel microbial chemistry of the anaerobic pathways of naphthalene, methylnapthalene and phenanthrene by active consortia, and that of the alkanes by newly isolated pure cultures; Investigating methods to improve or enhance natural rates of biodegradation; Developing biochemical markers for assessing intrinsic biodegradation; Isolating novel anaerobes able to degrade additional petroleum constituents and other aromatic compounds; Characterizing the anaerobic toluene pathway in a denitrifying strain with a molecular genetic approach.

Scholarly Activities

  • 2001 Research Excellence Award, Board of Trustees, Rutgers Univeristy
  • 1999 Research Excellence Award, Cook College, NJ Agricultural Experiment Station, Rutgers University
  • 1996 Invited presentation to the Presidents’ Circle of the National Academy of Sciences (Advisory group to NAS President Bruce Albert, comprised of 100 buisness leaders) – Colloquium on “Water Resources for the 21st Century”; presentation title, “Environmental Biotechnology”

Recent Publications

  1. Lin, J, Huang, E, Rauch, B, Young, L, Allen, J, Myers, J. Improving Asthma Control Test completion rates across a multi-site pediatric pulmonary clinic network: a quality improvement initiative. J Asthma. 2024; :1-9. doi: 10.1080/02770903.2024.2371004. PubMed PMID:38913112
  2. NIHR Global Health Research Unit on Global Surgery, STARSurg Collaborative. A prognostic model for use before elective surgery to estimate the risk of postoperative pulmonary complications (GSU-Pulmonary Score): a development and validation study in three international cohorts. Lancet Digit Health. 2024;6 (7):e507-e519. doi: 10.1016/S2589-7500(24)00065-7. PubMed PMID:38906616
  3. Syropoulos, S, Law, KF, Kraft-Todd, G, Mah, A, Markowitz, E, Young, L. Responsibility to future generations: A strategy for combatting climate change across political divides. Br J Soc Psychol. 2024; :. doi: 10.1111/bjso.12775. PubMed PMID:38899725
  4. Kiss, N, Jongebloed, H, Baguley, B, Marshall, S, White, VM, Livingston, PM, Bell, K, Young, L, Sabesan, S, Swiatek, D et al.. Meaningful consumer involvement in cancer care: a systematic review on co-design methods and processes. JNCI Cancer Spectr. 2024; :. doi: 10.1093/jncics/pkae048. PubMed PMID:38897655
  5. Pyne, S, Barton, G, Turner, D, Mee, H, Gregson, BA, Kolias, AG, Turner, C, Adams, H, Mohan, M, Uff, C et al.. Cost-effectiveness of craniotomy versus decompressive craniectomy for UK patients with traumatic acute subdural haematoma. BMJ Open. 2024;14 (6):e085084. doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2024-085084. PubMed PMID:38885989 PubMed Central PMC11184173
  6. Wang, L, Li, S, Hao, Y, Liu, X, Liu, Y, Zuo, L, Tai, F, Yin, L, Young, LJ, Li, D et al.. Exposure to polystyrene microplastics reduces sociality and brain oxytocin levels through the gut-brain axis in mice. Sci Total Environ. 2024;945 :174026. doi: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2024.174026. PubMed PMID:38885706
  7. Shao, S, Zou, Y, Kennedy, KG, Dimick, MK, Andreazza, AC, Young, LT, Goncalves, VF, MacIntosh, BJ, Goldstein, BI. Pilot study of circulating cell-free mitochondrial DNA in relation to brain structure in youth bipolar disorder. Int J Bipolar Disord. 2024;12 (1):21. doi: 10.1186/s40345-024-00334-x. PubMed PMID:38874862 PubMed Central PMC11178693
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Photo of Helmut Zarbl Ph.D.
Helmut Zarbl, Ph.D.
EOHSI Director – Professor – NIEHS Center Director Rutgers University- School of Public HealthEOHSI – Toxicology

Dr. Zarbl serves as the Director of the NIEHS sponsored Center for Environmental Exposures and Disease. He is also the Associate Director For Public Health Sciences at the Cancer Institute of New Jersey. He serves on numerous national research review and advisory panels, and editorial panels.. Dr. Zarbl is known for his work in areas of toxicogenomics, and mechanisms of and genetic susceptibility to chemical carcinogenesis, mechanisms of mutagenesis and toxicity, and technology development. These research efforts have to date resulted in over 70 scientific papers and book chapters.

