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Photo of Debra L Laskin Ph.D
Debra L Laskin, Ph.D
Distinguished Professor and Chair Roy A. Bowers Endowed Chair Rutgers University – Ernest Mario School of PharmacyEOHSI – Toxicology

Research Areas

The overall focus of our research is immunotoxicology. We are particularly interested in inflammatory mechanisms of tissue injury. Our focus is on macrophages. Although the involvement of macrophages in protecting against invading pathogens and tumor cells is well documented, studies from my laboratory have demonstrated that macrophages also have a “dark side”. Thus, they can be activated to release excessive quantities of proinflammatory and cytotoxic mediators that actually promote tissue injury. An analysis of this process represents the main focus of our research. Two rodent models are being utilized to investigate the role of macrophages and inflammatory mediators in toxicity: the lung and the liver. In each of these tissues, we found that exposure of animals to xenobiotics such as acetaminophen and endotoxin in the liver and ozone, nano/microparticles, mustard vesicants, and chlorine is associated with localized accumulation of macrophages. Moreover, macrophages isolated from the lung or liver of animals treated with tissue specific toxicants are “activated” to release increased quantities of inflammatory mediators such as tumor necrosis factor alpha, nitric oxide and superoxide anion. To analyze the role of these cytotoxic mediators in toxicity, both pharmacologic inhibitors and transgenic mice are being utilized. Another aspect of our studies is to elucidate biochemical and molecular mechanisms mediating macrophage activation in the lung. This has involved investigations on signaling molecules, transcription factors, epigenetic regulators and microvesicles. We have also begun to assess the role of macrophages in tissue repair with a focus on impaired resolution of inflammation as a mechanism underlying tissue injury.

Research Highlights

  • Demonstrated that macrophages and inflammatory contribute to tissue injury induced by diverse pulmonary and hepatic toxicants
  • Discovered that pulmonary injury induced by ozone is mediated by cytotoxic reactive nitrogen species
  • Demonstrated that macrophage derived tumor necrosis factor –alpha plays a key role in both tissue injury and tissue repair
  • Identified distinct macrophage subpopulations that play unique role in tissue injury and tissue repair

Recent Awards and Honors

  • Rutgers Biomedical Health Sciences Lifetime Distinguished Achievement Award (2022)
  • Rutgers Biomedical Health Sciences Chancellor Distinguished Mentor Award (2021)
  • American Society of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics (ASPET), Toxicology Division Career Investigator Award (2021)
  • Society of Toxicology, Mechanisms Specialty Section Career Investigator Award (2018)
  • Society of Toxicology Education Award (2017)
  • Society of Toxicology, Inhalation and Respiratory Specialty Section Career Investigator Award (2015)
  • Society of Toxicology, Women in Toxicology Mentoring Award (2014)
  • Rutgers University Board of Trustees Award for Excellence in Research (2009)
  • Rutgers University Board of Trustees Award for Excellence in Research (2009)
  • Dermatology Specialty Section, Society of Toxicology, “Paper of the Year” Award (2009)
  • Named Roy Bowers Endowed Chair, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy (2007)

Other Recent Activities

  • Member, Scientific Advisory Board, Research institute of Fragrance Materials (2023-present)
  • President; Inhalation and Respiratory Specialty Section, Society of Toxicology 2018-2019
  • Vice Chair-elect: Inhalation and Respiratory Specialty Section, Society of Toxicology (2016-present)
  • Chair, Toxicology Division, American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics (2014-2015)
  • Member, NIH Systemic Injury by Environmental Exposure (SIEE) Review Panel (2014-2019)
  • Deputy Director NIEHS Center for Environmental Exposures and Disease (2009-present)
  • Associate Editor, Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology (2001-present)
  • Director Flow Cytometry/Cell Sorting and Confocal Microscopy Core Facility, EOHSI (1986-present)

Recent Publications

  1. Smith, LC, Abramova, H, Vayas, K, Rodriguez, J, Gelfand-Titiyevksiy, B, Roepke, T, Laskin, JD, Gow, AJ, Laskin, DL. Transcriptional profiling of lung macrophages following ozone exposure in mice identifies signaling pathways regulating immunometabolic activation. Toxicol Sci. 2024; :. doi: 10.1093/toxsci/kfae081. PubMed PMID:38897669
  2. Radbel, J, Meshanni, JA, Vayas, KN, Le-Hoang, O, Abramova, E, Zhou, P, Joseph, LB, Laskin, JD, Gow, AJ, Laskin, DL et al.. Effects of ozone exposure on lung injury, inflammation, and oxidative stress in a murine model of non-pneumonic endotoxemia. Toxicol Sci. 2024; :. doi: 10.1093/toxsci/kfae062. PubMed PMID:38749002
  3. Bellomo, A, Herbert, J, Kudlak, MJ, Laskin, JD, Gow, AJ, Laskin, DL. Identification of early events in nitrogen mustard pulmonary toxicity that are independent of infiltrating inflammatory cells using precision cut lung slices. Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 2024;486 :116941. doi: 10.1016/j.taap.2024.116941. PubMed PMID:38677601
  4. Malaviya, R, Meshanni, JA, Sunil, VR, Venosa, A, Guo, C, Abramova, EV, Vayas, KN, Jiang, C, Cervelli, JA, Gow, AJ et al.. Role of macrophage bioenergetics in N-acetylcysteine-mediated mitigation of lung injury and oxidative stress induced by nitrogen mustard. Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 2024;485 :116908. doi: 10.1016/j.taap.2024.116908. PubMed PMID:38513841
  5. Gutierrez, B, Aggarwal, T, Erguven, H, Stone, MRL, Guo, C, Bellomo, A, Abramova, E, Stevenson, ER, Laskin, DL, Gow, AJ et al.. Direct assessment of nitrative stress in lipid environments: Applications of a designer lipid-based biosensor for peroxynitrite. iScience. 2023;26 (12):108567. doi: 10.1016/j.isci.2023.108567. PubMed PMID:38144454 PubMed Central PMC10746523
  6. Laskin, JD, Ozkuyumcu, K, Zhou, P, Croutch, CR, Heck, DE, Laskin, DL, Joseph, LB. Skin Models Used to Define Mechanisms of Action of Sulfur Mustard. Disaster Med Public Health Prep. 2023;17 :e551. doi: 10.1017/dmp.2023.177. PubMed PMID:37849329
  7. Malaviya, R, Laskin, JD, Businaro, R, Laskin, DL. Targeting Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha to Mitigate Lung Injury Induced by Mustard Vesicants and Radiation. Disaster Med Public Health Prep. 2023;17 :e553. doi: 10.1017/dmp.2023.178. PubMed PMID:37848400 PubMed Central PMC10841250
  8. Smith, LC, Gow, AJ, Abramova, E, Vayas, K, Guo, C, Noto, J, Lyman, J, Rodriquez, J, Gelfand-Titiyevskiy, B, Malcolm, C et al.. Role of PPARγ in dyslipidemia and altered pulmonary functioning in mice following ozone exposure. Toxicol Sci. 2023;194 (1):109-119. doi: 10.1093/toxsci/kfad048. PubMed PMID:37202362 PubMed Central PMC10306402
  9. Meshanni, JA, Lee, JM, Vayas, KN, Sun, R, Jiang, C, Guo, GL, Gow, AJ, Laskin, JD, Laskin, DL. Suppression of Lung Oxidative Stress, Inflammation, and Fibrosis following Nitrogen Mustard Exposure by the Selective Farnesoid X Receptor Agonist Obeticholic Acid. J Pharmacol Exp Ther. 2024;388 (2):586-595. doi: 10.1124/jpet.123.001557. PubMed PMID:37188530 PubMed Central PMC10801770
  10. Cary, CM, Seymore, TN, Singh, D, Vayas, KN, Goedken, MJ, Adams, S, Polunas, M, Sunil, VR, Laskin, DL, Demokritou, P et al.. Single inhalation exposure to polyamide micro and nanoplastic particles impairs vascular dilation without generating pulmonary inflammation in virgin female Sprague Dawley rats. Part Fibre Toxicol. 2023;20 (1):16. doi: 10.1186/s12989-023-00525-x. PubMed PMID:37088832 PubMed Central PMC10122824
Search PubMed
  1. Sunil, VR, Vayas, KN, Fang, M, Zarbl, H, Massa, C, Gow, AJ, Cervelli, JA, Kipen, H, Laumbach, RJ, Lioy, PJ et al.. World Trade Center (WTC) dust exposure in mice is associated with inflammation, oxidative stress and epigenetic changes in the lung. Exp. Mol. Pathol. 2017;102 (1):50-58. doi: 1016/j.yexmp.2016.12.005. PubMed PMID:27986442
  2. Francis, M, Groves, AM, Sun, R, Cervelli, JA, Choi, H, Laskin, JD, Laskin, DL. Editor’s Highlight: CCR2 Regulates Inflammatory Cell Accumulation in the Lung and Tissue Injury following Ozone Exposure. Toxicol. Sci. 2017;155 (2):474-484. doi: 1093/toxsci/kfw226. PubMed PMID:27837169
  3. Francis, M, Sun, R, Cervelli, JA, Choi, H, Mandal, M, Abramova, EV, Gow, AJ, Laskin, JD, Laskin, DL. Editor’s Highlight: Role of Spleen-Derived Macrophages in Ozone-Induced Lung Inflammation and Injury. Toxicol. Sci. 2017;155 (1):182-195. doi: 1093/toxsci/kfw192. PubMed PMID:27708193
  4. Mandal, M, Gardner, CR, Sun R, Choi H, Lad S, Mishin V, Laskin JD, Laskin DL. The spleen as an extramedullary source of inflammatory cells responding to acetaminophen-induced live injury. Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 2017; 304: 110-120. doi:1016/j.taap.2016.04.019.  PMCID: PMC5147741
  5. Venosa A, Malaviya R, Gow AJ, Hall L, Laskin JD, Laskin DL. Protective role of spleen-derived macrophages in lung inflammation, injury and fibrosis induced by nitrogen mustard. Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol. 2015 Dec 15;309(12):L1487-98. doi: 10.1152/ajplung.00276.2015. PMID: 26475734 PMCID: PMC4683320 DOI: 10.1152/ajplung.00276.2015
  6. Malaviya R, Sunil VR, Venosa A, Verissimo VL, Cervelli JA, Vayas KN, Hall L, Laskin JD, Laskin DL. Attenuation of nitrogen mustard-induced pulmonary injury and fibrosis by anti-tumor necrosis factor antibody/Toxicol Sci. 2015 Nov;148(1):71-88. doi: 10.1093/toxsci/kfv161.
Photo of Jeffrey D Laskin Ph.D.
Jeffrey D Laskin, Ph.D.
Distinguished Professor & Director, Division of Toxicology Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences InstituteEOHSI – Toxicology