Research Areas

Research has focused largely on toxicogenomics and functional genomics, carcinogenesis, molecular and cellular biology, and toxicology. Specifically this has included work understand to molecular mechanisms of chemical carcinogenesis and the genetic basis for differential susceptibility to mammary carcinogenesis using animal and in vitro model systems, and then translating the findings to human breast cancer.

Research Highlights

Studies in the rat model have included analysis of oncogene activation, mechanisms of signal transduction, and genetic linkage analysis to identify mammary tumor suppressor genes. He has also used toxicogenomics to dissect mechanisms of mechanism carcinogenesis, tumor progression and chemoprevention. His studies in the area of toxicogenomics include the development and application of standards for DNA microarray experiments, and phenotypic anchoring of response of human cells, model organisms (yeast) and target organs (rodents) to toxicants, providing insights into dose and temporal responses, as well as mechanisms of action. He is also actively involved in technology development for functional genomics and biomarker screening.

Recent Publications

  1. Yang, Z, Black, K, Ohman-Strickland, P, Graber, JM, Kipen, HM, Fang, M, Zarbl, H. Disruption of central and peripheral circadian clocks and circadian controlled estrogen receptor rhythms in night shift nurses in working environments. FASEB J. 2024;38 (11):e23719. doi: 10.1096/fj.202302261RR. PubMed PMID:38837828
  2. Yang, Z, DeLoid, GM, Baw, J, Zarbl, H, Demokritou, P. Assessment of Ingested Micro- and Nanoplastic (MNP)-Mediated Genotoxicity in an In Vitro Model of the Small Intestinal Epithelium (SIE). Nanomaterials (Basel). 2024;14 (9):. doi: 10.3390/nano14090807. PubMed PMID:38727401 PubMed Central PMC11085749
  3. Park, Y, Kang, HG, Kang, SJ, Ku, HO, Zarbl, H, Fang, MZ, Park, JH. Combined use of multiparametric high-content-screening and in vitro circadian reporter assays in neurotoxicity evaluation. Arch Toxicol. 2024;98 (5):1485-1498. doi: 10.1007/s00204-024-03686-6. PubMed PMID:38483585 PubMed Central PMC10965668
  4. Yang, Z, Zarbl, H, Guo, GL. Circadian Regulation of Endocrine Fibroblast Growth Factors on Systemic Energy Metabolism. Mol Pharmacol. 2024;105 (3):179-193. doi: 10.1124/molpharm.123.000831. PubMed PMID:38238100 PubMed Central PMC10877735
  5. Yang, Z, DeLoid, GM, Zarbl, H, Baw, J, Demokritou, P. Micro- and nanoplastics (MNPs) and their potential toxicological outcomes: State of science, knowledge gaps and research needs. NanoImpact. 2023;32 :100481. doi: 10.1016/j.impact.2023.100481. PubMed PMID:37717636 PubMed Central PMC10841092
  6. Venosa, A, Smith, LC, Gow, AJ, Zarbl, H, Laskin, JD, Laskin, DL. Macrophage activation in the lung during the progression of nitrogen mustard induced injury is associated with histone modifications and altered miRNA expression. Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 2021;423 :115569. doi: 10.1016/j.taap.2021.115569. PubMed PMID:33971176 PubMed Central PMC8496734
  7. Liu, Y, Chen, X, Gong, Z, Zhang, H, Fei, F, Tang, X, Wang, J, Xu, P, Zarbl, H, Ren, X et al.. Fry Is Required for Mammary Gland Development During Pregnant Periods and Affects the Morphology and Growth of Breast Cancer Cells. Front Oncol. 2019;9 :1279. doi: 10.3389/fonc.2019.01279. PubMed PMID:31824855 PubMed Central PMC6881260
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Chuang (Charlie) Zhao
Rutgers UniversityEOHSI – Central Administration
Liping Zhao, Ph.D.
Professor Rutgers UniversitySchool of Environmental and Biological Sciences- Department Biochemistry and Microbiology
Photo of Wenlong Zhao Ph.D.
Wenlong Zhao, Ph.D.
Post-Doctoral Associate Rutgers – Ernest Mario School of PharmacyEOHSI – Toxicology Division
Peihong Zhou, MS
Rutgers UniversityEOHSI – Toxicology
Photo of Dr. Renping Zhou Ph.D.
Dr. Renping Zhou, Ph.D.
Professor Rutgers University, Ernest Mario School of PharmacyEOHSI – Toxicology

Research Areas

The Zhou laboratory is interested in the mechanisms mediating cell-cell communication and their roles in normal development, physiology, and diseases. Specifically the Zhou laboratory is investigating the functions of a large family of tyrosine kinase receptors, the Ephs, and their ligands, the ephrins, in neural circuit formation, eye development, and behavior regulations including motor activity, circadian rhythm, and aggression. The Zhou laboratory employs both in vitro and in vivo techniques, including neuron cultures, transgenic and knockout mice, as well as behavior assays.