Distinguished Professor
Department of Environmental & Occupational Health
Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute
Rutgers University School of Public Health, Piscataway, NJ

Director of the Division of Toxicology
Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute (EOHSI)
Rutgers University School of Public Health, Piscataway, NJ

Director
Rutgers University CounterACT Research Center of Excellence
Rutgers University School of Public Health, Piscataway, NJ

 

Research Areas

Dr. Jeffrey D. Laskin is a Distinguished Professor in the School of Public Health at Rutgers University.  He is Director of the Division of Toxicology at the Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute (EOHSI) and is Deputy Director of the Joint Graduate Program in Toxicology at Rutgers University. He is Director of the Rutgers University CounterACT Research Center of Excellence, a major research effort to develop the most promising scientific discoveries that lead to improved medical countermeasures to protect Americans against a chemical attack.

Dr. Laskin received a B.A. in Chemistry and Biology from New York University, NY and a Ph.D. in Experimental Therapeutics from Roswell Park Cancer Institute, SUNY at Buffalo, NY. He was a post-doctoral fellow in the Institute for Cancer Research at the College of Physicians and Surgeons at Columbia University in NY before joining the faculty the Robert Wood Johnson Medical School and the School of Public Health at Rutgers University. Dr. Laskin has served on numerous study sections for the National Institutes of Health and was an invited participant at the National Institutes of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal Disorders Roundtable on Wound Healing. He is a member of the Cancer Institute of New Jersey, the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Rutgers University and is Deputy Director of the Joint Graduate Program in Toxicology at Rutgers University. Dr. Laskin has also served as a member of the corporation of the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, Massachusetts.

Dr. Laskin has served as a reviewer on over 30 journals that deal with pharmacology, toxicology and cancer research. With over 250 peer-reviewed publications, three books, and numerous book chapters and editorials, he has been recognized as one of the most cited scientists in the field of chemical toxicology. His research focuses on mechanisms of chemical-induced skin, lung and liver toxicity. He is an expert in mechanisms of chemical toxicity, phototoxicology and redox chemistry. Dr. Laskin has been continuously funded by the NIH for the last 35 years and has served as PI on numerous RO1’s, as a Program Project PI and as a Center Director. Currently, he is completing research on exposure and health effects of chemical warfare agents and is working to identify countermeasures to sulfur mustard exposure.

Research Highlights

  • Demonstrated that sulfur mustard induces autophagy in the skin
  • Developed models for sulfur mustard-induced skin and lung toxicity
  • Synthesized >100 inhibitors of chemical-induced skin and lung injury
  • Demonstrated that UVB light is an inducer of prostaglandin and leukotriene biosynthetic enzymes

Scholarly Activities

  • Founder, New Jersey Basic and Applied Dermatology Forum
  • NASA, Issues in Advanced Environmental Health and Advanced Food Technology
  • NIH grant reviewer
  • Member, Cancer Institute of New Jersey
  • Member, NJ Department of Homeland Security Preparedness College
  • Executive Committee, NJ Universities Homeland Security Research Consortium
  • Executive Committee, University Center for Disaster Preparedness and Emergency Response
  • Director, Rutgers University CounterACT Research Center of Excellence

Recent Publications

  1. Smith, LC, Abramova, H, Vayas, K, Rodriguez, J, Gelfand-Titiyevksiy, B, Roepke, T, Laskin, JD, Gow, AJ, Laskin, DL. Transcriptional profiling of lung macrophages following ozone exposure in mice identifies signaling pathways regulating immunometabolic activation. Toxicol Sci. 2024; :. doi: 10.1093/toxsci/kfae081. PubMed PMID:38897669
  2. Radbel, J, Meshanni, JA, Vayas, KN, Le-Hoang, O, Abramova, E, Zhou, P, Joseph, LB, Laskin, JD, Gow, AJ, Laskin, DL et al.. Effects of ozone exposure on lung injury, inflammation, and oxidative stress in a murine model of non-pneumonic endotoxemia. Toxicol Sci. 2024; :. doi: 10.1093/toxsci/kfae062. PubMed PMID:38749002
  3. Bellomo, A, Herbert, J, Kudlak, MJ, Laskin, JD, Gow, AJ, Laskin, DL. Identification of early events in nitrogen mustard pulmonary toxicity that are independent of infiltrating inflammatory cells using precision cut lung slices. Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 2024;486 :116941. doi: 10.1016/j.taap.2024.116941. PubMed PMID:38677601
  4. Roldan, TL, Li, S, Guillon, C, Heindel, ND, Laskin, JD, Lee, IH, Gao, D, Sinko, PJ. Optimizing Nanosuspension Drug Release and Wound Healing Using a Design of Experiments Approach: Improving the Drug Delivery Potential of NDH-4338 for Treating Chemical Burns. Pharmaceutics. 2024;16 (4):. doi: 10.3390/pharmaceutics16040471. PubMed PMID:38675132 PubMed Central PMC11053863
  5. Malaviya, R, Meshanni, JA, Sunil, VR, Venosa, A, Guo, C, Abramova, EV, Vayas, KN, Jiang, C, Cervelli, JA, Gow, AJ et al.. Role of macrophage bioenergetics in N-acetylcysteine-mediated mitigation of lung injury and oxidative stress induced by nitrogen mustard. Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 2024;485 :116908. doi: 10.1016/j.taap.2024.116908. PubMed PMID:38513841
  6. Laskin, JD, Ozkuyumcu, K, Zhou, P, Croutch, CR, Heck, DE, Laskin, DL, Joseph, LB. Skin Models Used to Define Mechanisms of Action of Sulfur Mustard. Disaster Med Public Health Prep. 2023;17 :e551. doi: 10.1017/dmp.2023.177. PubMed PMID:37849329
  7. Malaviya, R, Laskin, JD, Businaro, R, Laskin, DL. Targeting Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha to Mitigate Lung Injury Induced by Mustard Vesicants and Radiation. Disaster Med Public Health Prep. 2023;17 :e553. doi: 10.1017/dmp.2023.178. PubMed PMID:37848400 PubMed Central PMC10841250
  8. Smith, LC, Gow, AJ, Abramova, E, Vayas, K, Guo, C, Noto, J, Lyman, J, Rodriquez, J, Gelfand-Titiyevskiy, B, Malcolm, C et al.. Role of PPARγ in dyslipidemia and altered pulmonary functioning in mice following ozone exposure. Toxicol Sci. 2023;194 (1):109-119. doi: 10.1093/toxsci/kfad048. PubMed PMID:37202362 PubMed Central PMC10306402
  9. Meshanni, JA, Lee, JM, Vayas, KN, Sun, R, Jiang, C, Guo, GL, Gow, AJ, Laskin, JD, Laskin, DL. Suppression of Lung Oxidative Stress, Inflammation, and Fibrosis following Nitrogen Mustard Exposure by the Selective Farnesoid X Receptor Agonist Obeticholic Acid. J Pharmacol Exp Ther. 2024;388 (2):586-595. doi: 10.1124/jpet.123.001557. PubMed PMID:37188530 PubMed Central PMC10801770
  10. Roldan, TL, Li, S, Laskin, JD, Gao, D, Sinko, PJ. Depilatory double-disc mouse model for evaluation of vesicant dermal injury pharmacotherapy countermeasures. Animal Model Exp Med. 2023;6 (1):57-65. doi: 10.1002/ame2.12304. PubMed PMID:36872306 PubMed Central PMC9986227
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Photo of Robert Laumbach M.D., M.P.H., C.I.H.
Robert Laumbach, M.D., M.P.H., C.I.H.
Associate Professor Rutgers University – School of Public HealthEOHSI – Clinical Research and Occupational Medicine

Research Areas
Current research interests are focused on two areas: 1) the interactive effects of exposure to multiple air pollutants and psychosocial stressors, and their cumulative impact on urban disparities in asthma, heart disease and cancer and 2) biological mechanisms underlying the effects of diesel exhaust and other air pollutants on pulmonary and cardiovascular disease. Approaches include community-based participatory research, controlled exposure studies, and semi-controlled “real-world” environmental exposure studies.

Research Highlights

  • Using controlled exposure to study interactions between exposure to diesel exhaust and psychological stress, we demonstrated that diesel exhaust can cause systemic “sickness response symptoms” in young healthy adults
  • Using controlled exposure, we demonstrated that 1-aminopyrene may be a useful, specific biomarker for exposure to diesel exhaust.
  • A simulated commuter car ride caused changes in cardiovascular function among volunteers with diabetes, measured as a decrease in heart rate variability at 24 hours after the ride
  • Exposure to plume of dust and smoke from the 9/11 World Trade Center disaster was not associated with increased respiratory symptoms outside of the lower Manhattan area

Scholarly Activities

  • Development of collaborative relationships with stakeholders interested in applying scientific principles and knowledge to mitigate the environmental health problems and injustices in urban communities and communities adjacent to seaports in New Jersey.
  • Promotion of science in public health policy in New Jersey through service on the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection Science Advisory Board and New Jersey Clean Air Council.