Research Highlights

Demonstration of a repulsive function of ephrins in axon guidance

Discovering signal transduction pathways mediating ephrin-induced growth cone guidance

Establishing a novel cataract mouse model

Elucidating regulation of cell-cell adhesion by ephrins

Scholarly Activities

Member of editorial board: Neuroscience Bulletin; Cell & Bioscience

Membership in: AAAS, Society of Neuroscice, ARVO

Recent Publications

  1. Yin, T, Chen, S, Zhou, R, Liu, W, Diao, M, Li, L. Relationships of serum MMP-7 and clinical characteristics in choledochal cyst children. BMC Surg. 2024;24 (1):195. doi: 10.1186/s12893-024-02488-y. PubMed PMID:38914992
  2. Zhou, R, Wang, T, Lin, H. Climber, mediator, and marathoner: narrative inquiry of career motivation changes of pre-service CSL teachers throughout teaching practicum. Front Psychol. 2024;15 :1319507. doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2024.1319507. PubMed PMID:38911964 PubMed Central PMC11190364
  3. Ding, Y, Zhou, R, Shi, G, Jiang, Y, Li, Z, Xu, X, Ma, J, Huang, J, Fu, C, Zhou, H et al.. Cadherin 17 Nanobody-Mediated Near-Infrared-II Fluorescence Imaging-Guided Surgery and Immunotoxin Delivery for Colorectal Cancer. Biomater Res. 2024;28 :0041. doi: 10.34133/bmr.0041. PubMed PMID:38911825 PubMed Central PMC11192146
  4. Weng, Y, Yuan, X, Fan, S, Duan, W, Tan, Y, Zhou, R, Wu, J, Shen, Y, Zhang, Z, Xu, H et al.. 3D-Printed Biomimetic Hydroxyapatite Composite Scaffold Loaded with Curculigoside for Rat Cranial Defect Repair. ACS Omega. 2024;9 (24):26097-26111. doi: 10.1021/acsomega.4c01533. PubMed PMID:38911726 PubMed Central PMC11190930
  5. Yang, H, Hao, L, Jin, Y, Huang, J, Zhou, R, Wu, C. Functional roles and engineering strategies to improve the industrial functionalities of lactic acid bacteria during food fermentation. Biotechnol Adv. 2024; :108397. doi: 10.1016/j.biotechadv.2024.108397. PubMed PMID:38909664
  6. Zhou, R, Chen, X, Xu, D, Zhang, S, Huang, M, Chen, H, Gao, P, Zeng, Y, Zhang, L, Dai, X et al.. Hybrid wavelength selection strategy combined with ATR-FTIR spectroscopy for preliminary exploration of vintage labeling traceability of sauce-flavor baijiu. Spectrochim Acta A Mol Biomol Spectrosc. 2024;321 :124691. doi: 10.1016/j.saa.2024.124691. PubMed PMID:38909557
  7. Zhang, Y, Ge, F, Luo, Y, Ji, X, Liu, Z, Qiu, Y, Hou, J, Zhou, R, Zhao, C, Xu, Q et al.. Paeonol and glycyrrhizic acid in combination ameliorate the recurrent nitroglycerin-induced migraine-like phenotype in rats by regulating the GABBR2/TRPM8/PRKACA/TRPV1 pathway. J Ethnopharmacol. 2024; :118464. doi: 10.1016/j.jep.2024.118464. PubMed PMID:38908492
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Hao Zhu, Ph.D.
Associate Professor Rutgers UniversityCenter for Computational and Integrative Biology – FASC
Photo of Wei-Xing Zong Ph.D.
Wei-Xing Zong, Ph.D.
Professor and Co-Leader, John L. Colaizzi Chair in Pharmacy Rutgers UniversitySusan Lehman Cullman Laboratory for Cancer Research