Recent Publications

  1. Ayappa, I, Laumbach, R, Black, K, Weintraub, M, Agarwala, P, Twumasi, A, Sanders, H, Udasin, I, Harrison, D, de la Hoz, RE et al.. Nasal resistance and inflammation: mechanisms for obstructive sleep apnea from chronic rhinosinusitis. J Clin Sleep Med. 2024; :. doi: 10.5664/jcsm.11216. PubMed PMID:38888597
  2. Lu, FT, Laumbach, RJ, Legard, A, Myers, NT, Black, KG, Ohman-Strickland, P, Alimokhtari, S, de Resende, A, Calderón, L, Mainelis, G et al.. Real-World Effectiveness of Portable Air Cleaners in Reducing Home Particulate Matter Concentrations. Aerosol Air Qual Res. 2024;24 (1):. doi: 10.4209/aaqr.230202. PubMed PMID:38618024 PubMed Central PMC11014421
  3. Gholizadeh, A, Black, K, Kipen, H, Laumbach, R, Gow, A, Weisel, C, Javanmard, M. Detection of respiratory inflammation biomarkers in non-processed exhaled breath condensate samples using reduced graphene oxide. RSC Adv. 2022;12 (55):35627-35638. doi: 10.1039/d2ra05764f. PubMed PMID:36545081 PubMed Central PMC9745889
  4. Myers, NT, Laumbach, RJ, Black, KG, Ohman-Strickland, P, Alimokhtari, S, Legard, A, De Resende, A, Calderón, L, Lu, FT, Mainelis, G et al.. Portable air cleaners and residential exposure to SARS-CoV-2 aerosols: A real-world study. Indoor Air. 2022;32 (4):e13029. doi: 10.1111/ina.13029. PubMed PMID:35481935 PubMed Central PMC9111720
  5. Laumbach, RJ, Cromar, KR. Personal Interventions to Reduce Exposure to Outdoor Air Pollution. Annu Rev Public Health. 2022;43 :293-309. doi: 10.1146/annurev-publhealth-052120-103607. PubMed PMID:34936825
  6. Laumbach, RJ, Mainelis, G, Black, KG, Myers, NT, Ohman-Strickland, P, Alimokhtari, S, Hastings, S, Legard, A, de Resende, A, Calderón, L et al.. Presence of SARS-CoV-2 Aerosol in Residences of Adults with COVID-19. Ann Am Thorac Soc. 2022;19 (2):338-341. doi: 10.1513/AnnalsATS.202107-847RL. PubMed PMID:34762562 PubMed Central PMC8867362
  7. Sastry, J, Agawane, S, Rajan, M, Black, K, Laumbach, R, Ramagopal, M. The effect of the indoor environment on wheeze- and sleep-related symptoms in young Indian children. Lung India. 2021;38 (4):307-313. doi: 10.4103/lungindia.lungindia_120_20. PubMed PMID:34259167 PubMed Central PMC8272434
  8. Jan, I, Chen, K, Sayan, M, Uprety, P, Laumbach, RJ, Ennis, RD, Haffty, BG. Prevalence of Surface Contamination With SARS-CoV-2 in a Radiation Oncology Clinic. JAMA Oncol. 2020;6 (10):1632-1634. doi: 10.1001/jamaoncol.2020.3552. PubMed PMID:32852509 PubMed Central PMC7453342
  9. Mariduena, J, Ramagopal, M, Hiatt, M, Chandra, S, Laumbach, R, Hegyi, T. Vascular endothelial growth factor levels and bronchopulmonary dysplasia in preterm infants. J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med. 2022;35 (8):1517-1522. doi: 10.1080/14767058.2020.1760826. PubMed PMID:32366142
  10. Laumbach, RJ. Clearing the Air on Personal Interventions to Reduce Exposure to Wildfire Smoke. Ann Am Thorac Soc. 2019;16 (7):815-818. doi: 10.1513/AnnalsATS.201812-894PS. PubMed PMID:31145636 PubMed Central PMC6600837
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Photo of Jeehiun “Katherine” Lee Ph.D.
Jeehiun “Katherine” Lee, Ph.D.
Professor Rutgers UniversityEOHSI – Toxicology

Research Areas

Our laboratory is multi-disciplinary, with projects that range from organic to biological to analytical. Recent projects include: (i) exploring how damaged DNA differs from normal DNA. Mutated bases are linked to carcinogenesis and cell death and it is therefore important to understand how these damaged bases differ from normal bases. In particular, we are interested in how the damaged bases are identified and excised by enzymes; (ii) identification of small RNAs in cell lysates (collaborative project); (iii) studying the properties of silanols, particularly acidity, to characterize their potential as catalysts (collaborative project); (iv) examining the properties and reactivities of N-heterocyclic carbenes, which are a “hot” topic nowadays due to their versatility (as organometallic ligands, organocatalysts, components in environmentally friendly solvents). Our methods include traditional organic tools (including synthesis) as well as spectroscopy (mass spectrometry, UV absorbance, NMR), and computational chemistry.

Recent Publications

  1. Zhang, L, Ding, X, Kratka, CR, Levine, A, Lee, JK. Gas Phase Experimental and Computational Studies of AlkB Substrates: Intrinsic Properties and Biological Implications. J Org Chem. 2023;88 (18):13115-13124. doi: 10.1021/acs.joc.3c01335. PubMed PMID:37651719
  2. Zhang, L, Kiruba, GSM, Lee, JK. Gas-Phase Studies of Hypoxanthine-Guanine-(Xanthine) Phosphoribosyltransferase (HG(X)PRT) Substrates. J Org Chem. 2023;88 (11):6816-6826. doi: 10.1021/acs.joc.3c00115. PubMed PMID:37220241
  3. Lotsof, ER, Krajewski, AE, Anderson-Steele, B, Rogers, J, Zhang, L, Yeo, J, Conlon, SG, Manlove, AH, Lee, JK, David, SS et al.. NEIL1 Recoding due to RNA Editing Impacts Lesion-Specific Recognition and Excision. J Am Chem Soc. 2022;144 (32):14578-14589. doi: 10.1021/jacs.2c03625. PubMed PMID:35917336 PubMed Central PMC10231864
  4. Hinz, DJ, Zhang, L, Lee, JK. Mass spectrometry in organic and bio-organic catalysis: Using thermochemical properties to lend insight into mechanism. Mass Spectrom Rev. 2023;42 (5):1965-1983. doi: 10.1002/mas.21797. PubMed PMID:35899315
  5. Krajewski, AE, Lee, JK. Nucleophilicity and Electrophilicity in the Gas Phase: Silane Hydricity. J Org Chem. 2022;87 (3):1840-1849. doi: 10.1021/acs.joc.1c02763. PubMed PMID:35044778
  6. Krajewski, AE, Lee, JK. Gas-Phase Experimental and Computational Studies of 5-Halouracils: Intrinsic Properties and Biological Implications. J Org Chem. 2021;86 (9):6361-6370. doi: 10.1021/acs.joc.1c00183. PubMed PMID:33891415
  7. Majumdar, C, McKibbin, PL, Krajewski, AE, Manlove, AH, Lee, JK, David, SS. Unique Hydrogen Bonding of Adenine with the Oxidatively Damaged Base 8-Oxoguanine Enables Specific Recognition and Repair by DNA Glycosylase MutY. J Am Chem Soc. 2020;142 (48):20340-20350. doi: 10.1021/jacs.0c06767. PubMed PMID:33202125 PubMed Central PMC9187209
  8. Xu, J, Krajewski, AE, Niu, Y, Kiruba, GSM, Lee, JK. Kinetic hydricity of silane hydrides in the gas phase. Chem Sci. 2019;10 (34):8002-8008. doi: 10.1039/c9sc02118c. PubMed PMID:31853355 PubMed Central PMC6837013
  9. Wang, N, Lee, JK. Gas-Phase and Ionic Liquid Experimental and Computational Studies of Imidazole Acidity and Carbon Dioxide Capture. J Org Chem. 2019;84 (22):14593-14601. doi: 10.1021/acs.joc.9b02193. PubMed PMID:31647232
  10. Xu, J, Mieres-Perez, J, Sanchez-Garcia, E, Lee, JK. Gas-Phase Deprotonation of Benzhydryl Cations: Carbene Basicity, Multiplicity, and Rearrangements. J Org Chem. 2019;84 (12):7685-7693. doi: 10.1021/acs.joc.9b00496. PubMed PMID:31008604
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Alicia Legard
Technical Assistamt Rutgers UniversityEOHSI- Clinical Research and Occupational Medicine
Photo of Paul Lehrer Ph.D.
Paul Lehrer, Ph.D.
Rutgers UniversityEOHSI – Clinical Research and Occupational Medicine

Research Areas

  • Heart rate variability biofeedback as a treatment for asthma: a complement or alternative to steroids?
  • Psychological treatment of comorbid asthma and panic disorder
  • Heart rate variability biofeedback as a treatment for chronic drug and alcohol abuse
  • Psychophysiological correlates of emotional stimulation: relationship to chronic mood states, and tendencies to substance abuse
  • Measurement of adaptability and health: modeling control systems, oscillations as reflecting system stability
  • Exploring psychophysiological treatment approaches for patients with multiple unexplained physical symptoms
  • Psychophysiological factors in human optimal performance

Research Highlights

  • Found that heart rate variability biofeedback is 100% effective in preventing asthma exacerbations, while allowing lower doses of steroids, producing better pulmonary function, and fewer symptoms
  • Found that heart rate variability biofeedback improves symptomatology and depression among individuals with multiple unexplained physical symptoms
  • Found that people with negative mood states tend to have a greater thoracic than abdominal component in breathing
  • Developed a cognitive behavioral treatment that effectively helps people with comorbid asthma and panic disorder, improving both diseases, allowing less use of albuterol
  • Found that airplane pilots show patterns of hyperventilation and psychophysiological hyperarousal during difficult flight tasks
  • Found that sighing plays an important role in regulation of the respiratory system
  • Stimulation of the baroreflexes by heart rate variability biofeedback: a method for increasing autonomic stability and homeostasisa

Scholarly Activities

  • Associate editor, Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback and International Journal of Stress Management
  • Recent keynote talks to various scholarly organizations, including:
    • Association for Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback
    • German Biofeedback Society
    • Baltic Area Biofeedback Society
    • International Society for Advancement of Respiratory Psychophysiology
    • American Society for Clinical Hypnosis
  • Member of the Research Committee, UMDNJ, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School
  • President, USA branch of the International stress Management Association
  • Past president of Association for Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback and the International Association for Advancement of Respiratory Psychophysiology
  • Found that heart rate variability biofeedback decreases the autonomic downregulation produced by exposure to inflammatory cytokines

Recent Publications

  1. Aschbacher, K, Mather, M, Lehrer, P, Gevirtz, R, Epel, E, Peiper, NC. Real-time heart rate variability biofeedback amplitude during a large-scale digital mental health intervention differed by age, gender, and mental and physical health. Psychophysiology. 2024;61 (6):e14533. doi: 10.1111/psyp.14533. PubMed PMID:38454612
  2. Yoo, HJ, Nashiro, K, Dutt, S, Min, J, Cho, C, Thayer, JF, Lehrer, P, Chang, C, Mather, M. Daily biofeedback to modulate heart rate oscillations affects structural volume in hippocampal subregions targeted by the locus coeruleus in older adults but not younger adults. Neurobiol Aging. 2023;132 :85-99. doi: 10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2023.08.010. PubMed PMID:37769491 PubMed Central PMC10840698
  3. Yoo, HJ, Nashiro, K, Dutt, S, Min, J, Cho, C, Thayer, JF, Lehrer, P, Chang, C, Mather, M. Daily biofeedback to modulate heart rate oscillations affects structural volume in hippocampal subregions targeted by the locus coeruleus in older adults but not younger adults. medRxiv. 2023; :. doi: 10.1101/2023.03.02.23286715. PubMed PMID:37745356 PubMed Central PMC10516053
  4. Bachman, SL, Cole, S, Yoo, HJ, Nashiro, K, Min, J, Mercer, N, Nasseri, P, Thayer, JF, Lehrer, P, Mather, M et al.. Daily heart rate variability biofeedback training decreases locus coeruleus MRI contrast in younger adults in a randomized clinical trial. Int J Psychophysiol. 2023;193 :112241. doi: 10.1016/j.ijpsycho.2023.08.014. PubMed PMID:37647944 PubMed Central PMC10591988
  5. Yoo, HJ, Nashiro, K, Min, J, Cho, C, Mercer, N, Bachman, SL, Nasseri, P, Dutt, S, Porat, S, Choi, P et al.. Multimodal neuroimaging data from a 5-week heart rate variability biofeedback randomized clinical trial. Sci Data. 2023;10 (1):503. doi: 10.1038/s41597-023-02396-5. PubMed PMID:37516756 PubMed Central PMC10387077
  6. Bates, ME, Eddie, D, Lehrer, PM, Nolan, RP, Siepmann, M. Editorial: Integrated cardiovascular and neural system processes as potential mechanisms of behavior change. Front Psychiatry. 2023;14 :1175691. doi: 10.3389/fpsyt.2023.1175691. PubMed PMID:37032946 PubMed Central PMC10074486
  7. Cho, C, Yoo, HJ, Min, J, Nashiro, K, Thayer, JF, Lehrer, PM, Mather, M. Changes in Medial Prefrontal Cortex Mediate Effects of Heart Rate Variability Biofeedback on Positive Emotional Memory Biases. Appl Psychophysiol Biofeedback. 2023;48 (2):135-147. doi: 10.1007/s10484-023-09579-1. PubMed PMID:36658380 PubMed Central PMC10195741
  8. Nashiro, K, Yoo, HJ, Cho, C, Min, J, Feng, T, Nasseri, P, Bachman, SL, Lehrer, P, Thayer, JF, Mather, M et al.. Correction: Effects of a Randomised Trial of 5-Week Heart Rate Variability Biofeedback Intervention on Cognitive Function: Possible Benefits for Inhibitory Control. Appl Psychophysiol Biofeedback. 2023;48 (1):49. doi: 10.1007/s10484-022-09563-1. PubMed PMID:36152080 PubMed Central PMC10074510
  9. Nashiro, K, Min, J, Yoo, HJ, Cho, C, Bachman, SL, Dutt, S, Thayer, JF, Lehrer, PM, Feng, T, Mercer, N et al.. Increasing coordination and responsivity of emotion-related brain regions with a heart rate variability biofeedback randomized trial. Cogn Affect Behav Neurosci. 2023;23 (1):66-83. doi: 10.3758/s13415-022-01032-w. PubMed PMID:36109422 PubMed Central PMC9931635
  10. Yoo, HJ, Nashiro, K, Min, J, Cho, C, Bachman, SL, Nasseri, P, Porat, S, Dutt, S, Grigoryan, V, Choi, P et al.. Heart rate variability (HRV) changes and cortical volume changes in a randomized trial of five weeks of daily HRV biofeedback in younger and older adults. Int J Psychophysiol. 2022;181 :50-63. doi: 10.1016/j.ijpsycho.2022.08.006. PubMed PMID:36030986 PubMed Central PMC11195601
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Karen Lin
Rutgers UniversityEOHSI – Clinical Research and Occupational Medicine
Ruth Lin
Physician Rutgers UniversityEOHSI- Clinical Research and Occupational Medicine
Photo of Peter Lobel Ph.D.
Peter Lobel, Ph.D.
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular BiologyRutgers Behavioral Health Systems
Photo of Shou-En Lu Ph.D.
Shou-En Lu, Ph.D.
Associate Professor Rutgers University – School of Public HealthEOHSI – Environmental and Population Health Bio-Sciences

Recent Publications

  1. Ayappa, I, Laumbach, R, Black, K, Weintraub, M, Agarwala, P, Twumasi, A, Sanders, H, Udasin, I, Harrison, D, de la Hoz, RE et al.. Nasal resistance and inflammation: mechanisms for obstructive sleep apnea from chronic rhinosinusitis. J Clin Sleep Med. 2024; :. doi: 10.5664/jcsm.11216. PubMed PMID:38888597
  2. Sunderram, J, Legard, A, De Resende, A, Black, K, Udasin, IG, Lu, SE, Romero Castillo, H, Ravi, SS, Mullins, AE, de la Hoz, RE et al.. Lack of association of impaired upper airway sensation with the presence or absence of obstructive sleep apnoea or chronic rhinosinusitis in World Trade Center responders. Occup Environ Med. 2024; :. doi: 10.1136/oemed-2023-109262. PubMed PMID:38871449
  3. Chen, Y, Lin, Y, Lu, SE, Shih, WJ, Quan, H. Two-stage stratified designs with survival outcomes and adjustment for misclassification in predictive biomarkers. Stat Med. 2024;43 (10):1883-1904. doi: 10.1002/sim.10048. PubMed PMID:38634277 PubMed Central PMC11068307
  4. Cooperman, NA, Lu, SE, Garland, EL. Pain Scores as Secondary Outcomes-Opioid Reduction Studies-Reply. JAMA Psychiatry. 2024; :. doi: 10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2024.0522. PubMed PMID:38630456
  5. An, J, McDougall, J, Lin, Y, Lu, SE, Walters, ST, Heidt, E, Stroup, A, Paddock, L, Grumet, S, Toppmeyer, D et al.. Randomized trial promoting cancer genetic risk assessment when genetic counseling cost removed: 1-year follow-up. JNCI Cancer Spectr. 2024;8 (2):. doi: 10.1093/jncics/pkae018. PubMed PMID:38490263 PubMed Central PMC11006111
  6. Portal, D, Lu, SE, Piperdi, H, Jabbour, SK, Reyhan, M. Adaptive Lung Radiation Therapy in the Era of Immunotherapy: A Single-Center Retrospective Study. Adv Radiat Oncol. 2024;9 (1):101315. doi: 10.1016/j.adro.2023.101315. PubMed PMID:38260217 PubMed Central PMC10801661
  7. Lu, SE, Kim, S, Cheng, JQ, Lin, C, Goyal, S, Jabbour, SK. Fixed and random effect selections in generalized linear mixed models. Stat Methods Med Res. 2024;33 (1):3-23. doi: 10.1177/09622802231221201. PubMed PMID:38155567
  8. Manne, S, Wu, Y, Buller, D, Heckman, C, Devine, K, Frederick, S, Solleder, J, Schaefer, A, Lu, SE. The Effects of a Parent-Focused Social Media Intervention on Child Sun Safety: Pilot and Feasibility Study. JMIR Form Res. 2023;7 :e48402. doi: 10.2196/48402. PubMed PMID:38064250 PubMed Central PMC10746961
  9. Cooperman, NA, Lu, SE, Hanley, AW, Puvananayagam, T, Dooley-Budsock, P, Kline, A, Garland, EL. Telehealth Mindfulness-Oriented Recovery Enhancement vs Usual Care in Individuals With Opioid Use Disorder and Pain: A Randomized Clinical Trial. JAMA Psychiatry. 2024;81 (4):338-346. doi: 10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2023.5138. PubMed PMID:38061786 PubMed Central PMC10704342
  10. Fredericks-Younger, J, Greenberg, P, Andrews, T, Matheson, PB, Desjardins, PJ, Lu, SE, Feldman, CA. Leveraging the functionality of Research Electronic Data Capture (REDCap) to enhance data collection and quality in the Opioid Analgesic Reduction Study. Clin Trials. 2024;21 (3):381-389. doi: 10.1177/17407745231212190. PubMed PMID:37961913 PubMed Central PMC11090991
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Photo of Kevin Lyons Ph.D.
Kevin Lyons, Ph.D.
Associate Professor – Director, Rutgers Center for Local Supply Chain Resiliency Rutgers UniversityEOHSI – Global Environmental Health Division

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